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I am looking for fast class for to work with text files and comfortable reading different object (methods like NextInt32, NextDouble, NextLine, etc). Can you advice me something?

Edit: BinaryReader is bad class in my case. Format of my data is not binary. I have file like

1 2 3
FirstToken NextToken
1.23 2,34

And I want read this file with code like:

int a = FileReader.NextInt32();
int b = FileReader.NextInt32();
int c = FileReader.NextInt32();
int d = FileReader.NextString();
int e = FileReader.NextString();
int f = FileReader.NextDouble();
int g = FileReader.NextDouble();

Edit2: I am looking for analog Scanner from Java

share|improve this question
    
From the example I tkae it: All whitespace (space, newline etc) is separator, and you know the order in which data (the types) will appear. Can you confirm this? –  Henk Holterman Oct 13 '09 at 18:42
    
@Henk, Yes, you're right –  AndreyAkinshin Oct 13 '09 at 18:48
1  
By the way, 2,34 in your sample input should be treated as a single decimal number 2.24 (i.e. you want to handle both period and comma as decimal point), or as two integers 2 and 24, or as string "2,24"? If you want both kinds of decimal separators, have you considered the fact that other locales may use other characters for this purpose (neither comma nor period)? –  Pavel Minaev Oct 13 '09 at 19:07
    
@Pavel Minaev, In ideal case params of constructor contains set of token separators and set of decimals separators. "2.24" we can read as string and can read as double (both way are valid) –  AndreyAkinshin Oct 13 '09 at 19:19
    
Passing decimal separators specifically sounds like a bad idea, because that would necessitate custom number parsing code. How about passing a CultureInfo instead? –  Pavel Minaev Oct 13 '09 at 19:29

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'm going to add this as a separate answer because it's quite distinct from the answer I already gave. Here's how you could start creating your own Scanner class:

class Scanner : System.IO.StringReader
{
  string currentWord;

  public Scanner(string source) : base(source)
  {
     readNextWord();
  }

  private void ReadNextWord()
  {
     System.Text.StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
     char nextChar;
     int next;
     do
     {
        next = this.Read();
        if (next < 0)
           break;
        nextChar = (char)next;
        if (char.IsWhiteSpace(nextChar))
           break;
        sb.Append(nextChar);
     } while (true);
     while((this.Peek() >= 0) && (char.IsWhiteSpace((char)this.Peek())))
        this.Read();
     if (sb.Length > 0)
        currentWord = sb.ToString();
     else
        currentWord = null;
  }

  public bool HasNextInt()
  {
     if (currentWord == null)
        return false;
     int dummy;
     return int.TryParse(currentWord, out dummy);
  }

  public int NextInt()
  {
     try
     {
        return int.Parse(currentWord);
     }
     finally
     {
        readNextWord();
     }
  }

  public bool HasNextDouble()
  {
     if (currentWord == null)
        return false;
     double dummy;
     return double.TryParse(currentWord, out dummy);
  }

  public double NextDouble()
  {
     try
     {
        return double.Parse(currentWord);
     }
     finally
     {
        readNextWord();
     }
  }

  public bool HasNext()
  {
     return currentWord != null;
  }
}
share|improve this answer

You should define exactly what your file format is meant to look like. How would you represent a string with a space in it? What determines where the line terminators go?

In general you can use TextReader and its ReadLine method, followed by double.TryParse, int.TryParse etc - but you'll need to pin the format down more first.

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1  
To add to this, one could add a decorator class for TextReader to provide convenience ReadInt32 etc methods; or extension methods on TextReader itself. I'm not aware of any such stock classes, however. –  Pavel Minaev Oct 13 '09 at 18:53
    
Pavel is right. I'm looking for just such a class –  AndreyAkinshin Oct 13 '09 at 18:59
2  
@DreamWalker: the reason why there isn't any standard class for this is that there's a multitude of slightly different text-based formats with no clear standard: whitespace or commas for separators; quoted strings optional/required/not supported; etc. The most common one is CSV (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comma-separated_values), and even then there are variations; but at least if you had CSV, there are quite a few premade parsers out there. If you want something different, you will most likely have to write it yourself. –  Pavel Minaev Oct 13 '09 at 19:03
    
@Pavel Minaev: I was hoping that there is already written class. It is not necessarily standart class. It can be class from some open-source framework or something like it –  AndreyAkinshin Oct 13 '09 at 19:23

I believe this extension method for TextReader would do the trick:

public static class TextReaderTokenizer
{
    // Adjust as needed. -1 is EOF.
    private static int[] whitespace = { -1, ' ', '\r' , '\n', '\t' };

    public static T ReadToken<T>(this TextReader reader)
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        while (Array.IndexOf(whitespace, reader.Peek()) < 0)
        {
            sb.Append((char)reader.Read());
        }
        return (T)Convert.ChangeType(sb.ToString(), typeof(T));
    }    
}

It can be used thus:

TextReader reader = File.OpenText("foo.txt");
int n = reader.ReadToken<int>();
string s = reader.ReadToken<string>();

[EDIT] As requested in question comments, here's an instance wrapper version of the above that is parametrized with delimiters and CultureInfo:

public class TextTokenizer
{
    private TextReader reader;
    private Predicate<char> isDelim;
    private CultureInfo cultureInfo;

    public TextTokenizer(TextReader reader, Predicate<char> isDelim, CultureInfo cultureInfo)
    {
        this.reader = reader;
        this.isDelim = isDelim;
        this.cultureInfo = cultureInfo;
    }

    public TextTokenizer(TextReader reader, char[] delims, CultureInfo cultureInfo)
    {
        this.reader = reader;
        this.isDelim = c => Array.IndexOf(delims, c) >= 0;
        this.cultureInfo = cultureInfo;
    }

    public TextReader BaseReader
    {
        get { return reader; }
    }

    public T ReadToken<T>()
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        while (true)
        {
            int c = reader.Peek();
            if (c < 0 || isDelim((char)c))
            {
                break;
            }
            sb.Append((char)reader.Read());
        }
        return (T)Convert.ChangeType(sb.ToString(), typeof(T));
    }    
}

Sample usage:

TextReader reader = File.OpenText("foo.txt");
TextTokenizer tokenizer = new TextTokenizer(
    reader,
    new[] { ' ', '\r', '\n', '\t' },
    CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
int n = tokenizer.ReadToken<int>();
string s = tokenizer.ReadToken<string>();
share|improve this answer

Have you checked out the BinaryReader class? Yes it's a text file but there is nothing stopping you from treating it as binary data and hence using BinaryReader. It has all of the methods that you are looking for with the exception of ReadLine. However it wouldn't be too difficult to implement that method on top of BinaryReader.

share|improve this answer
    
Agreed, except that implementing ReadLine on top of BinaryReader would be some task, if you design it to handle arbitrary encodings and not interrupt the reading of binary data. –  Noldorin Oct 13 '09 at 18:20
    
BinaryReader will read doubles from Text? –  Henk Holterman Oct 13 '09 at 18:20
    
@Henk, yes. It just sees a stream of bytes. As long as the encoding is correct it will read them. –  JaredPar Oct 13 '09 at 18:21
    
@Noldorin, yeah making it Encoding agnostic would be a bit tricky. –  JaredPar Oct 13 '09 at 18:22
1  
@JaredPar: Using BinaryReader.ReadDouble won't read text and parse it though. It will treat that text as bytes, which isn't the idea. –  Jon Skeet Oct 13 '09 at 18:38

If you do need text files (ie UTF-8 or ASCII encoding) then the binary writer will not work.

You can use the TextReader, but unlike the BinaryReader and the TextWriter it does not support any types other than Line and char. You will have to define what separators are allowed and parse the Line base data yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
I think, than string.Split() is very slow method. I need speed –  AndreyAkinshin Oct 13 '09 at 19:25

The System.IO.BinaryReader class is what you need.

Example of implementation of a ReadLine method:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static String ReadLine(this BinaryReader binaryReader)
    {
        var bytes = new List<Byte>();
        byte temp;

        while ((temp = (byte)binaryReader.Read()) < 10)
            bytes.Add(temp);

        return Encoding.Default.GetString(bytes.ToArray());
    }
}

Example for using this class:

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Security.Permissions;

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        // Load application settings.
        AppSettings appSettings = new AppSettings();
        Console.WriteLine("App settings:\nAspect Ratio: {0}, " +
            "Lookup directory: {1},\nAuto save time: {2} minutes, " +
            "Show status bar: {3}\n",
            new Object[4]{appSettings.AspectRatio.ToString(),
            appSettings.LookupDir, appSettings.AutoSaveTime.ToString(),
            appSettings.ShowStatusBar.ToString()});

        // Change the settings.
        appSettings.AspectRatio   = 1.250F;
        appSettings.LookupDir     = @"C:\Temp";
        appSettings.AutoSaveTime  = 10;
        appSettings.ShowStatusBar = true;

        // Save the new settings.
        appSettings.Close();
    }
}

// Store and retrieve application settings.
class AppSettings
{
    const string fileName = "AppSettings#@@#.dat";
    float  aspectRatio;
    string lookupDir;
    int    autoSaveTime;
    bool   showStatusBar;

    public float AspectRatio
    {
        get{ return aspectRatio; }
        set{ aspectRatio = value; }
    }

    public string LookupDir
    {
        get{ return lookupDir; }
        set{ lookupDir = value; }
    }

    public int AutoSaveTime
    {
        get{ return autoSaveTime; }
        set{ autoSaveTime = value; }
    }

    public bool ShowStatusBar
    {
        get{ return showStatusBar; }
        set{ showStatusBar = value; }
    }

    public AppSettings()
    {
        // Create default application settings.
        aspectRatio   = 1.3333F;
        lookupDir     = @"C:\AppDirectory";
        autoSaveTime  = 30;
        showStatusBar = false;

        if(File.Exists(fileName))
        {
            BinaryReader binReader =
                new BinaryReader(File.Open(fileName, FileMode.Open));
            try
            {
                // If the file is not empty,
                // read the application settings.
                // First read 4 bytes into a buffer to
                // determine if the file is empty.
                byte[] testArray = new byte[3];
                int count = binReader.Read(testArray, 0, 3);

                if (count != 0)
                {
                    // Reset the position in the stream to zero.
                    binReader.BaseStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);

                    aspectRatio   = binReader.ReadSingle();
                    lookupDir     = binReader.ReadString();
                    autoSaveTime  = binReader.ReadInt32();
                    showStatusBar = binReader.ReadBoolean();
                }
            }

            // If the end of the stream is reached before reading
            // the four data values, ignore the error and use the
            // default settings for the remaining values.
            catch(EndOfStreamException e)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("{0} caught and ignored. " +
                    "Using default values.", e.GetType().Name);
            }
            finally
            {
                binReader.Close();
            }
        }

    }

    // Create a file and store the application settings.
    public void Close()
    {
        using(BinaryWriter binWriter =
            new BinaryWriter(File.Open(fileName, FileMode.Create)))
        {
            binWriter.Write(aspectRatio);
            binWriter.Write(lookupDir);
            binWriter.Write(autoSaveTime);
            binWriter.Write(showStatusBar);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's a very strange implementation of ReadLine, as well as using the default encoding rather than the encoding of the binary reader. How would you expect it to ever return any printable text? –  Jon Skeet Oct 13 '09 at 18:36
    
Additionally - Binary*Reader isn't appropriate for *text files. –  Jon Skeet Oct 13 '09 at 18:37
    
BinaryReader is bad class for me. Look to my edit. –  AndreyAkinshin Oct 13 '09 at 18:38
    
How can I get the default encoding of the binary reader? –  Alon Gubkin Oct 13 '09 at 18:38
    
You'd call ReadChar instead of reading individual bytes. –  Jon Skeet Oct 13 '09 at 18:41

You don't really say what you're ultimately trying to accomplish here. But if you have any control at all over the file format, you might consider XML Serialization rather than trying to roll your own scanning/parsing/converting schemes.

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You can probably use the System.IO.File Class to read the file and System.Convert to parse the strings you read from the file.

string line = String.Empty;
while( (line = file.ReadLine()).IsNullOrEmpty() == false )
{
   TYPE value = Convert.ToTYPE( line );
}

Where TYPE is whatever type you're dealing with at that particular line / file.

If there are multiple values on one line you could do a split and read the individual values e.g.

string[] parts = line.Split(' ');
if( parts.Length > 1 )
{
   foreach( string item in parts )
   {
      TYPE value = Convert.ToTYPE( item );
   }
}
else
{
   // Use the code from before
}
share|improve this answer
    
This will treat each line as a single value. He wants a single line foo 123 bar to be treated as 3 distinct values. –  Pavel Minaev Oct 13 '09 at 19:04
    
@Pavel Minaev Added support for that, thanx for the suggestion –  TJB Oct 13 '09 at 22:56

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