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When using this I am getting the default design for Ruby on Rails enter image description here. How can i just print it as regular text in my current design like <%= error.text %>?

Model:

class Users < ActiveRecord::Base
  validates_presence_of :username, :message => "Du skal udfylde brugernavn"
  attr_accessible :email, :password, :username
end

Controller:

class HomeController < ApplicationController
  def index

     if params[:username]
         l = Users.new(:username => params[:username], :password => params[:password], :email => params[:email]).save!

         if Users.save? 
                z = Users.where(:username => params[:username]).limit(1).last
                @debugging="Yay"
         else
                @debugging = user.errors.full_messages.join("<br/>")
         end             
     end
   end
 end
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1  
you are calling validates twice, modify that as validates_presence_of :username, :message => "Du skal udfylde brugernavn" –  Sagar Bommidi Mar 25 '13 at 17:12
    
@SagarBommidi presence => true is ignored. –  codeit Mar 25 '13 at 17:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In model:

validates_presence_of :username, :message => "Du skal udfylde brugernavn"

In controller:

if user.save
   flash[:success] = 'User saved successfully'
else
   flash[:error] = user.errors.full_messages.join('<br />')
end

Edit

Not if Users.save? it should be l.save. (I suggest you to use User as model)

if params[:username]
   l = Users.new(:username => params[:username], :password => params[:password], :email => params[:email])

   if l.save 
      z = Users.where(:username => params[:username]).limit(1).last
      @debugging="Yay"
   else
      @debugging = l.errors.full_messages.join("<br/>")
   end
end
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Hmm, that didn't make it. Check my question again for my new code. –  jesper Mar 25 '13 at 17:56
    
Yes i tried that also. Just showing ruby default page. –  jesper Mar 25 '13 at 18:02
    
Remove .save! from the end –  codeit Mar 25 '13 at 18:06
    
This did the trick: "if l.save" and not "if l.save?" –  jesper Mar 25 '13 at 18:07
    
yeah, sorry for the typo. thanks –  codeit Mar 25 '13 at 18:09

your_object.errors returns an associative array : {:username => "Du skal udfylde brugernavn"}

So you can do something like :

<%= user.errors[:username] %>

See more info on how to use this your views here (official Ruby on Rails doc) : http://guides.rubyonrails.org/active_record_validations_callbacks.html#working-with-validation-errors

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It will still break the page. –  codeit Mar 25 '13 at 17:12
    
Use Codeit way of saving in your controller. You should use .save? in an if statement if you want to check that the save was actually OK. Then display the correct page. –  almathie Mar 25 '13 at 17:16

from Rails Guide to Validations:

To verify whether or not a particular attribute of an object is valid, you can use errors[:attribute]. It returns an array of all the errors for :attribute. If there are no errors on the specified attribute, an empty array is returned.

So, just display the errors hash..

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