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Currently I am a still a beginner in twisted and this vexed me.

I am sending out a sequence of commands via TCP and awaiting a response from the lineRecieved reader, which can take a number of seconds to process and arrive so I wrapped it in a defered. The first deferred works fine but the second one fires as the first one is still processing resulting in garbage as the endpoint can only process one command at a time. Expected behavior in an asysc system but not what I need to happen. If I have one or two commands I could use a deferedChain to process but as I have potentially dozens of commands to run sequentially I fear this will turn into unmaintainable spaghetti fast.

What is the clean way to do this?

Many thanks

Example code

def connectionMade(self):
    self.fire_def('command1')
    print'fire command 2'
    self.fire_def('command2')#Fires when command one is running

def fire_def(self,request):
    d = self.getInfo(request)
    d.addCallback(self.print_result)
    return d

def print_result(result):
    print result


def getInfo(self,request):
    print 'sending', request
    self.d  = defer.Deferred()
    self.sendLine(request)
    return self.d

def lineReceived(self, line):
    line = line.strip()
     self.buffer.append(line)
    if self.d is None:
        return
    if  'result_I_want' in self.buffer:
        print 'Firing Callback'
        self.d.callback(self.buffer)
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The code in your question only knows how to keep track of one Deferred. If application code calls getInfo twice without enough intervening time for the first action to complete with a result, then it will corrupt its own internal tracking state:

def getInfo(self,request):
    print 'sending', request
    self.d  = defer.Deferred()
    self.sendLine(request)
    return self.d

d_foo = getInfo(foo)
d_bar = getInfo(bar)

In this sequence, d_foo and d_bar are different Deferred instances. However, on the second call to getInfo, the value of the attributeself.d is changed from d_foo to d_bar. The d_foo Deferred is lost. Later, when `lineReceived runs:

def lineReceived(self, line):
    line = line.strip()
    self.buffer.append(line)
    if self.d is None:
        return
    if  'result_I_want' in self.buffer:
        print 'Firing Callback'
        self.d.callback(self.buffer)

self.d is d_bar even though the line is probably a response to the foo request. This means d_bar will get the response for foo and d_foo will never get any response at all.

To fix this problem, it may help to keep a list (or queue) of Deferred instances on the protocol. Append to it when a new info request is made, pop from the front of it when a response is received. (I'm not sure what protocol you're implementing, so I don't know how you'll decide how many lines is sufficient to constitute a response. If the protocol doesn't define this then it is broken and you may want to switch to a better protocol.)

If you fix this, then responses will at least get delivered to different Deferred instances.

You also described a problem relating to forcing sequential operation. There are a few ways I could interpret this. One way is to interpret it as meaning you only want one request to be "outstanding" on the network at a time. In other words, you don't want getInfo to send new request lines until after lineReceived has delivered response data to the Deferred returned by the previous call to getInfo.

In this case, Deferred chaining is just the thing. Despite the fact that you have N Deferreds, when you're imposing this sequential restriction, you actually have a series of 2 Deferreds. You have the Deferred that runs earlier and the Deferred that should only run later after the earlier one has its result. You extend this to N by then considering the later Deferred to be the earlier Deferred in a new pair, and a third Deferred becomes the new later Deferred.

Or put another way, if you have D1, D2, D3, and D4, then you chain them like:

D2 is chained to D1 and only runs when D1 is complete
D3 is chained to D2 and only runs when D2 is complete
D4 is chained to D3 and only runs when D3 is complete

However, while this can work, it's actually not the easiest way to implement serialization. Instead, I suggest explicitly queueing up work in getInfo and explicitly unqueueing it in lineReceived:.

def _sendRequest(self, d, request):
    print 'sending', request
    self.d = d
    self.sendLine(request)

def getInfo(self,request):
    if self.d is None:
        d = defer.Deferred()
        self._sendRequest(d, request)
        return d
    else:
        queued_d = defer.Deferred()
        self._requests.append((request, queued_d))
        return queued_d


def lineReceived(self, line):
    line = line.strip()
    self.buffer.append(line)
    if self.d is None:
        return
    if  'result_I_want' in self.buffer:
        print 'Firing Callback'
        now_d = self.d
        self.d = None
        buffer = self.buffer
        self.buffer = []
        if self._requests:
            request, queued_d = self._requests.pop(0)
            self._sendRequest(queued_d, request)
        now_d.callback(buffer)

Notice how in lineReceived the code takes care to put everything into a consistent state before the now_d.callback(buffer) line. This is a subtle but important point. There may be callbacks on now_d which impact the protocol - for example, by calling getInfo again. It is important for the protocol to be in a consistent state before causing that code to run, otherwise it will get confused - perhaps by sending requests out of order, or queueing up requests when they should actually be sent. This is an example of making code safe against re-entrancy. This isn't an idea that's unique to Twisted-using programs, but since people most often associate the idea of re-entrancy with threaded program, people often overlook the possibility when writing Twisted-based code.

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One of the clearest and most comprehensive answers I have ever gotten Jean-Paul,many thanks. –  Marcus1219 Mar 26 '13 at 15:13

Basically, you return deferreds from one another if you want them executed one after another.

So you want d2 to execute only after d1 is done, fine then, return d2 from d1's callback.

In other words, per your example, you'd need to call command2 somewhere near the end of command1's callback.

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Thanks I know that is basically the idea but that pattern will get hugely confusing dealing with N numbers of defereds,some of which will have a dependency on each other,eg if defered 20 fails,fire 21 else 22 etc.Glyph states that you blocking for a defered is a bad pattern which makes sense however Im wondering what is the right pattern to execute a synchronous command chain the twisted way. –  Marcus1219 Mar 26 '13 at 11:01
1  
Eeek! Aren't there errbacks for when a deferred fails? Otherwise, it's all no more complicated than a state machine which your protocol handler is. Just instead of statements s1, s2, s3 .... which you normally write one by one and let the interpreter manage the control flow, you write s1 returning a deferred to fire with s2 which returns a deferred with s3 as its callback, and let the reactor control your flow. You can use inlinecallbacks if you think it's all too twisted to read. –  Yaroslav Fedevych Mar 26 '13 at 21:42

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