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I am writing an application that makes use of pandas (version 0.10.1) to store the underlying data model as a (3-level) MultiIndex'ed DataFrame. The model is a line spectrum, and the top level of the index is the atomic transition.

A simple dataframe could look like this:

                               Pos     Sigma       Ampl  Line center Identifier
H-alpha-6697.6 30-30 Comp2  -3.600  0.774000  33.058000       6699.5          b
                     Comp3   3.538  2.153000  28.054000       6699.5          c
                     Contin    NaN       NaN   0.000000          NaN        NaN
                     Comp4   1.384  0.921000  37.504000       6699.5          d
                     Comp1  -2.124  1.977000  69.166000       6699.5          a
               31-31 Comp2  -3.292  0.884603  49.813423       6699.5          b
                     Comp3   3.600  2.299000  19.999000       6699.5          c
                     Contin    NaN       NaN   0.000000          NaN        NaN
                     Comp4   1.692  1.009000  22.222000       6699.5          d
                     Comp1  -1.262  2.534000  68.002000       6699.5          a

At some point, I need to be able to create a different transition, e.g. H-beta, using H-alpha as a template. I would ideally do this by something like df.ix['H-beta-wavelength'] = df.ix['H-alpha-6697.6'], but this is not possible to do. So instead, I tried following this example: Prepend a level to a pandas MultiIndex

However, the example above requires the .names of the multiindex levels to be set in order to reorder them. And the names attribute is set when initializing the dataframe, but during the building of it, I rely quite extensibly on the set_values() method, and doing this destroys the names attribute - or rather sets them to [None, None, None].

Example:

In [68]: df
Out[68]: 
                                  Pos  Sigma     Ampl  Line center Identifier
Transition     Rows  Component                                               
Center: 6699.5 26-26 Comp2     -3.846  0.657  15.2740       6699.5          b
                     Comp3      2.924  1.449  31.3930       6699.5          c
                     Contin       NaN    NaN   0.0000          NaN        NaN
                     Comp4      8.030  1.009   7.0831       6699.5          d
                     Comp1     -1.816  2.153  50.2750       6699.5          a

In [69]: df.set_value(('Center: 5044.3', '26-26', 'Comp1'), 'Sigma', 2.457)
Out[69]: 
                               Pos  Sigma     Ampl  Line center Identifier
Center: 6699.5 26-26 Comp2  -3.846  0.657  15.2740       6699.5          b
                     Comp3   2.924  1.449  31.3930       6699.5          c
                     Contin    NaN    NaN   0.0000          NaN        NaN
                     Comp4   8.030  1.009   7.0831       6699.5          d
                     Comp1  -1.816  2.153  50.2750       6699.5          a
Center: 5044.3 26-26 Comp1     NaN  2.457      NaN          NaN        NaN

Of course, this makes it quite hard to use the names for reordering the levels of the multiindex. Is there a way to avoid this, short of brute-force setting the names after each time I've run set_values()?

EDIT: simpler, reproducible example.

Here is an iPython session recreating the index.names problem with a somewhat simpler example. It also shows that it is possibly a bug that goes beyond index.names, as it seems to change the index.lexsort_depth from 3 to 0. Missing numbers in the prompt are just unnecessary views of the dataframe. I believe that one must choose secondary and/or tertiary indices that already exist like I have done below in order to reproduce it.

In [4]: idx = pd.MultiIndex.from_arrays(
            [['Hans']*4 + ['Grethe']*4, ['1', '1', '2', '2']*2, ['a', 'b']*4], 
            names=['Name', 'Number', 'Letter'])

In [5]: df = pd.DataFrame(
            random.random((8, 3)), 
            columns=['one', 'two','three'], 
            index=idx)


In [6]: df
Out[6]: 
                           one       two     three
Name   Number Letter                              
Hans   1      a       0.803566  0.434574  0.805976
              b       0.655322  0.208469  0.989559
       2      a       0.893952  0.380358  0.173764
              b       0.822446  0.673894  0.676573
Grethe 1      a       0.202641  0.387263  0.405296
              b       0.646733  0.086953  0.882114
       2      a       0.358458  0.147107  0.769586
              b       0.183782  0.477863  0.601098

# To rule out another possible source of problems:
In [9]: df.unstack().drop(('Grethe', '1')).stack()
Out[9]: 
                           one       two     three
Name   Number Letter                              
Grethe 2      a       0.358458  0.147107  0.769586
              b       0.183782  0.477863  0.601098
Hans   1      a       0.803566  0.434574  0.805976
              b       0.655322  0.208469  0.989559
       2      a       0.893952  0.380358  0.173764
              b       0.822446  0.673894  0.676573

In [10]: df.set_value(('Frans', '2', 'b'), 'one', 23.)
Out[10]: 
                  one       two     three
Hans   1 a   0.803566  0.434574  0.805976
         b   0.655322  0.208469  0.989559
       2 a   0.893952  0.380358  0.173764
         b   0.822446  0.673894  0.676573
Grethe 1 a   0.202641  0.387263  0.405296
         b   0.646733  0.086953  0.882114
       2 a   0.358458  0.147107  0.769586
         b   0.183782  0.477863  0.601098
Frans  2 b  23.000000       NaN       NaN

In [11]: df = df.sortlevel(level='Name')

In [13]: df.index.lexsort_depth
Out[13]: 3

In [14]: df.set_value(('Frans', '2', 'b'), 'one', 23.).index.lexsort_depth
Out[14]: 0
share|improve this question
    
can u add pandas version? –  Jeff Mar 25 '13 at 17:46
    
Pandas version is 0.10.1. Added to the question. –  Thriveth Mar 25 '13 at 17:49
    
I realize that I can reorder the levels by integer index instead of by name, and if that is the only solution, I'll write this as the answer. However, it seems like broken or at least unintentional behavior, and I hope there is another answer out there, so I'll wait a bit. –  Thriveth Mar 25 '13 at 19:02
    
Strangely, when trying a simpler example (of both a single index and multiindex I can't recreate this on 0.10.1 - the names seem to propogate)... –  Andy Hayden Mar 25 '13 at 20:33
    
Andy, Maybe that is because of what Jeff mentions about sortedness of the index? If you have performed no operations on it that messes up its sortedness, that would apparently not raise the problem. –  Thriveth Mar 25 '13 at 20:57

2 Answers 2

Your index needs to be sorted! See docs here: http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/dev/indexing.html#the-need-for-sortedness and these recipes may help http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/dev/cookbook.html This is 0.10.1 as well

Heres a sorted frame

In [26]: index = pd.MultiIndex.from_arrays([['a', 'a', 'b', 'b'], [1, 2, 1, 2]],
              names=['first', 'second'])

In [27]: df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.rand(len(index)), index=index,columns=['A'])

In [7]: df.index.lexsort_depth
Out[7]: 2

In [28]: df.set_value(('a',1),'A',1)
Out[28]: 
                     A
first second          
a     1       1.000000
      2       0.136456
b     1       0.712612
      2       0.818473

And if I sort by the 2nd level (so its unsorted)

In [29]: df2 = df.sortlevel(level='second')

# this is not sorted! (well it is, just not lexsorted)
In [10]: df2.index.lexsort_depth
Out[10]: 0

In [30]: df2.set_value(('b','1'),'A',2)
Out[30]: 
            A
a 1  1.000000
b 1  0.712612
a 2  0.136456
b 2  0.818473
  1  2.000000
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure I understand your answer. If my index is sorted, will that prevent the names list from being reset? It doesn't seem like that in your example, it looks to me like your names has gone after set_value() is run, too? –  Thriveth Mar 25 '13 at 20:36
    
in the 2nd case, just to show you what an unsorted index does! the first case is what you want, try df.sortlevel(level='first',inplace=True), try printing the sort depth, I'll update my answer –  Jeff Mar 25 '13 at 20:38
    
Ah, thank you, now I see it. I'm not sure I understand how I should do it in practice, though. My dataframe is initialized with a "dummy" row that is deleted as soon as any actual data is inserted - which for the first part is done exclusively by set_value(). At which points should I make sure the index is sorted? And do I need to do this every time I've run set_value() (that seems unnecessarily laborious...)? –  Thriveth Mar 25 '13 at 21:03
    
So, I just tested on a very simple dataframe with a well-sorted index. Using the dataframe from the second example in my question, I try running set_values() with a realistic set of parameters and get this: B.set_value(('Foo', '26-26', 'Comp1'), 'Pos', 2.435).index.names gives [None, None, None], and B.set_value(('Foo', '26-26', 'Comp1'), 'Pos', 2.435).index.lexsort_depth gives 2 So it looks like the lexsort_depth is preserved, but the names still destroyed. –  Thriveth Mar 25 '13 at 21:24
    
if your set_value operation increases the size of the frame it returns a new object; it is possible there is a bug lurking. can u give me a better idea of why u r thing to do, maybe I can give u r a better answer. if u r setting a lot of values like this it will be somewhat inefficient. oftentimes it's better to create a new frame and perform a join/ concat operation –  Jeff Mar 26 '13 at 0:38
up vote 0 down vote accepted

So according to Andy Hayden, this is a names bug in pandas. Hopefully a fix will come soon.

Until then, I believe the best way to do this is to do the following:

tmp = df.ix['ExistingTransition'].copy()
tmp['Transition'] = 'NewTransition'
tmp = tmp.set_index('Transition', append=True)
tmp.index = tmp.index.reorder_levels([2, 0, 1])
# ...Do whatever else needs to be done to this before applying as template...
df = df.append(tmp)

...That, or making sure thet the names attribute is recreated after each run of set_values(), and then just going by the example linked in the question.

share|improve this answer
    
his frame is not sorted, see above (it should work non the less so it is 'sort'a bug) –  Jeff Mar 25 '13 at 20:53
    
I have marked this as the correct answer. It is true that the DataFrame needs to be sorted, but the problem persists even when doing so. The bug has not been squashed in Pandas 0.11 –  Thriveth Jun 3 '13 at 12:47

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