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My Goal: Create a C# class for predefined errors that have both an ID and a Message. Here was what I tried:

public class MyError
{
    public static readonly MyError OK = new MyError(0, "OK");
    public static readonly MyError Bad = new MyError(1, "Bad Stuff");

    public MyError(int id, string message)
    {
        this.Id = id;
        this.Message = message;
    }

    public readonly int Id;
    public readonly string Message;
}

This compiles just fine and I am sure it would work just fine in practice. But I always like to follow Code Analysis guidelines. In the above case, CA2104 is violated "Do not declare read only mutable reference types"

I have tried a number of things other than the above, including trying const instead of readonly (won't even compile), { get; private set; } for member access, struct instead of class, etc.

Which is the mutable type? Id or Message?

I'm open to any suggestions that accomplish what I want: Pre-defined constants for non-trivial data types.

Of course, I can always just ignore the warning but I have found that there is usually a reason for them.

* CLARIFICATION * My question is really less about this specific MyError class and more about a more fundamental problem of defining constants for stuff other than basic data types.

Suppose I want to define three constants that are doubles. C# lets me do this like so:

   public const double HighValue = 11.0;
   public const double LowValue = 0.1;
   public const double MidValue = 5.5;

C# creates a small handful of useful constants for double pre-defined for us: NaN, MinValue, MaxValue, NegativeInfinity, PositiveInfinity.

So now, what if I want to pre-define some interesting constants for three-dimensional vectors (X,Y,Z) in space? I can define constants for doubles, integers, strings, etc. but how do I define a constant for something less trivial? The Origin is an interesting constant I want to give a name to:

public class Vector3D
{
    /// The problem is that this does not work
    public const Vector3D Origin = { 0.0, 0.0, 0.0 };

    public double X;
    public double Y;
    public double Z;
}

I'm not going to need thousands of constants. Just a few like our friend double has with NaN, etc. The class doesn't need to be especially protected or sealed either. Anybody is free to create Vector3D objects and derive from it in any way they want. I just want to have a special constant named Origin that has value (0.0, 0.0, 0.0)

share|improve this question
3  
Are you sure this example is representative of your class? You don't have any other properties? (I would personally suggest making these properties rather than public fields, by the way.) Also, consider sealing your class - which prevent mutable derived classes from being created. – Jon Skeet Mar 25 '13 at 17:43
    
@JonSkeet: AFAIK, the CA rule cannot recognize immutability. – SLaks Mar 25 '13 at 17:44
    
@SLaks: That's a pity - especially as the error message specifically talks about mutable reference types, implying it can recognize immutable ones :( – Jon Skeet Mar 25 '13 at 17:50
    
the way the class has been design to return error code & msg is not good. suppose if i have 100 predefined err code & msg then i have to create 100 static instance inside the class. this idea is bogus. lot better way people can handle like put the predefine error in xml file and load data from that file when apps start. – Thomas Mar 25 '13 at 18:12
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your type is not mutable, but Code Analysis doesn't know that.
This warning is a false positive; you should suppress it.


To answer your edited question:

const can only be applied to primitives.
For custom types, static readonly is the only option.

As long as the type is properly immutable, it will work perfectly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I am marking this as the kind of answer I was looking for. – ChuckZ Mar 26 '13 at 18:13

The type is not mutable. The Code Analysis gets confused by having public readonly fields.

You can fix the code analysis issue by making your public fields public properties:

public MyError(int id, string message)
{
    this.id = id;
    this.message = message;
}
private readonly int id;
private readonly string message;
public int Id { get { return id; } }
public string Message { get { return message; } }
share|improve this answer

Your properties should not be static because every instance of this class will have their own ID and Message, do you agree?

share|improve this answer
    
Those properties aren't static; you're misunderstanding his code. Also, this isn't an answer. – SLaks Mar 25 '13 at 19:09
    
You right, they aren`t static. Fast Reading! :) – Michel Vaz Ramos Mar 25 '13 at 19:15

I would create a class that

  • is sealed, to prevent it from being inherited
  • has a private constructor, to prevent it from being instantiated from outside of the class
  • provides properties with private setters, so they cannot be set from outside.

That would give you the following code:

public sealed class MyError
{
    public static readonly MyError OK = new MyError(0, "OK");

    public static readonly MyError Bad = new MyError(1, "Bad Stuff");

    private MyError(int id, string message)
    {
        this.ID = id;
        this.Message = message;
    }

    public int ID { get; private set; }

    public string Message { get; private set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
people can not create instance and can not inherit. so i just do not understand how people use this class from out side. what kind of purpose it solve? anyone can explain...i just keen to know. thanks – Thomas Mar 25 '13 at 17:58
    
They don't need to inherit or instanicate the class themselves. The just use the values provided by MyError.OK and MyError.Bad. These two static properties provide instances of the class. The only two immutable instances that will ever exist. – Spontifixus Mar 25 '13 at 17:59
    
i have seen only 2 properties have been declared public not static.only two instance of same class has been declared as static? – Thomas Mar 25 '13 at 18:04
    
why did u declare ctor as protected instead of private....any reason behind. – Thomas Mar 25 '13 at 18:05
    
the way the class has been design to return error code & msg is not good. suppose if i have 100 predefined err code & msg then i have to create 100 static instance inside the class. this idea is bogus. lot better way people can handle like put the predefine error in xml file and load data from that file when apps start. – Thomas Mar 25 '13 at 18:12

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