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So when I write a function

void sort (int oldarray[], int length)
{

//imagine there is a function here that runs a loop and finishes with a sorted:

newarray[];
}

How do I get newarray[] to replace oldarray[] in the main function that could look like this:

int main()
{
int length = 7
int oldarray[length]

//here would be a loop that populates the oldarray

sort(oldarray[], length)

//a loop that prints the newarray[] from the sort or main function
}

FYI this isn't homework. I'm teaching myself, so you aren't helping me cheat a professor out of their hard earned money.

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If you don't sort in-place, you can memcpy the sorted array to the original. –  Daniel Fischer Mar 25 '13 at 19:02
    
Why you would want to replace an array, if you already have one? You can operate on oldarray[] elements. –  Andrejs Cainikovs Mar 25 '13 at 19:03
    
but won't it (newarray that is) be out of scope in main() in the way it is defined now? –  Pankrates Mar 25 '13 at 19:03
    
If you don't want to return it from function, make newarray global. –  Eddy_Em Mar 25 '13 at 19:03
1  
Daniel's suggestion of memcpy is correct. But is there a reason you want sort() to be void instead of returning newarray and assigning oldarray = sort(oldarray, length);? –  jonhopkins Mar 25 '13 at 19:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Following is based on Aniket's answer, but simplified:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h> 

void sort (int *oldarray, int *newarray, int length)
{
    // do your stuff, and put result in newarray
}

int main()
{
    int length = 7;
    int oldarray[length];
    int newarray[length];

    // here would be a loop that populates the oldarray

    sort(oldarray, newarray, length);

    // a loop that prints the newarray from the sort or main function

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
void sort (int *oldarray, int length, int *newarray, int *newlength)
{

//imagine there is a function here that runs a loop and finishes with a sorted:

//newarray after sorting can be passed to `main` function - even if the function returns void
// also remember to set the `newlength`
}

int main()
{
  int newlength;
  int *newarray = malloc(7 * sizeof(int));
  int length = 7
  int oldarray[length]

  //here would be a loop that populates the oldarray

  sort(oldarray[], length, newarray, &newlength)

  //a loop that prints the newarray[] from the sort or main function
  free(newarray);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
int newarray[length]; –  Andrejs Cainikovs Mar 25 '13 at 19:12
    
So if you pass in a pointer as an argument, it will be returned or changed in the main function? –  user2208569 Mar 25 '13 at 19:12
    
@user2208569, what Aniket wanted to tell is that pointers are static, they point to the fixed memory location, while you actually can change stuff that they point to. –  Andrejs Cainikovs Mar 25 '13 at 19:13
    
@user2208569, my version of this code would be: codepad.org/5Bnb06vj –  Andrejs Cainikovs Mar 25 '13 at 19:16

you don't want to put [] on your call to sort:

sort(oldarray, length)

If you really don't want to return anything from the sort function instead of passing in an array, which is really just a pointer, you want to pass in a pointer to a pointer and then re-assign what the pointer points to (phew). Like so:

int ** pointer_to_arr = &old; //& gives address of old
sort(pointer_to_arr, length);

In sort:

sort(int** arr, int len) {
    //you need to malloc the new array if you don't want it
    //to go away on function return:
    int* new_array = (int*) malloc(len*sizeof(int));
    //... sort here into new_array ...
    *arr = new_array; //set arr to the newly sorted array 
}

You can now access new_array from pointer_to_old:

int* new_array = *pointer_to_arr;
 //... do what you will
//don't forget to release you memory when you're done
free (new_array);
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