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So I'm trying to figure out how to append a string to the end of a string that occurs mid-line within a file and has a variable in between. What would be the best way to achieve this?

Sample string

depends = object_OBJA object_OBJB place_PLACEA place_PLACEB

what i want to return

depends = object_OBJA object_OBJB place_PLACEA[RANGE] place_PLACEB[RANGE]

I've tried using a regular expression but i can't seem to get it to skip the PLACEA section.

example of something I've tried. I just can't seem to figure out how to preserve the PLACEA without just doing a direct replacement. Ideally I would be able to have it find the place, skip the _PLACEA and append the [RANGE] after, but it seems to just replace the entirety of the string.

perl -p -e 's/place.+?/[$"RANGE"]/ge' test.ctl
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Show us (code) what you have tried so far. –  m0skit0 Mar 25 '13 at 19:27
    
@m0skit0, sometimes i wish my brain had the patience to comment as you did rather than jumping to writing an answer... Teach a man to fish... –  Lucas Mar 25 '13 at 19:32
    
perl -p -e 's/place.+?/[$"RANGE"]/ge' test.ctl example of something I've tried. I just can't seem to figure out how to preserve the PLACEA without just doing a direct replacement. Ideally I would be able to have it find the place, skip the _PLACEA and append the [RANGE] after, but it seems to just replace the entirety of the string. –  Sjadow Mar 25 '13 at 19:39
    
Why perl? You seem to be doing it on the command line, so use sed: try sed 's/place[^ ]\+/&["RANGE"]/g' test.ctl –  FrankieTheKneeMan Mar 25 '13 at 19:43
1  
Ah. Well then. try using $& to reference the matched string. perl -p -e 's/place[^ ]+/$&[$"RANGE"]/ge' test.ctl –  FrankieTheKneeMan Mar 25 '13 at 19:48
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The \K regex operator might be interesting for you: It “forgets” that it matched the previous pattern. This is very useful for substitutions, as we can assert that a certain pattern matched, but don't actually replace the matched text. This is more convenient than look-around assertions.

This would make your substitution:

s{ place_\w+ \K }
 {[RANGE]}xg;

A test:

my $string   = "depends = object_OBJA object_OBJB place_PLACEA place_PLACEB";
my $expected = "depends = object_OBJA object_OBJB place_PLACEA[RANGE] place_PLACEB[RANGE]";

use Test::More;
(my $altered = $string) =~ s{ place_\w+ \K }{[RANGE]}xg;
ok $altered eq $expected, "correct substitution";

Notes:

  • I use \w+ to match the rest of the place_ word. This may or may not do what you want. You have to think about where exactly the [RANGE] is to be inserted.
  • Using \K is potentially more performant than using captures.
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Perhaps something like this:

$line =~ s/^(depends = object_OBJA object_OBJB place_PLACEA) (place_PLACEB)$/$1\[RANGE] $2\[RANGE]/

Assuming you wanted to match the literal string you put above.

Untested

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#!/usr/bin/env perl

use 5.012;
use strict;
use warnings;

my $s = 'depends = object_OBJA object_OBJB place_PLACEA place_PLACEB';
$s =~ s/(place_PLACE.)/${1}[RANGE]/g;

say $s;

Output:

depends = object_OBJA object_OBJB place_PLACEA[RANGE] place_PLACEB[RANGE]

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