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I'm still learning Python as I want to teach the essential concepts of the language to eleven year old kids (I work as a teacher). We have done a bit of work in basic so they understand the essentials of programming and breaking down tasks into chunks and such like. Python is the language that is going to be taught all across the UK with the new curriculum coming in and I don't want to teach the kids bad habits. Below is a little program that I have written, yep I know it's bad but any advice about improvements would be very much appreciated.

I am still plowing through tutorials on the language so please be gentle! :o)

# This sets the condition of x for later use
x=0
# This is the main part of the program
def numtest():
    print ("I am the multiplication machine")
    print ("I can do amazing things!")
    c = input ("Give me a number, a really big number!")
    c=float(c)
    print ("The number", int(c), "multiplied by itself equals",(int(c*c)))
    print("I am Python 3. I am really cool at maths!")
    if (c*c)>10000:
        print ("Wow, you really did give me a big number!")
    else:
         print ("The number you gave me was a bit small though. I like bigger stuff than that!")

# This is the part of the program that causes it to run over and over again.
while x==0:
    numtest()
    again=input("Run again? y/n >>>")
    if x=="y":
        print("")
        numtest()
    else:
        print("Goodbye")
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closed as too localized by chepner, SztupY, Emil, Carl Veazey, Graviton Mar 26 '13 at 2:38

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5  
What's your question exactly? If you're looking for a code review, codereview.stackexchange would probably be a better venue. –  mgilson Mar 25 '13 at 19:26
    
What's your question? –  wRAR Mar 25 '13 at 19:26
    
After print("Goodbye"), still inside the else, I would put x = 1 so the loop doesn't repeat itself when the user is trying to exit. Also, what others have answered, you need to check if again=="y" –  jonhopkins Mar 25 '13 at 19:27
1  
Avoid putting a space between a function call and its following parenthesis. You might (not sure) have some ambiguity with Python 2 because print ("string", 10) would be printing a tuple but print("string", 10) would be printing two values. –  Waleed Khan Mar 25 '13 at 19:28

4 Answers 4

You don't seem to need the variable x

while True:
    numtest()
    again = input("Run again? y/n >>>")
    if again == "y":       # test "again", not "x"
        print("")
    else:
        print("Goodbye")
        break              # This will exit the while loop
share|improve this answer
    
As written, this will call numtest() twice in succession without asking in between if you want to run it again. I don't think the first if branch adds anything. –  DSM Mar 25 '13 at 19:35
    
@DSM good spotting. It just adds a blank line now –  John La Rooy Mar 25 '13 at 19:37
    
Thank you. In a few lines you have helped me out with the while true command and introduced me to the command 'break' thanks. –  Kirk Rogers Mar 26 '13 at 17:06

Since you wish to teach good style:

  1. Don't use variable names like x unless you are creating a graph. See PEP008 for naming conventions and style.

  2. Be consistent with your spaces:

    c = input ("Give me a number, a really big number!")
    
    c=float(c)
    

is not consistent. Which is better style?

If you really want an infinite loop then:

    while True:
        numtest()

        again = input("Run again? y/n >>>")

        if again.lower().startswith("n"):
            print("Goodbye")
            break

Then again, some people think that using break is bad style, do your agree? How would you rewrite the loop so break is not used? An exercise for your students maybe?

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 because you trailed a question after all your comments, thus keeping to the pedagogical point. –  kojiro Mar 25 '13 at 19:46
    
Thanks for the advice. I think I posted in the wrong forum but hey ho! I've no idea (at the moment) how to rewrite so break is not used except stick it at the end and hope for the best :o) The level I am working at with the kids is very simple, just introducing them to the language. They are only nine years old! –  Kirk Rogers Mar 26 '13 at 17:09
1  
@KirkRogers: Since your students are "only" nine years old then you have an even greater responsibility to show readable, clear, code. If you show an impenetrable mess then you might put them off or make them think that sloppy is OK. Lessons learn at that age stay with you the rest of your life, and are difficult to break later. –  cdarke Mar 27 '13 at 7:23

you have to break the loop

your while should be

while again == 'y':

thereby

again = 'y'


def numtest():
    print ("I am the multiplication machine")
    print ("I can do amazing things!")
    c = input("Give me a number, a really big number!")
    c = float(c)
    print ("The number", int(c), "multiplied by itself equals", (int(c * c)))
    print("I am Python 3. I am really cool at maths!")
    if (c * c) > 10000:
        print ("Wow, you really did give me a big number!")
    else:
        print ("The number you gave me was a bit small though. I like bigger stuff than that!")

# This is the part of the program that causes it to run over and over again.
while again == 'y':
    numtest()
    again = input("Run again? y/n >>>")
    if again != "y":
        print("Goodbye")
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this. It really helped a lot. Very clear and makes sense. –  Kirk Rogers Mar 26 '13 at 17:11

Some hopefully useful commentary:

Use a docstring instead of a comment to describe your function

def numtest():
    """Use a docstring. This is the main part of the program. Explain what a function is and why you want to use it. (Because it gives you scope and lets you simplify a complex set of procedures into a single operation.)"""

Use consistent style for your code and try to get your students to follow it, too.

If you're not absolutely sure what style to follow, use PEP-8. (In your case there are differences in how you treat whitespace in the same operation on different lines.)

print ("The number", int(c), "multiplied by itself equals",(int(c*c)))
print("I am Python 3. I am really cool at maths!")

Why make a float here and an int later on?

It might be useful to teach how computers treat floating point operations differently from integer operations, but that's not really illustrated here.

c = float(c)
print("The number", int(c), "multiplied by itself equals", (int(c*c)))

You call numtest twice in the loop

Try this instead:

again = "y"
while again == "y":
    numtest()
    again = input("Run again? y/n >>>")
    print("")

# Take this out of the loop.
print("Goodbye")
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help. I think I posted this in the wrong section and should have used code review, whoops. I have planned some stuff on how python works with numbers but I know they are going to get really confused between float and integers, they are only 9-11 years old. Still, they picked up basic well enough at the age of seven and eight so time to give them a push! Thanks again. –  Kirk Rogers Mar 26 '13 at 17:17
    
To be sure, @KirkRogers, it's not how just Python works with numbers. It's how floating point arithmetic works, and very few programming languages don't work that way. It would be hard to give a really good treatment of that without teaching some binary math, though. –  kojiro Mar 26 '13 at 17:32
    
Thanks for your advice. we have done some work with binary mathematics though probably nowhere at the level you are thinking of. The biggest problem I am going to face is how Python deals with numbers. –  Kirk Rogers Mar 26 '13 at 21:37
    
For example, In BASIC INT means just knock off everything after the decimal point but in Python a variable can be defined as int. The float of the number will always be x.o –  Kirk Rogers Mar 26 '13 at 21:38
    
I'll give you an example; when we write a program in basic to check the divisibility of a number we compared the integer of a division by the original answer of the division. If the two were the same, then that number was a multiple of x. . Ie. 10/2 is the same as the integer of 10/2 so ten is a multiple of 2. In python though, this language is totally out the window. The number has to be converted to a float and the when you compare the float to the integer you are comparing 5.0 to 5 Obviously not the same. How do you do it? I am almost ripping my hair out here. :o) Thank you & Regards Kirk –  Kirk Rogers Mar 26 '13 at 21:39

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