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I've been trying to fit an exponential to some data for a while using scipy.optimize.curve_fit but i'm having real difficulty. I really can't see any reason why this wouldn't work but it just produces a strait line, no idea why!

Any help would be much appreciated

from __future__ import division
import numpy
from scipy.optimize import curve_fit
import matplotlib.pyplot as pyplot

def func(x,a,b,c):
   return a*numpy.exp(-b*x)-c


yData = numpy.load('yData.npy')
xData = numpy.load('xData.npy')

trialX = numpy.linspace(xData[0],xData[-1],1000)

# Fit a polynomial 
fitted = numpy.polyfit(xData, yData, 10)[::-1]
y = numpy.zeros(len(trailX))
for i in range(len(fitted)):
   y += fitted[i]*trialX**i

# Fit an exponential
popt, pcov = curve_fit(func, xData, yData)
yEXP = func(trialX, *popt)

pyplot.figure()
pyplot.plot(xData, yData, label='Data', marker='o')
pyplot.plot(trialX, yEXP, 'r-',ls='--', label="Exp Fit")
pyplot.plot(trialX,   y, label = '10 Deg Poly')
pyplot.legend()
pyplot.show()

enter image description here

xData = [1e-06, 2e-06, 3e-06, 4e-06,
5e-06, 6e-06, 7e-06, 8e-06,
9e-06, 1e-05, 2e-05, 3e-05,
4e-05, 5e-05, 6e-05, 7e-05,
8e-05, 9e-05, 0.0001, 0.0002,
0.0003, 0.0004, 0.0005, 0.0006,
0.0007, 0.0008, 0.0009, 0.001,
0.002, 0.003, 0.004, 0.005,
0.006, 0.007, 0.008, 0.009, 0.01]

yData = 
[6.37420666067e-09, 1.13082012115e-08,
1.52835756975e-08, 2.19214493931e-08, 2.71258852882e-08, 3.38556130078e-08, 3.55765277358e-08,
4.13818145846e-08, 4.72543475372e-08, 4.85834751151e-08, 9.53876562077e-08, 1.45110636413e-07,
1.83066627931e-07, 2.10138415308e-07, 2.43503982686e-07, 2.72107045549e-07, 3.02911771395e-07,
3.26499455951e-07, 3.48319349445e-07, 5.13187669283e-07, 5.98480176303e-07, 6.57028222701e-07,
6.98347073045e-07, 7.28699930335e-07, 7.50686502279e-07, 7.7015576866e-07, 7.87147246927e-07,
7.99607141001e-07, 8.61398763228e-07, 8.84272900407e-07, 8.96463883243e-07, 9.04105135329e-07,
9.08443443149e-07, 9.12391264185e-07, 9.150842683e-07, 9.16878548643e-07, 9.18389990067e-07]
share|improve this question
    
I get multiple errors when I try to run your code- first, trialX is misspelled, and then I get an operands could not be broadcast together with shapes error. Are you sure this is your exact code? –  David Robinson Mar 25 '13 at 20:32
    
@DavidRobinson: to deal with the operands issue, make sure xData and yData are both ndarrays. –  DSM Mar 25 '13 at 20:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Numerical algorithms tend to work better when not fed extremely small (or large) numbers.

In this case, the graph shows your data has extremely small x and y values. If you scale them, the fit is remarkable better:

xData = np.load('xData.npy')*10**5
yData = np.load('yData.npy')*10**5

from __future__ import division

import os
os.chdir(os.path.expanduser('~/tmp'))

import numpy as np
import scipy.optimize as optimize
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

def func(x,a,b,c):
   return a*np.exp(-b*x)-c


xData = np.load('xData.npy')*10**5
yData = np.load('yData.npy')*10**5

print(xData.min(), xData.max())
print(yData.min(), yData.max())

trialX = np.linspace(xData[0], xData[-1], 1000)

# Fit a polynomial 
fitted = np.polyfit(xData, yData, 10)[::-1]
y = np.zeros(len(trialX))
for i in range(len(fitted)):
   y += fitted[i]*trialX**i

# Fit an exponential
popt, pcov = optimize.curve_fit(func, xData, yData)
print(popt)
yEXP = func(trialX, *popt)

plt.figure()
plt.plot(xData, yData, label='Data', marker='o')
plt.plot(trialX, yEXP, 'r-',ls='--', label="Exp Fit")
plt.plot(trialX, y, label = '10 Deg Poly')
plt.legend()
plt.show()

enter image description here

Note that after rescaling xData and yData, the parameters returned by curve_fit must also be rescaled. In this case, a, b and c each must be divided by 10**5 to obtain fitted parameters for the original data.


One objection you might have to the above is that the scaling has to be chosen rather "carefully". (Read: Not every reasonable choice of scale works!)

You can improve the robustness of curve_fit by providing a reasonable initial guess for the parameters. Usually you have some a priori knowledge about the data which can motivate ballpark / back-of-the envelope type guesses for reasonable parameter values.

For example, calling curve_fit with

guess = (-1, 0.1, 0)
popt, pcov = optimize.curve_fit(func, xData, yData, guess)

helps improve the range of scales on which curve_fit succeeds in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
That's much better! is there a reason that it doesn't like small numbers? –  user1696811 Mar 25 '13 at 20:47
2  
I haven't studied curve_fit's algorithm closely enough to tell you exactly why. But in general, these algorithms need to test a guess for the parameter values, then tweak the guess. The size of initial tweak may work well if the data have magnitude around 1, but may overshoot the correct answer completely if the data has magnitude around 10**-6. –  unutbu Mar 25 '13 at 20:56
1  
@unutbu You were right about the initial guess being around 1. From docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy/reference/generated/… p0 : None, scalar, or M-length sequence Initial guess for the parameters. If None, then the initial values will all be 1 (if the number of parameters for the function can be determined using introspection, otherwise a ValueError is raised). Where scipy.optimize.curve_fit(f, xdata, ydata, p0=None, sigma=None, **kw)[source] –  ffledgling Aug 21 '13 at 16:49

A (slight) improvement to this solution, not accounting for a priori knowledge of the data might be the following: Take the inverse-mean of the data set and use that as the "scale factor" to be passed to the underlying leastsq() called by curve_fit(). This allows the fitter to work and returns the parameters on the original scale of the data.

The relevant line is:

popt, pcov = curve_fit(func, xData, yData)

which becomes:

popt, pcov = curve_fit(func, xData, yData,
    diag=(1./xData.mean(),1./yData.mean()) )

Here is the full example which produces this image:

curve_fit without manually rescaling the data or results

from __future__ import division
import numpy
from scipy.optimize import curve_fit
import matplotlib.pyplot as pyplot

def func(x,a,b,c):
   return a*numpy.exp(-b*x)-c


xData = numpy.array([1e-06, 2e-06, 3e-06, 4e-06, 5e-06, 6e-06,
7e-06, 8e-06, 9e-06, 1e-05, 2e-05, 3e-05, 4e-05, 5e-05, 6e-05,
7e-05, 8e-05, 9e-05, 0.0001, 0.0002, 0.0003, 0.0004, 0.0005,
0.0006, 0.0007, 0.0008, 0.0009, 0.001, 0.002, 0.003, 0.004, 0.005
, 0.006, 0.007, 0.008, 0.009, 0.01])

yData = numpy.array([6.37420666067e-09, 1.13082012115e-08,
1.52835756975e-08, 2.19214493931e-08, 2.71258852882e-08,
3.38556130078e-08, 3.55765277358e-08, 4.13818145846e-08,
4.72543475372e-08, 4.85834751151e-08, 9.53876562077e-08,
1.45110636413e-07, 1.83066627931e-07, 2.10138415308e-07,
2.43503982686e-07, 2.72107045549e-07, 3.02911771395e-07,
3.26499455951e-07, 3.48319349445e-07, 5.13187669283e-07,
5.98480176303e-07, 6.57028222701e-07, 6.98347073045e-07,
7.28699930335e-07, 7.50686502279e-07, 7.7015576866e-07,
7.87147246927e-07, 7.99607141001e-07, 8.61398763228e-07,
8.84272900407e-07, 8.96463883243e-07, 9.04105135329e-07,
9.08443443149e-07, 9.12391264185e-07, 9.150842683e-07,
9.16878548643e-07, 9.18389990067e-07])

trialX = numpy.linspace(xData[0],xData[-1],1000)

# Fit a polynomial
fitted = numpy.polyfit(xData, yData, 10)[::-1]
y = numpy.zeros(len(trialX))
for i in range(len(fitted)):
   y += fitted[i]*trialX**i

# Fit an exponential
popt, pcov = curve_fit(func, xData, yData,
    diag=(1./xData.mean(),1./yData.mean()) )
yEXP = func(trialX, *popt)

pyplot.figure()
pyplot.plot(xData, yData, label='Data', marker='o')
pyplot.plot(trialX, yEXP, 'r-',ls='--', label="Exp Fit")
pyplot.plot(trialX,   y, label = '10 Deg Poly')
pyplot.legend()
pyplot.show()
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice addition to the answer! A priori knowledge may pretty much always be available when doing interactive analysis, it is not always the case with automated setups. –  PhilMacKay Jul 22 '13 at 17:25

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