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I thought I'd found a good solution to not reading in values that were too big for the array.

I'm using this code (I know its not perfect; it is mainly just demonstrative of my problem):

char myString[25][10]

while(fscanf(fp, "%24s", myString[i]) != EOF && i < MAX){
    i++;
}

To take the input and read it into the array. If the line is longer than 25 characters it splits it and puts the longer piece on the next part of the 2d array (row). Which works ok, until you get near the end, so you on row number 8 and you get a line that is 75 long, it wants to split this into 3 rows in the array. But you only have space in the array for two more rows, so it crashes.

I'm stuck as to how to take that line in a dynamic way. I don't have to do it in a while loop but how do I get the next line and measure its length. How do you do these read operations and malloc on the fly?

share|improve this question
    
You can use realloc to make the array bigger each time and just call fscanf at a different offset in myString until you reach the end of the string. –  Jesus Ramos Mar 25 '13 at 21:10
3  
You declared an array of 25 strings each of 10 bytes including the terminal null. You're reading up to 26 (sic!) bytes into each 10-byte string. This does not lead to happiness. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 25 '13 at 21:11
    
Yes I know, its not perfect its just a demonstration of what I'm trying to work with. @Jeus do you have a example? –  Eric Banderhide Mar 25 '13 at 21:17
    
What Jonathan says, but also : while( i < MAX && fscanf(fp, "%24s", myString[i]) != EOF ){} (short circuit) Also: what is MAX? –  wildplasser Mar 25 '13 at 22:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Fixed size array of dynamic strings using fgets()

Using fgets()strdup() is the only not fully portable part here:

char *data[10];
int   i;                             // Needs to last longer than the loop

for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    char buffer[4096];
    if (fgets(buffer, sizeof(buffer), fp) == 0)
        break;
    buffer[strlen(buffer)-1] = '\0'; // Zap last character; normally newline
    data[i] = strdup(buffer);        // Error check allocation?
}

This could run into problems if a lunatic uses it to read a large JSON file with a single line of data that's more than 4095 characters. For most purposes, it is unlikely you'll come across lines of 4 KiB, but that's your judgement call.

Fixed size array of dynamic strings using getline()

Using POSIX 2008 getline() — different portability problem:

char *data[10];
int   i;

for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    char   *buffer = 0;
    size_t  buflen = 0;
    ssize_t actlen;
    if ((actlen = getline(&buffer, &buflen, fp)) < 0)
        break;
    buffer[actlen-1] = '\0';       // Zap last character; normally newline
    data[i] = buffer;
}

This doesn't impose any upper limit on the length of the lines, and getline() allocates all the space.

Note that I didn't check that the zapped character was a newline in either fragment. You can (arguably should) add that check. You could have a file that doesn't have a newline at the end; it isn't technically a text file (they always end with a newline), but it is valid on Unix systems.

Fixed size array of fixed size strings

Staying with pre-allocated memory:

char data[10][26];
int  i;

for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    if (fscanf(fp, "%25s", data[i]) != 1)
        break;
    int c;  // Gobble new line
    while ((c = getc(fp)) != EOF && c != '\n')
        ;
}

Note that this reads words, not lines. It stops at white space. To read lines, you'd use a scan set conversion specification:

   if (fscanf(fp, "%25[^\n]", data[i] != 1)

You then have to decide whether to gobble the rest of the line, as before, or whether to insert a subtle but crucial space in " %25[^\n]" to gobble white space (to eat up white space before starting the conversion).

Dynamic Array of Dynamic Strings

char   **data   = 0;
size_t   numstr = 0;  /* Number of strings in use */
size_t   maxstr = 0;  /* Number of pointers allocated */

char   *buffer = 0;
size_t  buflen = 0;
ssize_t actlen;

while ((actlen = getline(&buffer, &buflen, fp)) > 0)
{
    if (numstr >= maxstr)
    {
        assert(numstr == maxstr);
        size_t newnum = maxstr * 2 + 2;
        void  *newspc = realloc(data, newnum * sizeof(char *));
        if (newspc == 0)
        {
            /* memory allocation failed - data still valid */
            break;
        }
        maxstr = newnum;
        data = newspc;
    }
    buffer[actlen-1] = '\0';       // Zap last character; normally newline
    data[numstr++] = buffer;
    buffer = 0;                    // Reset so getline() allocates on next read
    buflen = 0;
}

Not everyone approves of using realloc() to initially allocate and then reallocate memory space; you can do a malloc() before the loop if you prefer. The 2 * maxstr + 2 ensures you get a non-zero count on the first allocation (2, in fact), and is small enough to test the reallocation code (a good idea). Doubling each time amortizes the cost of the allocations. After the loop, you could reallocate-to-shrink the data array to the actual size:

realloc(data, numstr * sizeof(char *));

You should check that it didn't fail, but it shouldn't ever do so. Whether it is really worth doing that is debatable.


Warning

A variant of the code above has now been formally tested with a compiler and a test program. The SSCCE is shown below.

Note that the allocated memory is not freed above (or below). Always ensure that you know when allocated memory will be freed. Generally, that means you need a suitable function to do the job; it is usually not acceptable just to let the O/S free the memory when the program exits.

SSCCE (Short, Self-Contained, Correct Example)

#include <assert.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>

static void dump_strings(FILE *fp, const char *tag, size_t num, char **data)
{
    fprintf(fp, "%s:\n", tag);
    for (size_t i = 0; i < num; i++)
        fprintf(fp, " %2zu: [%s]\n", i, data[i]);
}

static void func1(FILE *fp)
{
    char *data[10];
    int   i;                             // Needs to last longer than the loop

    for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        char buffer[4096];
        if (fgets(buffer, sizeof(buffer), fp) == 0)
            break;
        buffer[strlen(buffer)-1] = '\0'; // Zap last character; normally newline
        data[i] = strdup(buffer);        // Error check allocation?
    }
    dump_strings(stdout, "func1", i, data);
    /* Leak! */
}

static void func2(FILE *fp)
{
    char *data[10];
    int   i;

    for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        char   *buffer = 0;
        size_t  buflen = 0;
        ssize_t actlen;
        if ((actlen = getline(&buffer, &buflen, fp)) < 0)
            break;
        buffer[actlen-1] = '\0';       // Zap last character; normally newline
        data[i] = buffer;
    }
    dump_strings(stdout, "func2", i, data);
    /* Leak! */
}

static void func3(FILE *fp)
{
    char   data[10][26];
    size_t i;

    for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        if (fscanf(fp, "%25[^\n]", data[i]) != 1)
            break;
        int c;
        while ((c = getc(fp)) != EOF && c != '\n')
            ;
    }
    printf("%s:\n", "func3");
    for (size_t j = 0; j < i; j++)
        printf("%2zu: [%s]\n", j, data[j]);
}

static void func4(FILE *fp)
{
    char   **data   = 0;
    size_t   numstr = 0;  /* Number of strings in use */
    size_t   maxstr = 0;  /* Number of pointers allocated */

    char    *buffer = 0;
    size_t   buflen = 0;
    ssize_t  actlen;

    while ((actlen = getline(&buffer, &buflen, fp)) > 0)
    {
        if (numstr >= maxstr)
        {
            assert(numstr == maxstr);
            size_t newnum = maxstr * 2 + 2;
            void  *newspc = realloc(data, newnum * sizeof(char *));
            if (newspc == 0)
            {
                /* memory allocation failed - data still valid */
                break;
            }
            maxstr = newnum;
            data = newspc;
        }
        buffer[actlen-1] = '\0';       // Zap last character; normally newline
        data[numstr++] = buffer;
        buffer = 0;                    // Reset so getline() allocates on next read
        buflen = 0;
    }
    dump_strings(stdout, "func4", numstr, data);
    /* Leak! */
}

int main(void)
{
    func1(stdin);
    func2(stdin);
    func3(stdin);
    func4(stdin);
    return(0);
}

Apart from leaking like a sieve, valgrind says this is OK. It was primarily tested on its own source code.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Jonathan, I'm starting to understand. How can I use strdup with a char declared as myStrings [25][10] I tried adding the star before the name? –  Eric Banderhide Mar 25 '13 at 21:30
    
You can't. If you're using a fixed size array like char myStrings[10][26];, you can't use dynamic memory allocation to fix it up. Either you go fixed size, or you go dynamic. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 25 '13 at 21:33
    
Thanks for all your help Jon, I got there in the end! –  Eric Banderhide Mar 25 '13 at 22:03
// assume the file is open in binary
fseek(fp, 0, SEEK_END);
size_t fpSize = ftell(fp);
char * myBuffer = new char[fpSize];
fseek(fp, 0, SEEK_SET);
fread(myBuffer, 1, fpsize, fp);
char * line = strtok(myBuffer, "\n");
while(line != 0)
{
   process(line);
}
delete [] myBuffer;

If you are actually programming in C, allocate your variables first and use malloc rather than new, and free rather than delete[].

If you are actually programming in C++ consider using C++ I/O and reading into a std::string.

share|improve this answer
    
The question is tagged C, not C++. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 25 '13 at 21:37

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