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Searching for the title of this question gives me a number of people quoting the same error, but under different circumstances, and unfortunately the answers there provided are specific to their situation, and I do not see how they can help me.

I am trying to overload operator<< for a template class. Following is a test case:

Vector.h:

#ifndef __INCL_VECTOR_H__
#define __INCL_VECTOR_H__

#include <array>

template < class T, unsigned int N >
class Vector
{
public:
    Vector();
    Vector( std::array< T, N > );

    template < class U, unsigned int M > friend Vector< U, M > operator+ ( const Vector< U, M >&, const Vector< U, M >& );

    template < class U, unsigned int M > friend std::ostream& operator<< ( std::ostream&, Vector< U, M >& );

    T& operator[] ( const unsigned int& );

protected:
    std::array< T, N > _values;
};

#include "Vector.hpp"

#endif

Vector.hpp:

#include "Vector.h"
#include <iostream>

template < class T, unsigned int N >
Vector< T, N >::Vector()
{
}

template < class T, unsigned int N >
Vector< T, N >::Vector( std::array< T, N > otherArray )
{
    _values = *( new std::array< T, N >( otherArray ) );
}

template < class U, unsigned int M >
Vector< U, M > operator+ ( const Vector< U, M > &lhVector, const Vector< U, M > &rhVector )
{
    Vector< U, M > sumVector;

    for( unsigned int i = 0; i < M; i++ )
        sumVector[i] = lhVector[i] + rhVector[i];

    return sumVector;
}

template < class U, unsigned int M >
std::ostream& operator<< ( std::ostream &out, Vector< U, M > &cVector )
{
    out << "< ";

    for( int i = M - 1; i >= 0; i-- )
    {
        out << cVector[i];
        if( i )
            out << ", ";
    }

    out << " >";

    return out;
}

template < class T, unsigned int N >
T& Vector< T, N >::operator[] ( const unsigned int &index )
{
    return _values[ index ];
}

vectorTest.cpp:

#include "Vector.h"

#include <iostream>
#include <array>

using namespace std;

int main( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
    Vector< int, 3 > u( array< int, 3 > {  1, 4,  2 } );
    Vector< int, 3 > v( array< int, 3 > { -2, 3, -1 } );

    cout << "u = " << u << endl;
    cout << "v = " << v << endl;
    cout << "u + v = " << u + v << endl;

    return 0;
}

The line which causes the error is cout << "u + v = " << u + v << endl;; the previous two lines work as expected.

The error message is as follows (compiling as g++ -std=c++11 Vector.h vectorTest.cpp):

vectorTest.cpp: In function ‘int main(int, char**)’:
vectorTest.cpp:15:31: error: cannot bind ‘std::basic_ostream<char>’ lvalue to ‘std::basic_ostream<char>&&’
In file included from /usr/include/c++/4.7/iostream:40:0,
                 from Vector.hpp:2,
                 from Vector.h:34:
/usr/include/c++/4.7/ostream:600:5: error:   initializing argument 1 of ‘std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>&&, const _Tp&) [with _CharT = char; _Traits = std::char_traits<char>; _Tp = Vector<int, 3u>]’
In file included from Vector.h:34:0:
Vector.hpp: In instantiation of ‘Vector<U, M> operator+(const Vector<U, M>&, const Vector<U, M>&) [with U = int; unsigned int M = 3u]’:
vectorTest.cpp:15:31:   required from here
Vector.hpp:40:9: error: passing ‘const Vector<int, 3u>’ as ‘this’ argument of ‘T& Vector<T, N>::operator[](const unsigned int&) [with T = int; unsigned int N = 3u]’ discards qualifiers [-fpermissive]
Vector.hpp:40:9: error: passing ‘const Vector<int, 3u>’ as ‘this’ argument of ‘T& Vector<T, N>::operator[](const unsigned int&) [with T = int; unsigned int N = 3u]’ discards qualifiers [-fpermissive]

I'm unable to understand what these error messages are telling me. I'd appreciate any assistance.

share|improve this question
    
operator[] is non-const, but an attempt is being made to use it on a const Vector which is illegal. –  hmjd Mar 25 '13 at 21:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

FIRST PROBLEM:

To make your program compile, just use an lvalue reference to const as the second parameter of your operator << (both in the friend-declaration and in the definition of that function):

template < class U, unsigned int M >
std::ostream& operator<< ( std::ostream &out, Vector< U, M > const& cVector )
//                                                           ^^^^^

The reason why your program won't compile is that your overload of operator << accepts an lvalue reference to non-const as its second argument, and lvalue references to non-const cannot bind to rvalues.

Since the result of operator + between two instances of Vector is a temporary, and a temporary is an rvalue, the compiler can't invoke your operator <<, and is therefore unable to resolve the call.

SECOND PROBLEM:

Once you fixed the above issue, you'll have to solve a second one: your Vector class template does not provide a const version of operator [], so your rewritten operator <<, which now accepts a reference to a const vector, won't be able to access the vector's elements.

template < class T, unsigned int N >
class Vector
{
    // ...

    T& operator[] ( const unsigned int& );

    T const& operator[] ( const unsigned int& ) const; // <== ADD THIS!

    // ...
};

And of course the corresponding definition:

template < class T, unsigned int N >
T const& Vector< T, N >::operator[] ( const unsigned int &index ) const
{
    return _values[ index ];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for going above and beyond what was required to fix my immediate problem. My code compiles and runs perfectly, after having made the adjustments you suggested. If I could ask a question: in the function header T const& operator[] ( const unsigned int& ) const, I know what the first const does, and what the second one does, but not the one at the end. Could you explain the function of that last const for me, or send me a link to a place where I can garner understanding? –  Arandur Mar 26 '13 at 16:19
    
@Arandur: Glad it helped :) The last const applies to the implicit this pointer and basically guarantees that the function isn't going to modify the object (if you try to alter the value of a data member in a const member function, the compiler will issue an error - with the exception of mutable members, but that's another story). You could check this link for an example, or google for "C++ const member functions" and follow the first links. Or even better, consider buying a good introductory book on C++. –  Andy Prowl Mar 26 '13 at 16:43
    
@Arandur: For a list of C++ books of all levels, follow this link. And good luck ;) –  Andy Prowl Mar 26 '13 at 16:44
    
Oh, a good introductory book on C++. That might help a bit. I learn C++ at a community college, so my foundation is a little lacking. Thank you for all your advice, and again for your help! –  Arandur Mar 27 '13 at 2:38

Change this:

std::ostream& operator<< ( std::ostream&, Vector< U, M >& );

to this:

std::ostream& operator<< ( std::ostream&, const Vector< U, M >& );
//                                        ^^^^^

The compiler is telling you that C++ will not let you bind a temporary Vector such as u + v to a non-const Vector&.

And you don't modify that Vector, so it should be const to begin with.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. However, I had to give preference to Andy Prowl for also correcting the problem I didn't know I had. –  Arandur Mar 26 '13 at 16:21
    
@Arandur you're welcome! I agree - he went the extra mile for you. –  Drew Dormann Mar 26 '13 at 16:23

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