Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Using GTK and C, how can I start/stop a long calculation (in a seperate thread) using a button? I have working code that does just that but I have little confidence that it isa reasonable method (i.e., "right").

I have a single button whose label toggles from "start" to "stop". I also have a global pthread_t variable to store a thread. My approach is to either launch or cancel a thread through the button's clicked signal handler depending on the value of a global boolean-like "idle" flag which indicates if the thread is currently running or not.

I wanted a working well-designed minimum test case so that I can easily understand the code to adapt for a larger program. This question is very similar to Python&PyGTK: Stop while on button click but that question is in python which I don't know.

My code --- posted below --- seems to work but I'm not confident in it because I can easily bring the system to its knees by just clicking the start/stop button a few times in rapid succession.

I'd be curious to see how others would (independently) solve this, how their approach compares to mine, and also a code-review for my own approach if it is actually a decent way.

#include <gtk/gtk.h>
#include <pthread.h>

/* suppress unused variable warnings */
#define UNUSED(x) (void)(x)

typedef struct _Data {
    GtkWidget *window1,
              *button1;
    gint idle;
    pthread_t calcthread;
} Data;

static Data *data;

void *calcfunc(void *arg) {
    int i;
    UNUSED(arg);

    data->idle=FALSE;
    gtk_button_set_label(GTK_BUTTON(data->button1),"Stop");

    /* This is intended to simulated a long calculation that may finish.
       Adjust the limit as needed */
    for(i=1;i<2e9;++i) {
    }

    data->idle=TRUE;
    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

/* this is our click event handler.... it suppose to start or stop 
   the "calcthread" depending on the value of the "idle" flag */
void on_button1_clicked(GtkWidget *widget, Data *ldata) {
    int ret;
    UNUSED(widget);
    UNUSED(ldata);

    if ( data->idle==TRUE ) {
        printf("idle.. starting thread\n");
        ret=pthread_create( &data->calcthread, NULL, calcfunc, NULL);
        if ( ret !=0 ) {
            g_error("ERROR: could not create thread\n");
        }
    } else {
        printf("not idle... canceling thread...");
        ret= pthread_cancel( data->calcthread );
        if ( ret != 0 ) {
            g_error("ERROR: could not cancel thread\n");
        } else {
            printf("canceled\n");
        }
        data->idle=TRUE;
        gtk_button_set_label(GTK_BUTTON(data->button1),"start");
    }
}

/* just defines our setup */
int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {

    g_thread_init(NULL);
    gdk_threads_init();
    gdk_threads_enter();

    gtk_init(&argc, &argv);

    data=g_slice_new0(Data);
    data->idle=TRUE; /* initial state */

    printf("idle is %d\n",data->idle);

    /* add widgets and objects to our structure */

    data->window1=gtk_window_new(GTK_WINDOW_TOPLEVEL);
    gtk_window_set_default_size(GTK_WINDOW(data->window1),250,250);
    data->button1=gtk_button_new_with_label("Start");
    gtk_container_add(GTK_CONTAINER(data->window1),GTK_WIDGET(data->button1));

    gtk_signal_connect(GTK_OBJECT(data->window1), "delete-event",
                       gtk_main_quit, NULL);
    gtk_signal_connect(GTK_OBJECT(data->button1), "clicked",
                           G_CALLBACK(on_button1_clicked), NULL);

    gtk_widget_show_all(GTK_WIDGET(data->window1));

    gtk_main();

    /* Don't forget to free the memory! */
    g_slice_free(Data, data);

    gdk_threads_leave();

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
You have some race conditions here, for example, your callback checks the idle flag and spawns the thread, but at that point the callback could run once again and check idle before calcfunc has a chance to run (the scheduler is allowed to do whatever it wants with regard to order of thread execution), and then you've spawned two threads but no longer have a handle to the first. It's probably better to have the controller thread keep track of idle/running. –  CaptainMurphy Mar 25 '13 at 23:14
add comment

3 Answers

As you are calling GTK functions from the secondary thread you need to wrap the call to

gtk_button_set_label(GTK_BUTTON(data->button1),"Stop");

with gdk_threads_enter/gdk_threads_leave calls. However, it is better practice to only call GTK functions from one thread. The easiest way is with an idle function using g_idle_add as this will be called from the main thread, however in your case you could just move the call to gtk_button_set_label from calcfunc into on_button1_clicked.

You should also set data->idle = FALSE in the on_button1_clicked handler to solve the race condition where you click the button too quickly.

Another way you could do this is without threads and that is to run the GTK main loop during the long operation. In your loop you just need to pump the Gtk event loop.

for(i=1;i<2e9;++i) {
    while (gtk_events_pending ()) {
        gtk_main_iteration ();
    }
}

This means you avoid all the threading problems and needing to lock data access. You could stop the calculation by checking a boolean value each iteration which gets set in the on_button1_clicked handler.

share|improve this answer
    
An gtk_events_pending loop was how I was handling things previously. Since that function gets called every iteration, it seems like it would be very expensive. I'm currently modifying my example to utilize your advice but I'm still struggling to get it to work. –  Dr. Person Person II Mar 26 '13 at 1:20
    
According to my reading of the GDK Threads documentation, my call of gtk_button_set_label() in still inside the main GDK lock and therefore doesn't need the gdk_threads_enter/gdk_threads_leave protection. It's only needed for functions like g_idle_add that are outside the main GDK lock. –  Dr. Person Person II Mar 26 '13 at 3:52
    
All calls made need to be made inside the GDK Lock to serialise access. Look at the argument_thread function in the second example here: developer.gnome.org/gtk-faq/stable/x481.html –  iain Mar 26 '13 at 12:26
    
Also about the gtk_events_pending loop, it doesn't need to be called for every iteration but you just need to call it frequently at some point during the loop. It all depends how long the operations inside the loop take. It's not an overly expensive thing, don't forget that it's normally running all the time anyway. –  iain Mar 26 '13 at 12:28
add comment

The following code does what I asked. It uses pthreads. I don't know if it's the most elegant but it seems to work. The trick was using two flags: one for the idle state and one for a cancel request, which avoids needing to cancel the thread using the "pthread_cancel" function, which I find to be unusual in real code.

#include <gtk/gtk.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define UNUSED(x) (void)(x)

#define handle_error_en(en, msg) do { errno = en; perror(msg); exit(EXIT_FAILURE); } while (0)

typedef struct _Data {
    GtkWidget *window1,
              *button1;
} Data;

static Data *data;

static pthread_mutex_t calcmutex = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;
static pthread_t calcthread=0;

static gboolean idle=TRUE,cancel_request=FALSE;

void *calcfunc(void *arg) {
    int i,s;
    UNUSED(arg);
    g_print("\tstarting thread\n");

    s = pthread_setcancelstate(PTHREAD_CANCEL_ASYNCHRONOUS, NULL);
    if (s != 0) {
        handle_error_en(s, "pthread_setcancelstate");
    }

    gdk_threads_enter();
    gtk_button_set_label(GTK_BUTTON(data->button1),"Stop");
    gdk_threads_leave();

    g_print("\tstarting work...\n");
    for (i=0; i<100000000 ;++i) {

        /* check for cancelation */
        pthread_mutex_lock(&calcmutex);
        if ( cancel_request ) {
            g_print("\t[cancel request noted].\n");
            pthread_mutex_unlock(&calcmutex);
            break;
        }
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&calcmutex);

        /* do "calculation" */
        i=i*1*-1*1*-1;
    }
    g_print("\tdone work.\n");

    gdk_threads_enter();
    gtk_button_set_label(GTK_BUTTON(data->button1),"Start");
    gdk_threads_leave();

    pthread_mutex_lock(&calcmutex);
    cancel_request=FALSE;
    idle=TRUE;
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&calcmutex);

    g_print("\tdone thread.\n");
    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

void on_button1_clicked(GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *ldata) {
    int s;
    UNUSED(widget);
    UNUSED(ldata);
    g_print("entered on_button1_clicked\n");


    pthread_mutex_lock(&calcmutex);
    if ( idle ) {
        g_print("idle, starting thread\n");
        s = pthread_create(&calcthread, NULL, calcfunc, NULL);
        if (s != 0) {
            handle_error_en(s, "pthread_create");
        }
        idle=FALSE;
    } else {
        g_print("not idle and not first time, making canceling request.\n");
        cancel_request=TRUE;
    }
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&calcmutex);

    g_print("finished on_button1_clicked\n");
}

/* just defines our setup */
int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {

    g_thread_init(NULL);
    gdk_threads_init();
    gdk_threads_enter();

    gtk_init(&argc, &argv);

    data=g_slice_new0(Data);

    printf("initial idle is %d\n",idle);

    /* add widgets and objects to our structure */
    data->window1=gtk_window_new(GTK_WINDOW_TOPLEVEL);
    gtk_window_set_default_size(GTK_WINDOW(data->window1),250,250);
    data->button1=gtk_button_new_with_label("Start");
    gtk_container_add(GTK_CONTAINER(data->window1),GTK_WIDGET(data->button1));

    gtk_signal_connect(GTK_OBJECT(data->window1), "delete-event",
                       gtk_main_quit, NULL);
    gtk_signal_connect(GTK_OBJECT(data->button1), "clicked",
                           G_CALLBACK(on_button1_clicked), NULL);

    gtk_widget_show_all(GTK_WIDGET(data->window1));

    gtk_main();

    /* free the memory and stuff */
    g_slice_free(Data, data);
    pthread_mutex_destroy(&calcmutex);

    gdk_threads_leave();

    return 0;
}

This compiles warningless with

gcc -Wall -Wextra -Wconversion -pedantic `pkg-config --cflags --libs gtk+-2.0` start_stop.c -o start_stop
share|improve this answer
add comment

Well in Java I would call interrupt() on that Thread, the thread would then get an InterruptedException, and would be able to clean up in its exception handler's catch or finally block before exiting.

In C there is several options:

  • send that thread a signal with kill(), and have the signal handler longjmp() to a point in your code where you previously called setjmp(). For cleanup, you'd just do something when setjmp() returns non-zero, meaning it's resuming from the subsequent longjmp() call.
  • call pthread_cancel(). The only real cleanup you get here is that the cancellation handlers you previously registered with pthread_cleanup_push() will get called.
  • have either a volatile variable or a lock protected variable that gets checked periodically (for example once every loop iteration) and set to some value when the calculation should be canceled. Cleanup is easy because you can do whatever you like when the flag is set and you break out of the loop.

I dislike all of them: signals mean you have to handle partial failures (eg. short reads and writes on files and sockets) and errno==EINTR correctly everywhere in your code while avoiding all kinds of gotchas that exist with signal handlers (such as the small stack size and limits on what system calls are safe to use), pthread_cancel() means you have to drag state around between the thread function and the cancellation handlers, and the flag can impact performance since it has to read uncached memory or take a lock every time and if you don't check it often enough then the thread won't respond immediately when the flag is set.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.