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I have the following code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string>

int scan_url(const char url[], char *hostname[], int maxhostlen) {
//stuff the function does...probably not relevant to this question
}
int main() {
    char url[63] = {'\0'};
    char hostname[63] = {'\0'};
    int help = scan_url(url, &hostname, 15);
    return(0);
}

I want to pass the char array "hostname" by pointer to the function scan_url. However when I try, I get the following error:

error C2664: 'scan_url' : cannot convert parameter 2 from 'char (*)[63]' to 'char *[]'

The error highlights the third to last line of code I have posted here...specifically it underlines the "&" in the function "scan_url".

What's going on here?

EDIT:

My purpose is to return the value of hostname computed in the scan_url function.

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<string>? Is this C or C++? –  n.m. Mar 25 '13 at 23:06
    
It should be C. –  codedude Mar 25 '13 at 23:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You get the error because these are fundamentally different types. Your function is expecting a pointer-to-pointer, but this is not the same as a pointer-to-array, which is what you're trying to provide.

If you want to write into the provided character array, then simply pass a normal pointer:

int scan_url(const char url[], char hostname[], int maxhostlen) {
    strcpy(hostname, "blah");  // or whatever
}


scan_url(url, hostname, 15);
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edited per your requiest –  codedude Mar 25 '13 at 23:05
    
The assignment I'm working specifically said that the value of "hostname" should returned. Is this accomplished in your code above? –  codedude Mar 25 '13 at 23:12
    
@codedude: Yes, this will modify the contents of the hostname array in main. Try it! –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 25 '13 at 23:13
    
Hmmm. I used int x; for (x=0; x<6; x++) { printf("%c", hostname[x]); } –  codedude Mar 25 '13 at 23:17
    
But it didn't print anything. (I put it right after I call the function in main() –  codedude Mar 25 '13 at 23:18

You can declare scan_url like this:

int scan_url(const char url[], char hostname[], int maxhostlen) {

And call it like this:

int help = scan_url(url, hostname, 15);
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Usually it's redundant to specify both a pointer and array notation as a function parameter, because they're both treated the same - as a pointer. Combining them means you're trying to pass an array of pointers, or rather a pointer to pointers.

To be consistent with the rest of your declarations just take out the *:

int scan_url(const char url[], char hostname[], int maxhostlen)
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Despite the confusing, overly-suggestive syntax, that [] in your function parameters does not mean an array, it means a pointer.

So, when char url[] appears as a function parameter, url has the type of a pointer to a char and not the type of an array of chars.

Similarly, when char *hostname[] appears as a function parameter, hostname has the type of a pointer to a pointer to a char and not the type of an array of pointers to a char.

In C, arrays are never passed in their entirety to functions, you can only pass pointers to things or pointers to arrays of things, but not arrays themselves. And that [] serves just as an alternative way for saying "it's a pointer" and the benefit of using [] instead of * is that you can show the intent of passing a pointer not to a single thing, but a pointer to a thing, followed by other things like it, IOW, a pointer to an element of an array.

OTOH, if you had char something[][10] as a function parameter, something would have the type of a pointer to an array of 10 chars. The first [] would "decay" to *.

If you had char (*something)[10] as a function parameter, something would have the type of a pointer to an array of 10 chars as well. There's no "decaying" of [] to * in here because something is already a pointer.

And that's pretty much what you're trying to shove into the function when passing &hostname, since, in main(), hostname is an array of 63 chars and &hostname is a pointer to an array of 63 chars.

But, as shown earlier, the actual type of the hostname parameter in the function is a pointer to a pointer to a char.

So, what you're passing and what the function expects are incompatible things, they have radically different types: a pointer to an array of 63 chars vs a pointer to a pointer to a char. And that's the reason for the compilation error you're seeing.

You should probably change char *hostname[] to char hostname[] or to char *hostname.

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thanks for the uber-helpful reply. +1 for you! :D –  codedude Mar 26 '13 at 2:10

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