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I'm in C++, IDE is Visual Studio 2012. I have no idea why I can't do this, it makes no sense at all. I'm trying to put a struct inside of a class, as title says, but it simply will not let me do it. I've tried putting it in public, private, protected, and then tried putting it in global scope, and nothing works.

class foobar
{
public:
    struct foo
    {
        int ass;
    };

    foo bar;
    bar.ass = 1; //getting a weird error on this line
};

How would I put a struct in a class? Thanks for helping

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closed as not a real question by Nicol Bolas, talonmies, luser droog, Roman C, Jefffrey Mar 31 '13 at 8:26

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
What is the "weird error"? –  Code-Apprentice Mar 25 '13 at 23:55
6  
There is always a reason; in this case, it's that you did something wrong. Attitude adjustment required. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 26 '13 at 0:19
    
Could it be, that your assignment statement isn't in a function or method? –  Thomas Matthews Mar 26 '13 at 1:55
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2 Answers 2

If what you are trying to do is to have the ass member initialized to 1 when constructing objects of type foo, then in C++11 you can do that this way:

class foobar
{
public:

    struct foo
    {
        int ass = 1;
    //          ^^^
    };

    foo bar;
};

You can see a live example here.

The above syntax is equivalent to the more verbose constructor-based initialization, which is the only option in C++03 (and possibly also in the version of the VC11 compiler that comes with VS2012, which is known for not being fully compliant with the C++11 Standard):

class foobar
{
public:

    struct foo
    {
        foo() : ass(1) { }
    //        ^^^^^^^^

        int ass;
    };

    foo bar;
};
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C++ does not allow initializing variables inside the class declaration. You must write a constructor to do this.

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Ha, well thanks. I didn't know that you just couldn't make it in the scope of the class, I don't know why the designer of C++ made it that way, but thanks for telling me. –  Business Business Mar 26 '13 at 0:09
2  
Several reasons, all of which make sense, and are out of the scope of this comment thread. Funny story: language designers are cleverer than you. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 26 '13 at 0:20
    
@JBentley Yeah I guess that's why the language never really took off, huh? Can't wait to use yours, by the way. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 26 '13 at 0:21
    
@Lightness I fail at sarcasm, apparently :) –  JBentley Mar 26 '13 at 0:23
    
@JBentley Dammit :( –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 26 '13 at 0:24
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