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I have many unique events in XML that I have converted into a large Hash of around 300 keys. The values of most of these keys are Hashes and again, the value of some of those keys are Hashes again. I do not know how deep the hash nesting will go.

I would like to write each Hash of the original 300 and all of its keys & values (no matter how many it may have) to a schema-less database.

I have managed to write a (messy) method that outputs the values of each Hash, no matter how many Hashes its values may contain.

The problem that I am now faced with is that I am unable to determine where one Hash starts, and one Hash ends. Therefore I am unable to write separate events to the database as I am just left with the output of all my Hashes.

How can I determine which are separate events?

Here is my code:

require 'crack'
require 'awesome_print'

def printingOutHash(inputHash)
#ap inputHash
  if inputHash.kind_of?(Array)
    puts "array"
    inputHash.each do |x|
      printingOutHash(x)
    end
  end

  if inputHash.kind_of?(Hash)
    inputHash.each do |k, v|
      if v.kind_of?(Hash)
        printingOutHash(v)
      else
        ap "#{k}: #{v}"
      end
    end
  end
end

  h = Crack::XML.parse("<Events><Event><System><Provider Name='Service Control Manager' Guid='{555908d1-a6d7-4695-8e1e-26931d2012f4}' EventSourceName='Service Control Manager'/><EventID Qualifiers='16384'>7036</EventID><Version>0</Version><Level>4</Level><Task>0</Task><Opcode>0</Opcode><Keywords>0x8080000000000000</Keywords><TimeCreated SystemTime='2013-03-25T05:00:38.021800000Z'/><EventRecordID>17629</EventRecordID><Correlation/><Execution ProcessID='476' ThreadID='3028'/><Channel>System</Channel><Computer>AMAZONA-ONIST5V</Computer><Security/></System><EventData><Data Name='param1'>Windows Modules Installer</Data><Data Name='param2'>stopped</Data><Binary>540072007500730074006500640049006E007300740061006C006C00650072002F0031000000</Binary></EventData></Event><Event><System><Provider Name='Service Control Manager' Guid='{555908d1-a6d7-4695-8e1e-26931d2012f4}' EventSourceName='Service Control Manager'/><EventID Qualifiers='16384'>7040</EventID><Version>0</Version><Level>4</Level><Task>0</Task><Opcode>0</Opcode><Keywords>0x8080000000000000</Keywords><TimeCreated SystemTime='2013-03-25T05:00:37.741000000Z'/><EventRecordID>17628</EventRecordID><Correlation/><Execution ProcessID='476' ThreadID='3028'/><Channel>System</Channel><Computer>AMAZONA-ONIST5V</Computer><Security UserID='S-1-5-18'/></System><EventData><Data Name='param1'>Windows Modules Installer</Data><Data Name='param2'>auto start</Data><Data Name='param3'>demand start</Data><Data Name='param4'>TrustedInstaller</Data></EventData></Event></Events>")

 printingOutHash(h['Events']['Event'])
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Converting XML to hashes is not a good idea when you're dealing with complex or large data files because walking a hash isn't very convenient in comparison to searching the XML. Parsing XML is really simple using the right tools like Nokogiri.

Basing off your XML:

require 'nokogiri'

xml = "
<Events>
    <Event>
        <System>
            <Provider Name='Service Control Manager' Guid='{555908d1-a6d7-4695-8e1e-26931d2012f4}' EventSourceName='Service Control Manager'/>
            <EventID Qualifiers='16384'>7036</EventID>
            <Version>0</Version>
            <Level>4</Level>
            <Task>0</Task>
            <Opcode>0</Opcode>
            <Keywords>0x8080000000000000</Keywords>
            <TimeCreated SystemTime='2013-03-25T05:00:38.021800000Z'/>
            <EventRecordID>17629</EventRecordID>
            <Correlation/>
            <Execution ProcessID='476' ThreadID='3028'/>
            <Channel>System</Channel>
            <Computer>AMAZONA-ONIST5V</Computer>
            <Security/>
        </System>
        <EventData>
            <Data Name='param1'>Windows Modules Installer</Data>
            <Data Name='param2'>stopped</Data>
            <Binary>540072007500730074006500640049006E007300740061006C006C00650072002F0031000000</Binary>
        </EventData>
    </Event>
    <Event>
        <System>
            <Provider Name='Service Control Manager' Guid='{555908d1-a6d7-4695-8e1e-26931d2012f4}' EventSourceName='Service Control Manager'/>
            <EventID Qualifiers='16384'>7040</EventID>
            <Version>0</Version>
            <Level>4</Level>
            <Task>0</Task>
            <Opcode>0</Opcode>
            <Keywords>0x8080000000000000</Keywords>
            <TimeCreated SystemTime='2013-03-25T05:00:37.741000000Z'/>
            <EventRecordID>17628</EventRecordID>
            <Correlation/>
            <Execution ProcessID='476' ThreadID='3028'/>
            <Channel>System</Channel>
            <Computer>AMAZONA-ONIST5V</Computer>
            <Security UserID='S-1-5-18'/>
        </System>
        <EventData>
            <Data Name='param1'>Windows Modules Installer</Data>
            <Data Name='param2'>auto start</Data>
            <Data Name='param3'>demand start</Data>
            <Data Name='param4'>TrustedInstaller</Data>
        </EventData>
    </Event>
</Events>"

Here's the start of how I'd grab the data:

doc = Nokogiri::XML(xml)
pp doc.search('Event').map { |event|

  system_provider_node = event.at('System Provider')

  system = {
    provider: {
      name: system_provider_node['Name'],
      guid: system_provider_node['Guid'],
      event_source_name: system_provider_node['EventSourceName']
    }
  }

  event_data = event.search('EventData Data').map{ |data|
    {
      name: data['Name'],
      text: data.text
    }
  }

  {
    system: system,
    event_data: event_data
  }    

}

Which results in:

[{:system=>
  {:provider=>
    {:name=>"Service Control Manager",
      :guid=>"{555908d1-a6d7-4695-8e1e-26931d2012f4}",
      :event_source_name=>"Service Control Manager"}},
  :event_data=>
  [{:name=>"param1", :text=>"Windows Modules Installer"},
    {:name=>"param2", :text=>"stopped"}]},
{:system=>
  {:provider=>
    {:name=>"Service Control Manager",
      :guid=>"{555908d1-a6d7-4695-8e1e-26931d2012f4}",
      :event_source_name=>"Service Control Manager"}},
  :event_data=>
  [{:name=>"param1", :text=>"Windows Modules Installer"},
    {:name=>"param2", :text=>"auto start"},
    {:name=>"param3", :text=>"demand start"},
    {:name=>"param4", :text=>"TrustedInstaller"}]}]

You don't have to build an array of hashes. For each <Event> you could peel off the elements and build separate rows in various tables in a database. It's really up to what works in your head.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Nokogiri seems to be a much easier solution that what I already had. I also had the idea of stripping of some indexing values (guid, event name, timestamp), putting them into my database then converting my hash to a string and storing the whole string in the database. That allows me to search the database for the events that I need, and have the full event in the database with nested hashes.. I just convert it back to a hash when I retrieve it. –  Michael Apr 8 '13 at 1:24
    
Yes, extract the fields, and store the ones that have value, but don't bother serializing the hash and storing it, as it's basically a waste of space. It's trivial to search and convert the returned record(s) back into a hash or array of hashes. –  the Tin Man Apr 8 '13 at 1:32

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