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I am guessing that this exists somewhere in R already, so maybe you could point me to it.

I have two numerical vectors, A and B.

A <- c(1,2,3)
B <- c(2,3,4)

I am looking for a function which does something like doing each possible comparison between A and B, and returning a vector of the T/F of those comparisons.

So in this case, it would compare: 1>2 then 1>3 then 1>4 then 2,2 then 2>3 then 2>4 then 3>2 then 3>4 and return:

F,F,F,F,F,F,F,T,F

It would be fine if it returned the differences, as that could be easily converted.

Does a function like this already exist?

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Strictly speaking, this is off topic for CV, but on topic for stackoverflow. If you flag it a moderator will move it there for you. –  Glen_b Mar 25 '13 at 22:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

outer is probably the function you want. However, it returns a matrix, so we need to get a vector. Here's one way of many:

 a <- 1:3
 b <- 2:4
 as.vector(outer(a,b,">"))
[1] FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE

(that's not the order you specified though; it is, however, a consistent order)

Also:

 as.vector(t(outer(a,b,">")))
[1] FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE

Now for differences:

> as.vector(outer(a,b,"-"))
[1] -1  0  1 -2 -1  0 -3 -2 -1

I find that outer is very useful. I use it regularly.

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Worked great. Thank you. –  evt Mar 25 '13 at 22:13
    
I have modified slightly and added some extra information. –  Glen_b Mar 25 '13 at 22:16
    
Instead of using c for its side effect, you will have more readable code if you use as.vector. –  Ananda Mahto Mar 26 '13 at 4:37
    
I debated with myself which would be better (and noted that there were other ways) - while I agree it's more readable, from what I've seen, people tend to use c much more, and I figured that it might be better understood for that reason. I don't see as.vector much by comparison. I'll change it. –  Glen_b Mar 26 '13 at 5:13

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