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I'm looking for a way to manage some research code that is running on a number of supercomputing clusters that require different modules at build time.

For example: Server1 uses intel compilers and the MKL libraries. Server2 uses gcc compilers with blas and lapack libraries.

These differences change a few header files and swap out int for MKL_INT in places (for example), but ultimately the code in general remains the same and should yield the same results (within numerical noise bounds).

This is an active code base and I change bits and pieces regularly. Currently I have the project on github, created a master branch from Server1, then two new branches named Server1 & Server2; modified the code in each branch so they compile and runs as expected and pushed the changes upstream.

Being new to git, I've hit a wall here. Am I able to use this model to now work on the code in general (say on a work branch) and merge these changes to both server branches? If so, would the master branch essentially be rendered useless? Is there a better way to go about working with this situation?

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I would rather suggest using pre-processor macros to modularize your code such that the correct header files, and the datatype names are picked up. A config file or an environment variable can be used with a Makefile and can indicate which kind of environment it is. Although you can do this using git, the workflow would not be really efficient for what you tend to achieve. You would be spending a significant amount of time merging back and forth and resolving conflicts. –  Tuxdude Mar 26 '13 at 2:12
    
That's an extremely good idea that I had not considered. If you expand on it a bit as an answer I'll accept it - thanks. –  Geodesic Mar 26 '13 at 2:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would rather suggest using pre-processor macros to modularize your code such that the correct header files, and the datatype names are picked up.

Although you can do this using git, the workflow would not be really efficient for what you're trying to achieve. You would be spending a significant amount of time merging back and forth and resolving conflicts.

  • Let us assume that you have 2 independent types of configurations (you should be easily able to extend to more than 2 as well). To define options and include headers specific to either of them, you could use the following code structure:

    #if defined(CONFIG_SERVER_1)
    
    /* include any Server1 specific headers */
    /* Define any Server1 specific macros */
    
    #elif defined(CONFIG_SERVER_2)
    
    /* include any Server2 specific headers */
    /* Define any Server2 specific macros */
    
    #else
    
    #error "One of CONFIG_SERVER_1 or CONFIG_SERVER_2 must be defined"
    
    #endif
    
  • You could pass CONFIG_SERVER_1 or CONFIG_SERVER_2 from your Makefile:

    HOST_NAME := $(shell hostname)
    
    ifeq ($(HOST_NAME),Server1)
    CPPFLAGS += -DCONFIG_SERVER_1=1
    else
    ifeq ($(HOST_NAME),Server2)
    CPPFLAGS += -DCONFIG_SERVER_2=1
    else
    $(error Unsupported host)
    endif
    endif
    
  • Try to leverage the compiler macros whenever possible (makes the code portable in the future). For example if you would like to use MKL_INT for ICC, int for GCC and not support any other compilers, you could do this:

    #if defined(__INTEL_COMPILER)
    #define MY_INT MKL_INT
    
    #elif defined(__GNUC__)
    #define MY_INT int
    
    #else
    #error "Unsupported compiler!!!"
    
    #endif
    

    Make sure to use MY_INT everywhere you plan to use int or MLK_INT.

    There are similar macros __PGI for PGCC, __llvm__ for LLVM, etc. Look at this page for more such compiler specific macros. BTW, there are some gotchas here like ICC ends up defining __GNUC__ always to get access to some gcc specific includes. So for the above usage case, make sure you check for all other compilers before checking for gcc.

  • Including such macros in a common header file that can be included by rest of your project would make your life easier when you have more number of source files.

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Perfect! Thanks again. –  Geodesic Mar 26 '13 at 3:04

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