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I've currently got an overridden equals(Object) that looks like this:

@Override
public boolean equals(Object o) {
    if (o == this) return true;
    if (! (o instanceof Player)) return false;
    Player p = (Player) o;
    return getFirstName().equalsIgnoreCase(p.getFirstName()) && 
            getLastName().equalsIgnoreCase(p.getLastName());
}

My hashCode() currently looks like this:

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    int result = 17;
    result = 31 * result + getFirstName().toLowerCase().hashCode();
    result = 31 * result + getLastName().toLowerCase().hashCode();
    return result;
}

My question is regarding my overridden hashCode() method. I know that I need hashCode() to return the same value for two objects if they are considered equal by the equals(Object) method. My gut tells me there is some case where this hashCode() will violate the contract.

Is there an acceptable way to use the equalsIgnoreCase(String) method in an overridden equals(Object) method and generate a hashcode that doesn't violate the contract?

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In hashCode() result = 31... should be result *= 31... so you don't lose the value already in there. –  Patashu Mar 26 '13 at 3:25
1  
He has result in the equation, 31 * result + (otherstuff). So it isn't lost. Just my 2 cents, but I think you're going at it the right way. Your equals method looks good to me. –  Kyle Mar 26 '13 at 3:27
    
Why would your code violate the contract? Your gut must be nervous, don't listen to it ;) –  ddmps Mar 26 '13 at 3:31
1  
I might just be a little on the overly-cautious side, but I'm not entirely sure how the equalsIgnoreCase() and toLowerCase() methods works with special characters and differing locales. I don't think that will apply for this application, but I'm trying to do things as bullet-proof as possible to develop that habit. –  Jazzer Mar 26 '13 at 3:36
    
Conventional wisdom is that you should never rely on the default Locale, but should always use String.toLowerCase(Locale) with an explicit Locale. Otherwise you hit the "infamous Turkish Locale bug". –  Robert Tupelo-Schneck May 8 '13 at 14:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
@Override
public int hashCode() {
    int result = 17;
    result = 31 * result + characterwiseCaseNormalize(getFirstName()).hashCode();
    result = 31 * result + characterwiseCaseNormalize(getLastName()).hashCode();
    return result;
}

private static String characterwiseCaseNormalize(String s) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(s);
    for(int i = 0; i < sb.length(); i++) {
        sb.setCharAt(i,Character.toLowerCase(Character.toUpperCase(sb.charAt(i))));
    }
    return sb.toString();
}

This hashCode will be consistent with an equals defined using equalsIgnoreCase. In principle, according to the contract of equalsIgnoreCase, this seems to rely on it being the case that

Character.toLowerCase(Character.toUpperCase(c1))==Character.toLowerCase(Character.toUpperCase(c2))

whenever

Character.toLowerCase(c1)==Character.toLowerCase(c2).  

I don't have proof that that is true, but the OpenJDK implementation of equalsIgnoreCase actually does it consistently with this method; it checks whether corresponding characters are equals, then whether their upper case versions are equals, then whether the lower case versions of the upper case versions are equal.

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And String.compareToIgnoreCase uses this method explicitly. –  Robert Tupelo-Schneck May 7 '13 at 15:13
    
I'll +1 for a new approach, but you should be really careful. The Javadocs even warn you: In general, String.toLowerCase() should be used to map characters to lowercase. String case mapping methods have several benefits over Character case mapping methods. String case mapping methods can perform locale-sensitive mappings, context-sensitive mappings, and 1:M character mappings, whereas the Character case mapping methods cannot. Plus this behavior doesn't seem guaranteed by the spec, so it may change out from other you. Caution! –  Steven Schlansker May 7 '13 at 18:46
1  
Right... I would say String.equalsIgnoreCase() (and String.compareToIgnoreCase()), being based on the Character case-mapping methods, should come with the same caveat. In terms of writing a hashCode() consistent with equals(), you should either use Character-based case-mapping in both, or String-based case-mapping in both. In fact, the original questioner may really want to keep his hashCode() method and change his equals() method to use s1.toLowerCase().equals(s2.toLowerCase()) instead of equalsIgnoreCase(). –  Robert Tupelo-Schneck May 8 '13 at 14:47

In terms of writing a hashCode() consistent with equals(), you should either use Character-based case-mapping in both, or String-based case-mapping in both. In my other answer I showed how to write a hashCode() using Character-based case-mapping; but there's another solution, which is to change equals() instead to use String-based case-mapping. (Note that String.equalsIgnoreCase() uses Character-based case-mapping.)

@Override
public boolean equals(Object o) {
    if (o == this) return true;
    if (! (o instanceof Player)) return false;
    Player p = (Player) o;
    return getFirstName().toLowerCase().equals(p.getFirstName().toLowerCase()) && 
        getLastName().toLowerCase().equals(p.getLastName().toLowerCase());
}
share|improve this answer
    
In some circumstances, in fact, you really want to use some fancy Unicode normalization on your Strings as well as case-folding. See userguide.icu-project.org/transforms/normalization . –  Robert Tupelo-Schneck May 8 '13 at 14:54

You're right to be worried. Read the contract for equalsIgnoreCase.

Two characters c1 and c2 are considered the same ignoring case if at least one of the following is true:

  • The two characters are the same (as compared by the == operator)
  • Applying the method Character.toUpperCase(char) to each character produces the same result
  • Applying the method Character.toLowerCase(char) to each character produces the same result

So, if there is a character that is equal when converted to upper case but not the other way around, you will be in trouble.

Let's take the example of the German character ß, which turns into a two character sequence SS when converted to upper case. That means that the string "ß" and "SS" are "equalsIgnoreCase" but will not have the same representation when converted to lower case!

So your approach here is broken. Unfortunately, I am not sure that you will be able to design a hashCode that adequately expresses your need here.

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So using the character ß as an example, if we had a player with the first/last name "ßilly ßob", comparing him to another player named "SSilly SSob" would make them be equal in the eyes of equalsIgnoreCase but then generate two different hashCodes (the problem). Assuming this is 'okay' for my application, could we generate a hashCode that is equal when they are considered equal by equalsIgnoreCase by using toUpperCase where I was using toLowerCase? –  Jazzer Mar 26 '13 at 4:59
    
I'm sure you could find a counterexample the other way too. –  Steven Schlansker Mar 27 '13 at 18:40
    
@Jazzer: Does equalsIgnoreCase define an equivalence relation, i.e. is it impossible to have three strings x, y, and z, such that x.equalsIgnoreCase(y) and y.equalsIgnoreCase(z), but not x.equalsIgnoreCase(z)? By the sound of it, "ß".equalsIgnoreCase("SS") would be true, and "ss".equalsIgnoreCase("SS") would be true, but "ß".equalsIgnoreCase("ss") would be false. To override equals with a function that does not implement an equivalence relation would be broken, even if hashCode always returned matching values for matching strings. –  supercat Apr 26 '13 at 21:30
    
"ß".equalsIgnoreCase("SS") is false, because equalsIgnoreCase uses Character.toUpperCase and Character.toLowerCase instead of String.toUpperCase and String.toLowerCase. This gives hope for a hashCode consistent with equalsIgnoreCase; see my answer. –  Robert Tupelo-Schneck May 7 '13 at 14:50

You are right. We can loop through all one-char strings, and find pairs s1,s2 that s1.equalsIgnoreCase(s2) && !s1.toLowerCase().equals(s2.toLowerCase()). There are quite some pairs. For example

s1=0049   'LATIN CAPITAL LETTER I'
s2=0131   'LATIN SMALL LETTER DOTLESS I'

s1.lowercase = 0069   'LATIN SMALL LETTER I'
s2.lowercase = 0131   itself

It also depends on locale: for s1, Turkish and Azerbaijani use U+0131 for lowercase ( see http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/0049/index.htm )

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