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I'm trying to recurse through a directory, processing files and storing the results in a database, but I'm running into a problem.

A simplified example of what I'm trying to do would look like:

{-# LANGUAGE QuasiQuotes, TemplateHaskell, TypeFamilies, OverloadedStrings #-}
{-# LANGUAGE GADTs, FlexibleContexts #-}
import Database.Persist
import Database.Persist.Sqlite
import Database.Persist.TH
import System.Environment (getArgs)
import System.Directory (canonicalizePath, getDirectoryContents, doesDirectoryExist, doesFileExist)
import System.FilePath (combine, takeExtension)
import Control.Monad (filterM, mapM_)
import Control.Monad.IO.Class (liftIO)

share [mkPersist sqlSettings, mkMigrate "migrateAll"] [persistUpperCase|
File                                                       
  path String
  deriving (Show)
|]
main :: IO ()
main = do
  args <- getArgs
  path <- canonicalizePath $ head args
  runSqlite "files.sqlite" $ do
    runMigration migrateAll
    liftIO $ processDirectory path
    return ()

processDirectory path = files >>= mapM_ processFile >>
                        directories >>= mapM_ processDirectory
  where contents  = getDirectoryContents path >>=
                    return . map (combine path) . filter (`notElem` [".", ".."]) 
        directories = contents >>= filterM doesDirectoryExist
        files = contents >>= filterM doesFileExist

processFile path = insert $ File path

The above does not compile however, instead resulting in:

No instance for (PersistStore IO)
      arising from a use of `processFile'
    Possible fix: add an instance declaration for (PersistStore IO)
    In the first argument of `mapM_', namely `processFile'
    In the second argument of `(>>=)', namely `mapM_ processFile'
    In the first argument of `(>>)', namely
      `files >>= mapM_ processFile'
Failed, modules loaded: none.

This makes sense to me, since processFile is just a call to insert, which part of the PersistStore monad (right?) not IO. I think what I need is a monad transformer, but at this point I'm running into a brick wall, which perhaps means I'm barking up the wrong tree.

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

The one thing you do not want enclosed by liftIO is the database action, so you need to rearrange the code to leave processFile outside of it.

About the simplest change to your code which will make it compile is the following. I will leave it to you to tidy it up so that it is clearer what is going on!

{-# LANGUAGE QuasiQuotes, TemplateHaskell, TypeFamilies, OverloadedStrings #-}
{-# LANGUAGE GADTs, FlexibleContexts #-}
import Database.Persist
import Database.Persist.Sqlite
import Database.Persist.TH
import System.Environment (getArgs)
import System.Directory (canonicalizePath, getDirectoryContents, doesDirectoryExist, doesFileExist)
import System.FilePath (combine, takeExtension)
import Control.Monad (filterM, mapM_)
import Control.Monad.IO.Class (liftIO)

share [mkPersist sqlSettings, mkMigrate "migrateAll"] [persistUpperCase|
File                                                       
  path String
  deriving (Show)
|]
main :: IO ()
main = do
  args <- getArgs
  path <- canonicalizePath $ head args
  runSqlite "files.sqlite" $ do
    runMigration migrateAll
    processDirectory path
    return ()

processDirectory path = liftIO files >>= mapM_ processFile >>
                        liftIO directories >>= mapM_ processDirectory
  where contents  = getDirectoryContents path >>=
                    return . map (combine path) . filter (`notElem` [".", ".."])  
        directories = contents >>= filterM doesDirectoryExist
        files = contents >>= filterM doesFileExist

processFile path = insert $ File path
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, yes that should have been obvious once I found liftIO and what it did. I think I had been staring at it too long. Thanks! – Walton Hoops Mar 26 '13 at 13:57

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