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I have a array called str that is made up of a series of comma separated pairs. For example, str[0] is "Bill, John". I am attempting to loop through str and split apart each pair at the comma into arrays called First and Second. I am having difficulty achieving this, if anyone can help I would greatly appreciate it. This is my code I'm working with:

while (a < length)
{
    var Pairs = str[a].Split(',');
    Console.WriteLine(a + ": " + str[a]);
    first[a] = Pairs[0];
    second[a] = Pairs[1];
    a++;
}

The problem I am having is with the first[a] and second[a] lines. I'm having trouble figuring out what data type those variables are supposed to be, it seems like I get a different error for each type I declare them as before the while loop.

Here are the errors I get on the variable implementations within the loop:
If I declare them as arrays: "Cannot apply indexing with [] to an expression of type 'System.Array'"

Array first;
Array second;
while (a < length)
{
    var Pairs = str[a].Split(',');
    Console.WriteLine(a + ": " + str[a]);
    first[a] = Pairs[0];
    second[a] = Pairs[1];
    a++;
}

as ints: "Cannot apply indexing with [] to an expression of type 'int'"

int first;
int second;
while (a < length)
{
    var Pairs = str[a].Split(',');
    Console.WriteLine(a + ": " + str[a]);
    first[a] = Pairs[0];
    second[a] = Pairs[1];
    a++;
}

as strings: "Property or indexer 'string.this[int]' cannot be assigned to -- it is read only"

string first;
string second;
while (a < length)
{
    var Pairs = str[a].Split(',');
    Console.WriteLine(a + ": " + str[a]);
    first[a] = Pairs[0];
    second[a] = Pairs[1];
    a++;
}

as vars: "Implicitly-typed local variables must be initialized" (This error is on the declaration, not within the loop itself. If I initialize it, it is implicitly converting to one of the above data types and throwing the errors associated with them I've mentioned)

var first;
var second;
while (a < length)
{
    var Pairs = str[a].Split(',');
    Console.WriteLine(a + ": " + str[a]);
    first[a] = Pairs[0];
    second[a] = Pairs[1];
    a++;
}
share|improve this question
2  
What's problem with your code? – Cuong Le Mar 26 '13 at 4:26
1  
What is the issue you are having? Are you getting an exception? Is the output not correct? It's hard for use to determine what you want/the issue is from your text. – Alastair Pitts Mar 26 '13 at 4:26
1  
It doesn't look like there is anything wrong with your code. It could be a lot nicer but I would expect that to work. – Daniel Imms Mar 26 '13 at 4:27
    
@Tyriar - except it is not clear where length is set. – Hogan Mar 26 '13 at 4:28
    
@Hogan It's not clear that str is the correct type either :P – Daniel Imms Mar 26 '13 at 4:31
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Based on new edit:

Ok, type Array is never used. It is internal. To use an array you need to use the bracket notation (it seems strange but this comes from C, C++, and Java.)

That looks something like this:

string [10] first;

HOWEVER, in more modern C# you can use generics. They just make more sense in the modern object oriented world. To use them you specify a type they operate on. In many ways they act like you would expect an array to work but with added features. To use them, in your example would, it look like this:

ArrayList<string> first = new ArrayList<string>();
ArrayList<string> second = new ArrayList<string>();

foreach(string a in str)
{
    var Pairs = a.Split(',');
    first.Add(Pairs[0]);
    second.Add(Pairs[1]);
}

The easy way to do this in C# is with the foreach loop.

int index = 0;

foreach(string a in str)
{
    var Pairs = a.Split(',');
    first[index] = Pairs[0];
    second[index] = Pairs[1];
    index++;
}

However, your code could work -- except I don't see where length comes from. Maybe your code should be like this?

int a = 0;
while (a < str.Length)
{
    var Pairs = str[a].Split(',');
    Console.WriteLine(a + ": " + str[a]);
    first[a] = Pairs[0];
    second[a] = Pairs[1];
    a++;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Length is just the length of a text file I have previously calculated. The problem I am having is with the first[a] and second[a] lines. I'm having trouble figuring out what data type those variables are supposed to be, it seems like I get a different error for each type I declare them as before the while loop. – noclist Mar 26 '13 at 11:12
    
@noclist - you have to put problem descriptions in your question -- What errors are you getting, with what input? We can't read your mind. – Hogan Mar 26 '13 at 12:03
    
Thanks for the answer – noclist Apr 27 '13 at 22:41

Try this one

string[] str = new string[1];

        str[0] = "Bill,John";

        string[] first = new string[1];
        string[] second = new string[1];
        string[] pairs = new string[1];

        int a = 0;
        while(a<str.Length)
        {
            pairs = str[a].Split(',');
            first[a] = pairs[0];
            second[a] = pairs[1];
            Console.WriteLine(first[a] + " - " + second[a]);
            a++;
        }

        int i = 0;
        foreach (string item in str)
        {
            pairs = item.Split(',');
            int k = pairs.Count();
            first[i] = pairs[0];
            second[i] = pairs[1];
            Console.WriteLine(first[i] + " - " + second[i]);
            i++;
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Good job coping my answer @yug. You might consider bringing something new to your answer instead of just coping an answer that already existed. – Hogan Mar 26 '13 at 12:05

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