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This is probably impossible, but c++ has surprised me before, so here goes.

I have this base class and three near-identical subclasses:

class MyBaseClass {
};

class MyClassX : public MyBaseClass {
public:
    static MyClassX *create() { return new MyClassX(); }
};

class MyClassY : public MyBaseClass {
public:
    static MyClassY *create() { return new MyClassY(); }
};

class MyClassZ : public MyBaseClass {
public:
    static MyClassZ *create() { return new MyClassZ(); }
};

and I can call them like this:

MyClassY *myObjectY = MyClassY::create();

and I want to shorten that so the base class can do the work, and I don't have to repeat that create() definition for every subclass.

class MyBaseClass {
public:
    template<typename CalledForWhichClass>
    static CalledForWhichClass *create() {
        return new CalledForWhichClass();
    }
};

class MyClassX : public MyBaseClass { };

class MyClassY : public MyBaseClass { };

class MyClassZ : public MyBaseClass { };

however, with this setup, I now have to call it like:

MyClassY myObjectY = MyBaseClass::create<MyClassY>();

but I want to make it so I can still call them like I used to:

MyClassY *myObjectY = MyClassY::create();

I was hoping perhaps there was some black magic like this:

class MyBaseClass {
public:
    template<typename CalledForWhichClass = __static_context__>
    static CalledForWhichClass *create() {
        return new CalledForWhichClass();
    }
};

Any ideas?

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I must admit I don't understand why you're doing things this way. If no initialisation is necessary, why not instantiate the class directly using the new keyword? –  Yaniv Mar 26 '13 at 5:03
    
Encapsulation reasons mostly, I only want the user of this code to see the forward-declared MyClassX, MyClassY, and MyClassZ. If I use new, then I have to let them see the full declaration of the classes. –  Verdagon Mar 26 '13 at 5:18
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about using the CRTP?

template <typename Derived>
struct BasicMyClass : MyBaseClass {
    static Derived *create() { return new Derived(); }
};

struct MyClassX : public BasicMyClass<MyClassX> {};
struct MyClassY : public BasicMyClass<MyClassY> {);
struct MyClassZ : public BasicMyClass<MyClassZ> {);

Instead of trying to make the base class do the work, you use this template to automatically create the create member function for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, I did not think of that! Thanks a bunch! –  Verdagon Mar 26 '13 at 5:18
    
This will work in most cases but there's one small exception for Qt classes - anything that derives from QObject (and is therefore run through moc) cannot use templates. You will get an error: "template classes not supported by Q_OBJECT". –  Nathan Osman Apr 3 '13 at 0:57
    
@GeorgeEdison: This should only be a restriction on the class that derives from QObject, but if you have your class derive from an instance of a class template that itself doesn't derive from QObject, then it should be fine. –  Vaughn Cato Apr 4 '13 at 2:47
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