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On button click I am calling following function.

private void badButtonHandler() {
    Camera.Parameters params = mCamera.getParameters();
    params.setColorEffect(Camera.Parameters.EFFECT_NEGATIVE);
    mCamera.setParameters(params);
    if(thread != null){
        thread = null;
    }
    thread = new Thread()
    {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            try {
                while(true) {
                    sleep(5000);
                    Camera.Parameters params = mCamera.getParameters();
                    params.setColorEffect(Camera.Parameters.EFFECT_NONE);
                    mCamera.setParameters(params);
                }
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    };

    thread.start();
}

This function is intended to change the Color Effect of Camera after 5 seconds of button click. When pressing the related button for the first time it behaves as expected. But additional calls to this function do not behave as expected. I.e., the second time it waits for 2 seconds, after which it decreases to lower values with every click.

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use a flag to control Thread because Thread is running continuously after when u click button first time –  ρяσѕρєя K Mar 26 '13 at 5:08
    
In android I think instead of using Thread its better to use Handler with postDelayed method developer.android.com/reference/android/os/…, long) –  nidhi_adiga Mar 26 '13 at 5:09
    
can I stop after running 1st time?? and run again.. –  Ahmed Nawaz Mar 26 '13 at 5:09
    
If you want to execute only once, why do you need a thread? You can do the same stuff in the listener method. –  Sudhanshu Mar 26 '13 at 5:30
1  
is there a need for while(true) - infinite loop run –  Code2Interface Mar 26 '13 at 5:32
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2 Answers

You should not be relying on sleep() as an accurate timer. It won't automatically wake up at the designated time and become the currently active thread, because of the simple fact that all threads are at the mercy of the thread scheduler. Which undoubtedly will vary from OS to OS based on the given JVM.

I have always relied on custom timer functions for these types of scenarios. So, for example:

myTimer(System.nanoTime());

public static void myTimer(long startTime) {
    while (startTime + 5000000000 > System.nanoTime()) { //Wait for 5 seconds
        try {
            Thread.sleep(50); //Sleep at ~50 millisecond intervals
        }
        catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

You won't need to create an entirely new thread as you have done in your example, since Thread.sleep() will put the current thread to sleep. Also, using a while(true) loop is just poor programming practice.

Using nanoTime() is preferred since it is the most precise system timer available in Java.

See this documentation for additional info on the unreliability of the sleep() function.

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Sleeping can be simplified in Android by using SystemClock.sleep(long), which does not throw InterruptedException –  Justin Muller Mar 26 '13 at 7:14
    
@JustinMuller I would never give up the ability to interrupt a thread unless I had an explicit reason to do so. Especially when I want control over what happens when the end-user presses the sleep-button on their device n seconds before the timer expires. –  b1nary.atr0phy Mar 26 '13 at 7:31
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try this

Thread timer = new Thread(new Runnable() {

        @Override
        public void run() {
            // TODO Auto-generated method stub
            try {
                Thread.sleep(3000);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }finally{
                //Your desired work
            }
        }
    });
    timer.start();
share|improve this answer
    
Adding a finally clause doesn't address the fact that sleep() should NEVER be used as a timer. –  b1nary.atr0phy Mar 26 '13 at 7:03
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