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I have a new question must to be solved! I had created a table as type

TYPE ebRBKTable IS TABLE OF EBTDCCRBK%ROWTYPE INDEX BY PLS_INTEGER;
rbkTable        ebRBKTable;

and then insert some data into table by following statements

rbkTable(InsertTable).BDADDUSERID             := 'FT_RBK_TDCC';

the last i do insert with following statement

FORALL i IN 1..InsertTable - 1
INSERT INTO EBTDCCRBK VALUES rbaTable(i);

I would like to ask whether is there some ways to insert all type once without count(i)

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
what do you mean "insert all type once without count(i)"? You don't have "count(i)" in your sample code. What exactly are you trying to achieve? –  Jeffrey Kemp Mar 26 '13 at 6:59
    
I would like to remove "i" from my insert statement like the following statement "INSERT INTO EBTDCCRBK VALUES rbaTable;" , the current way that database store date one by one, I would like throw a table type in oracle into database's table once and commit once to reduce transaction –  Kun-yao Wang Mar 26 '13 at 7:03
1  
You can't remove the (i), it's needed by the FORALL statement. FORALL sends all the data in one step, and you only COMMIT once after it already. –  Jeffrey Kemp Mar 26 '13 at 7:10
    
Remember, FORALL is NOT a FOR loop! :) –  Jeffrey Kemp Mar 26 '13 at 7:11
    
This is not a real question. It doesn't state whether your job is done using the existing code neither what you wish to achieve is rational. –  Rachcha Mar 26 '13 at 7:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

a forall statement is not a loop as such.

What it does is send ALL elements of the array to the SQL engine in one go, which enables the SQL to insert the rows without having to go back to the PL/SQL engine to get more data.

In other words FORALL removes the context switching that you would have in a regular FOR loop.

We can show this with a simple trace. Consider:

SQL> alter session set sql_trace=true;

Session altered.

SQL> declare
  2    TYPE ebRBKTable IS TABLE OF EBTDCCRBK%ROWTYPE INDEX BY PLS_INTEGER;
  3    rbkTable        ebRBKTable;
  4  begin
  5
  6    for idx in 1..100000
  7    loop
  8      rbkTable(idx).BDADDUSERID := dbms_random.string('a', 10);
  9    end loop;
 10
 11    forall idx in 1..rbkTable.count
 12    insert into EBTDCCRBK values rbkTable(idx);
 13    commit;
 14
 15  end;
 16  /

in the SQL trace we see:

INSERT INTO EBTDCCRBK
VALUES
 (:B1 )


call     count       cpu    elapsed       disk      query    current        rows
------- ------  -------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------  ----------
Parse        1      0.00       0.00          0          0          0           0
Execute      1      0.07       0.07          1        724       3066      100000
Fetch        0      0.00       0.00          0          0          0           0
------- ------  -------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------  ----------
total        2      0.07       0.07          1        724       3066      100000

vs a regluar loop:

SQL> alter session set sql_trace=true;

Session altered.

SQL> declare
  2    TYPE ebRBKTable IS TABLE OF EBTDCCRBK%ROWTYPE INDEX BY PLS_INTEGER;
  3    rbkTable        ebRBKTable;
  4  begin
  5
  6    for idx in 1..100000
  7    loop
  8      rbkTable(idx).BDADDUSERID := dbms_random.string('a', 10);
  9    end loop;
 10
 11    for idx in 1..rbkTable.count
 12    loop
 13      insert into EBTDCCRBK values rbkTable(idx);
 14    end loop;
 15    commit;
 16
 17  end;
 18  /

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

SQL> alter session set sql_trace=false;

and the trace file shows:

INSERT INTO EBTDCCRBK
VALUES
 (:B1 )


call     count       cpu    elapsed       disk      query    current        rows
------- ------  -------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------  ----------
Parse        1      0.00       0.00          0          0          0           0
Execute 100000      3.33       3.24          1        689     104216      100000
Fetch        0      0.00       0.00          0          0          0           0
------- ------  -------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------  ----------
total   100001      3.33       3.24          1        689     104216      100000

notice the trace file in the FORALL version only had ONE execute, i.e. the SQL engine did the work in one hit. In the FOR LOOP variant, the SQL engine had 100k executes, and used a lot more CPU to do the same job (as it had to do a lot of single operations and the session was context switching from pl/sql->sql for each inserted row.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for detail explanation –  Kun-yao Wang Mar 28 '13 at 1:42
    
may I ask what are those number's unit? is it millisecond or second? –  Kun-yao Wang Mar 28 '13 at 1:53
    
@Kun-yaoWang the times (cpu/elapsed) are seconds. –  DazzaL Mar 28 '13 at 8:04
    
Thank you so much! –  Kun-yao Wang Mar 28 '13 at 8:41

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