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From the Binding object

Objects of class Binding encapsulate the execution context at some particular place in the code and retain this context for future use. The variables, methods, value of self, and possibly an iterator block that can be accessed in this context are all retained. Binding objects can be created using Kernel#binding, and are made available to the callback of Kernel#set_trace_func.

can anyone help me to understand the fact by single examples of each the bold lines above?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Methods:

x = eval("foo", binding) rescue "foo undefined"
puts x

def foo; "foo"; end

puts eval("foo", binding)

This outputs:

foo undefined
foo

Value of self:

puts eval("self", binding)
class Foo
  def eval_self
    eval("self", binding)
  end
end
puts Foo.new.eval_self

This outputs:

main
#<Foo:0x10c5a3018>

An iterator block:

block = eval("yield", binding) rescue "no iterator block"
puts block

def block
  eval("yield", binding)
end
puts block { "iterator block" }

This outputs:

no iterator block
iterator block

Kernel#set_trace_func:

class Test
  def test
    a = 1
  end
end

set_trace_func proc { |event, file, line, id, binding, classname|
  puts eval("self", binding)
}
t = Test.new
t.test

This outputs:

main
Test
#<Test:0x10204cb28>
#<Test:0x10204cb28>
Test
main
#<Test:0x10204cb28>
#<Test:0x10204cb28>
#<Test:0x10204cb28>
main
main
main

You can read more about Kernel#set_trace_func in its documentation.

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Exactly the one I was searching for. and please explain this also with some tiny examples Kernel#set_trace_func.. –  Arup Rakshit Mar 26 '13 at 6:56

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