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Have a look at the following SVG file:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<!DOCTYPE svg PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD SVG 1.1//EN" "http://www.w3.org/Graphics/SVG/1.1/DTD/svg11.dtd">
<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" width="400" height="400">
<polygon points="10,10 10,390 390,390 10,10" style="fill:rgb(140,90,90)" />
<polygon points="10,10 390,390 390,10 10,10" style="fill:rgb(90,140,90)" />
</svg>

If you try this, the two triangles have a thin gray area, which separates them. I want to get rid of these, since I have hundreds of small triangles, and then the separating lines are visible as a grid on the area, which should be covered by the triangles. I noticed, that the SVG export of Mathematica has exactly this problem.

I tried to fill the outline with a stroke of the same color and width 1. But then, the triangles overfill. Consequently, the look depends on the order, in which the triangles are painted.

Is there any clean solution or at least an improvement to this problem?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is an outcome of the rasterization strategy used, and there is no easy fix.

One fix is to stroke the triangles, but with a very, very thin stroke. For example, here's one with a 0.2px stroke:

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/Qw2HL/

Alternatively, you can double-up your graphics and render the stroked versions underneath the actual content.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/Qw2HL/1/

<g id="underlay">
  <polygon class="t1" points="10,10 10,390 390,390 10,10" />
  <polygon class="t2" points="10,10 390,390 390,10 10,10" />
</g><g id="content">
  <polygon class="t1" points="10,10 10,390 390,390 10,10" />
  <polygon class="t2" points="10,10 390,390 390,10 10,10" />
</g>
.t1 { fill:rgb(140,90,90); stroke:rgb(140,90,90) }
.t2 { fill:rgb(90,140,90); stroke:rgb(90,140,90) }
#underlay polygon { stroke-width:1px }
#content  polygon { stroke:none      }

(You can do this automatically via JS if you are running in a user agent like a web-browser where it is available.)


This demo shows the problem quite clearly.

The Problem: http://jsfiddle.net/tbCxT/

<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg">
  <g id="aligned">
    <polygon class="a" points="10,10 10,100 100,100, 100,10" />
    <polygon class="b" points="100,10 100,100 200,100, 200,10" />
  </g>
  <g id="shifted" transform="translate(0.5,110)">
    <polygon class="a" points="10,10 10,100 100,100, 100,10" />
    <polygon class="b" points="100,10 100,100 200,100, 200,10" />
  </g>
</svg>

Here we have two vertical edges exactly on top of each other. In the first case, they are exactly aligned on the pixel grid. The left shape fills all pixels to the left exactly, the right shape fills all pixels to the right exactly, and neither fill across the gap.

In the second case, however, both shapes land right between the pixel boundary. Since our shape overlaps these pixels by 50%, anti-aliasing tells us in this case that we should fill the pixels that we overlap exactly 50% opacity. So the left shape fills this shared column of pixels with 50% opaque, and then the right shape fills the shared column with pixels that are an additional 50% opacity.

Unfortunately, opacity builds through multiplication, not addition. A pixel of rgba(0,0,0,0.5) overtop of rgba(0,0,0,0.5) produces rgba(0,0,0,0.75), NOT rgba(0,0,0,1).

This is the crux of the problem, and it's not specific to SVG. For example, see:

When you are sampling an infinitely-precise vector image to a finite pixel grid, information is lost. You need to hack to work around it.

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Thanks. I have already though of the thin stroke method and am using it in my project to export SVG for now (search for "Euler Math Toolbox"). But for too thin strokes the background shines through. I need it for 3D graphics with sorted triangles, by the way. My feeling is that this should not happen at all. Anti-Aliased pixels between the triangles should mix and fill the gap completely. –  Rene Mar 27 '13 at 10:28
    
@Rene Please see my edit. I understand the desire and feeling that "this should not happen". However, it does, and for completely valid reasons. –  Phrogz Mar 27 '13 at 13:23
    
I thought about your comment. Opacity works like this, you are right. Thus anti-aliasing cannot be handled with transparency in full perfection. –  Rene Mar 28 '13 at 15:38
    
I'm glad that you agree. Does this answer thus answer your question? –  Phrogz Mar 28 '13 at 16:47

what you see appears to be an artifact of mapping vector graphics to bitmap devices. to compensate for it, slightliy perturb one of the triangles involved by an amount of less than 1 unit.

example (code see below): translate the purple polygon by shifting it 0.2 units along the x axis.

note that the quality of the result - aside from obvious factors - will depend on the zoom factor. in the given example, i can see the separating line disappear at a zoom level of >=150% in chrome 25.

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<!DOCTYPE svg PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD SVG 1.1//EN" "http://www.w3.org/Graphics/SVG/1.1/DTD/svg11.dtd">
<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" width="400" height="400">
<polygon points="10.2,10   10.2,390 390.2,390 10.2,10" style="fill:rgb(140,90,90)" />
<polygon points="  10,10    390,390   390,10    10,10" style="fill:rgb(90,140,90)" />
</svg>

another option might be to change some of the triangles to pentagons, an adjoined trapezoidal area covering the separating line between triangles (see code below) which works for zoom factors > 67%. are there any constraints on the triangles and their orientation in the plane (like one right angle, sides on an orthogonal lattice) ?

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<!DOCTYPE svg PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD SVG 1.1//EN" "http://www.w3.org/Graphics/SVG/1.1/DTD/svg11.dtd">
<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" width="400" height="400">
<polygon points="10,10  10,390  390,390 390,389.6 10.4,10 10,10" style="fill:rgb(140,90,90)" />
<polygon points="10,10      390,390 390,10  10,10"               style="fill:rgb(90,140,90)" />
</svg>
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I had the same problem with space between polygons sharing an edge. Here are two triangles sharing one edge, with various opacity:

http://jsfiddle.net/YfH9N/embedded/result/

...the space is more visible when polygons have higher opacity. As was suggested in other answers, adding a stroked outline to your polygons helps, but the correct width of the stroke depends on the polygon's opacity.

Using constant 1px stroke width:

http://jsfiddle.net/LKQHf/embedded/result/

Using stroke width = polygon_alpha ^ 6:

http://jsfiddle.net/ekwk3/2/embedded/result/

...I found the equation for stroke width only empirically using this Perl script, so you can try it yourself:

#!/usr/bin/perl

print "<?xml version=\"1.0\" standalone=\"no\"?>
<!DOCTYPE svg PUBLIC \"-//W3C//DTD SVG 1.1//EN\" \"http://www.w3.org/Graphics/SVG/1.1/DTD/svg11.dtd\">
<svg version=\"1.1\" xmlns=\"http://www.w3.org/2000/svg\" width=\"1100\" height=\"100\">
";

for (my $alpha = 0; $alpha<=1; $alpha+=0.025) {
    my $alpha_str = sprintf("%.3f", $alpha);
    my $alpha_stroke = 1;#$alpha ** 6;
    my $alpha_stroke_str = sprintf("%.3f", $alpha_stroke);
    my $stroke_width = $alpha ** 6;
    my $stroke_width_str = sprintf("%.3fpx", $stroke_width);

    print "
    <g transform=\"translate(".($alpha*1000).",0)\">    
        <polygon points=\"20,10 25,49 6,40\" style=\"fill:rgb(255,100,0);fill-opacity:$alpha_str;stroke:rgb(255,100,0);stroke-width:$stroke_width_str;stroke-opacity:$alpha_stroke_str\" />
        <polygon points=\"20,10 25,49 40,4\" style=\"fill:rgb(255,100,0);fill-opacity:$alpha_str;stroke:rgb(255,100,0);stroke-width:$stroke_width_str;stroke-opacity:$alpha_stroke_str\" />
    </g>\n";
}

print "</svg>";
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