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I want to put some large applications into my startup script. Since launching each one is I/O-heavy task, to avoid congestion, I'd like to postpone launching another one until the first one initializes.

These are not working scripts that make some job and then exist. I'm talking about GUI applications (like Firefox, Eclipse), that will not exit, so the only way of knowing the application has done its initialization chores is (correct me if I'm wrong) examining disk I/O.

I know that I can glue something up with parsing output from atop or even better with vmstat - but something tells me, that there must be an easier solution, like "wait-for-io-idle" utility that returns when disk IO sampled over given time (e.g. 3 seconds) is less than given threshold (e.g. 10%).

Does anyone knows about such utility?

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is not the ideal one you are looking for, but a solution still:

while [[ $(iostat -d -x 3 2 sda | 
          sed -n 's/.*[^0-9]\([0-9][0-9]*\),[^,]*$/\1/p' | tail -1) > 10 
      ]]; do 
  echo wait
done

samples the utilization of sda for 3 seconds and exits if less then 10%.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. It doesn't work, unfortunately. There must be a incompatibility between mine and your version of iostat. I'm debugging it right now. BTW I use Ubuntu 12.10. – Adam Ryczkowski Mar 26 '13 at 8:09
    
For one, on my system there is locale, that uses comma for a decimal point. But there is more, because it still doesn't work. (This is the problem with parsing output of command line utilities - it is never portable) – Adam Ryczkowski Mar 26 '13 at 8:14
    
I'm using fedora. When I do iostat it is the last column so thought it can be somewhat easy to get it. What is your iostat output? – perreal Mar 26 '13 at 8:28
    
paste.ubuntu.com/5648828 – Adam Ryczkowski Mar 26 '13 at 8:40
    
thanks, updated the sed expression, there was an error in it also – perreal Mar 26 '13 at 8:48

Based on pereal's answer I've patched a script, that is ready to use. Let's call it wait-for-disk-idle. The drawback of this method is that it needs initialization time on its own. It takes twice "sample time" to execute while effectively sampling "sample time". This is the limitation of iostat.

(Yes, it must be bash, not sh)

#! /bin/bash

USAGE="Usage: `basename $0` [-t sample time] [-p disk IO percent threshold] disk-device"

time=3
percent=10
# Parse command line options.
while getopts ":t:" OPT; do
    case "$OPT" in
        t)
            time=$OPTARG
            ;;
        :)
            # getopts issues an error message
            echo "`basename $0` version 0.1"
            echo $USAGE >&2
            exit 1
            ;;
        \?)
            # getopts issues an error message
            echo "`basename $0` version 0.1"
            echo $USAGE >&2
            exit 1
            ;;
    esac
done
while getopts ":p:" OPT; do
    case "$OPT" in
        p)
            percent=$OPTARG
            ;;
        :)
            ;;
        \?)
            # getopts issues an error message
            echo "`basename $0` version 0.1"
            echo $USAGE >&2
            exit 1
            ;;
    esac
done

# Remove the switches we parsed above.
shift `expr $OPTIND - 1`

# We want at least one non-option argument. 
# Remove this block if you don't need it.
if [ $# -eq 0 ]; then
    # getopts issues an error message
    echo "`basename $0` version 0.1"
    echo $USAGE >&2
    exit 1
fi

# echo percent: $percent, time: $time, disk: $1

while [[ $(iostat -d -x $time 2 $1 | 
          sed -n 's/.*[^0-9]\([0-9][0-9]*\),[^,]*$/\1/p' | tail -1) > $percent 
      ]]; do 
#   echo wait
done
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