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Occasionally I have a need to retry an operation several times before giving up. My code is like:

int retries = 3;
while(true) {
  try {
    DoSomething();
    break; // success!
  } catch {
    if(--retries == 0) throw;
    else Thread.Sleep(1000);
  }
}

I would like to rewrite this in a general retry function like:

TryThreeTimes(DoSomething);

Is it possible in C#? What would be the code for the TryThreeTimes() method?

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A simple cycle is not enough? Why just not to iterate over and execute logic for several times? –  Restuta Oct 13 '09 at 22:08
6  
Personally, I would be extremely wary of any such helper method. It's certainly possible to implement using lambdas, but the pattern itself is extremely smelly, so introducing a helper for it (which implies that it is frequently repeated) is in and of itself highly suspicious, and strongly hints at bad overall design. –  Pavel Minaev Oct 13 '09 at 22:53
4  
In my case, my DoSomething()s are doing stuff on remote machines such as deleting files, or trying to hit a network port. In both cases, there are major timing issues for when DoSomething will succeed and because of the remoteness, there is no event I can listen on. So yeah, its smelly. Suggestions welcome. –  RichAmberale Oct 13 '09 at 22:58
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16 Answers

up vote 173 down vote accepted

Blanket catch statements that simply retry the same call can be dangerous if used as a general exception handling mechanism. Having said that, here's a lambda-based retry wrapper that you can use with any method. I chose to factor the number of retries and the retry timeout out as parameters for a bit more flexibility:

public static class Retry
{
   public static void Do(
       Action action,
       TimeSpan retryInterval,
       int retryCount = 3)
   {
       Do<object>(() => 
       {
           action();
           return null;
       }, retryInterval, retryCount);
   }

   public static T Do<T>(
       Func<T> action, 
       TimeSpan retryInterval,
       int retryCount = 3)
   {
       var exceptions = new List<Exception>();

       for (int retry = 0; retry < retryCount; retry++)
       {
          try
          { 
              return action();
          }
          catch (Exception ex)
          { 
              exceptions.Add(ex);
              Thread.Sleep(retryInterval);
          }
       }

       throw new AggregateException(exceptions);
   }
}

You can now use this utility method to perform retry logic:

Retry.Do(() => SomeFunctionThatCanFail(), TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));

or:

Retry.Do(SomeFunctionThatCanFail, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));

or:

int result = Retry.Do(SomeFunctionWhichReturnsInt, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1), 4);

Or you could even make an async overload.

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9  
Sorry to "if(numRetries <= 0) throw;". oops :) –  csharptest.net Oct 13 '09 at 22:48
5  
+1, especially for the warning and error-checking. I'd be more comfortable if this passed in the type of the exception to catch as a generic parameter (where T: Exception), though. –  TrueWill Oct 13 '09 at 22:55
1  
@Eduardo: Moving the if out of the do loop would result in the catch statement sleeping even when the retry count is zero. Not something that I think is generally desirable. Do you have a way to avoid that without the conditional check inside the loop? –  LBushkin Oct 14 '09 at 0:21
4  
We use a similar pattern for our DB access in a high volume Biztalk App, but with two improvements: We have blacklists for exceptions that shouldn't be retried and we store the first exception that occurs and throw that when the retry ultimately fails. Reason being that the second and following exceptions often are different from the first one. In that case you hide the initial problem when rethrowing only the last exception. –  TToni Mar 22 '12 at 11:21
1  
@Dexters We throw a new exception with the original exception as inner exception. The original stack trace is available as attribute from the inner exceptions. –  TToni Mar 31 '13 at 21:31
show 16 more comments

This is possibly a bad idea. First, it is emblematic of the maxim "the definition of insanity is doing the same thing twice and expecting different results each time". Second, this coding pattern does not compose well with itself. For example:

Suppose your network hardware layer resends a packet three times on failure, waiting, say, a second between failures.

Now suppose the software layer resends an notification about a failure three times on packet failure.

Now suppose the notification layer reactivates the notification three times on an notification delivery failure.

Now suppose the error reporting layer reactivates the notification layer three times on a notification failure.

And now suppose the web server reactivates the error reporting three times on error failure.

And now suppose the web client resends the request three times upon getting an error from the server.

Now suppose the line on the network switch that is supposed to route the notification to the administrator is unplugged. When does the user of the web client finally get their error message? I make it at about twelve minutes later.

Lest you think this is just a silly example: we have seen this bug in customer code, though far, far worse than I've described here. In the particular customer code, the gap between the error condition happening and it finally being reported to the user was several weeks because so many layers were automatically retrying with waits. Just imagine what would happen if there were ten retries instead of three.

Usually the right thing to do with an error condition is report it immediately and let the user decide what to do. If the user wants to create a policy of automatic retries, let them create that policy at the appropriate level in the software abstraction.

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12  
+1. Raymond shares a real life example here, blogs.msdn.com/oldnewthing/archive/2005/11/07/489807.aspx –  SolutionYogi Oct 14 '09 at 13:57
86  
-1 This advice is useless for transient network failures encountered by automated batch processing systems. –  nohat Sep 24 '10 at 21:22
8  
Not sure if this is saying "Don't do it" followed by "do it". Most of the people asking this question are probably the people working in the software abstraction. –  Jim Leonardo Apr 12 '12 at 16:30
11  
When you have long running batch jobs that use network resources, such as web services, you can't expect the network to be 100% reliable. There are going to be occasional timeouts, socket disconnects, possibly even spurious routing glitches or server outages that occur while you are using it. One option is to fail, but that may mean restarting a lengthy job later. Another option is to retry a few times with suitable delay to see if it's a temporary problem, then fail. I agree about composition, which you have to be aware of.. but it's sometimes the best choice. –  Erik Funkenbusch Feb 4 '13 at 22:13
1  
As @Mystere Man says, there is situations where it doesn't necessarily serve the user to get hit by a retry dialog instantly. But if you must, the scenario here is grim, so don't ever use "Retry X number of times"... if you must retry automatically, then use "Retry every X for Y time", e.g. "Retry every 100 ms for 500 ms"... Then you can ensure that it won't grow in time for each layer, because the top layers would never retry as the maximum time would be exceeded by the lower layer retries. –  Jens Apr 22 '13 at 11:14
show 4 more comments

The Transient Fault Handling Application Block provides an extensible collection of retry strategies including:

  • Incremental
  • Fixed interval
  • Exponential back-off

It also includes a collection of error detection strategies for cloud-based services.

For more information see this chapter of the Developer's Guide.

Available via NuGet (search for 'topaz').

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1  
Interesting. Can you use this outside of Windows Azure, say in a Winforms app? –  Matthew Lock Jan 22 '13 at 5:18
5  
Absolutely. Use the core retry mechanism and provide your own detection strategies. We intentionally decoupled those. Find the core nuget package here: nuget.org/packages/TransientFaultHandling.Core –  Grigori Melnik Jan 22 '13 at 15:13
    
Updated doc can be found here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn440719(v=pandp.60).aspx –  Grigori Melnik Dec 3 '13 at 0:49
    
Also, the project is now under Apache 2.0 and accepting community contributions. aka.ms/entlibopen –  Grigori Melnik Dec 3 '13 at 0:50
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Allowing for functions and retry messages

public static T RetryMethod<T>(Func<T> method, int numRetries, int retryTimeout, Action onFailureAction)
{
 Guard.IsNotNull(method, "method");            
 T retval = default(T);
 do
 {
   try
   {
     retval = method();
     return retval;
   }
   catch
   {
     onFailureAction();
      if (numRetries <= 0) throw; // improved to avoid silent failure
      Thread.Sleep(retryTimeout);
   }
} while (numRetries-- > 0);
  return retval;
}
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You should try Polly. Its a .NET library written by me that allows developers to express transient exception handling policies such as Retry, Retry Forever, Wait and Retry or Circuit Breaker in a fluent manner.

https://github.com/michael-wolfenden/Polly

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public void TryThreeTimes(Action action)
{
    int retries = 3;
    while(true) {
      try {
        action();
        break; // success!
      } catch {
        if(--retries == 0) throw;
        else Thread.Sleep(1000);
      }
   }
}

Then you would call:

TryThreeTimes(DoSomething);

...or alternatively...

TryThreeTimes(() => DoSomethingElse(withLocalVariable));

A more flexible option:

public void DoWithRetry(Action action, TimeSpan sleepPeriod, int retryCount = 3)
{
    while(true) {
      try {
        action();
        break; // success!
      } catch {
        if(--retryCount == 0) throw;
        else Thread.Sleep(sleepPeriod);
      }
   }
}

To be used as:

DoWithRetry(DoSomething, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2), retryCount: 10);
share|improve this answer
    
In your code DoSomething should be action –  ChrisF Oct 13 '09 at 22:11
    
@ChrisF -- cheers –  Drew Noakes Oct 13 '09 at 22:12
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You might also consider adding the exception type you want to retry for. For instance is this a timeout exception you what to retry? A database exception?

RetryForExcpetionType(DoSomething, typeof(TimeoutException), 5, 1000);

public static void RetryForExcpetionType(Action action, Type retryOnExceptionType, int numRetries, int retryTimeout)
{
    if (action == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("action");
    if (retryOnExceptionType == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("retryOnExceptionType");
    while (true)
    {
        try
        {
            action();
            return;
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            if (--numRetries <= 0 || !retryOnExceptionType.IsAssignableFrom(e.GetType()))
                throw;

            if (retryTimeout > 0)
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(retryTimeout);
        }
    }
}

You might also note that all of the other examples have a similar issue with testing for retries == 0 and either retry infinity or fail to raise exceptions when given a negative value. Also Sleep(-1000) will fail in the catch blocks above. Depends on how 'silly' you expect people to be but defensive programming never hurts.

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6  
+1, but why not do RetryForException<T>(...) where T: Exception, then catch(T e)? Just tried it and it works perfectly. –  TrueWill Oct 14 '09 at 1:23
    
Either or here since I don't need to do anything with the Type provided I figured a plain old parameter would do the trick. –  csharptest.net Oct 14 '09 at 1:49
    
@TrueWill apparently catch(T ex) has some bugs according to this post stackoverflow.com/questions/1577760/… –  csharptest.net Oct 16 '09 at 14:15
2  
Update: Actually a better implementation I've been using takes a Predicate<Exception> delegate that returns true if a retry is appropriate. This allows you to use native error codes or other properties of the exception to determine if a retry is applicable. For instance HTTP 503 codes. –  csharptest.net Apr 16 '12 at 18:44
    
@csharptest.net: the SO link you posted actually concludes that the bug is only evident under the VS debugger (with .NET 3.5). I've tested catch (T ex) and it works perfectly in VS 2010 both under the debugger and otherwise –  mishrsud Feb 20 '13 at 6:29
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I'd implement this:

public static bool Retry(int maxRetries, Func<bool, bool> method)
{
    while (maxRetries > 0)
    {
        if (method(maxRetries == 1))
        {
            return true;
        }
        maxRetries--;
    }
    return false;        
}

I wouldn't use exceptions the way they're used in the other examples. It seems to me that if we're expecting the possibility that a method won't succeed, its failure isn't an exception. So the method I'm calling should return true if it succeeded, and false if it failed.

Why is it a Func<bool, bool> and not just a Func<bool>? So that if I want a method to be able to throw an exception on failure, I have a way of informing it that this is the last try.

So I might use it with code like:

Retry(5, delegate(bool lastIteration)
   {
       // do stuff
       if (!succeeded && lastIteration)
       {
          throw new InvalidOperationException(...)
       }
       return succeeded;
   });

or

if (!Retry(5, delegate(bool lastIteration)
   {
       // do stuff
       return succeeded;
   }))
{
   Console.WriteLine("Well, that didn't work.");
}

If passing a parameter that the method doesn't use proves to be awkward, it's trivial to implement an overload of Retry that just takes a Func<bool> as well.

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1  
+1 for avoiding the exception. Though I'd do a void Retry(...) and throw something? Boolean returns and/or return codes are too often overlooked. –  csharptest.net Oct 13 '09 at 23:22
1  
"if we're expecting the possibility that a method won't succeed, its failure isn't an exception" - while that's true in some cases, exception need not imply exceptional. It's for error handling. There is no guarantee that the caller will check a Boolean result. There is a guarantee that an exception will be handled (by the runtime shutting down the application if nothing else does). –  TrueWill Oct 14 '09 at 1:17
    
I can't find the reference but I believe .NET defines an Exception as "a method didn't do what it said it will do". 1 purpose is to use exceptions to indicate a problem rather than the Win32 pattern of requiring the caller to check the return value if the function succeeded or not. –  RichAmberale Oct 14 '09 at 4:03
    
But exceptions don't merely "indicate a problem." They also include a mass of diagnostic information that costs time and memory to compile. There are clearly situations in which that doesn't matter the least little bit. But there are a lot where it does. .NET doesn't use exceptions for control flow (compare, say, with Python's use of the StopIteration exception), and there's a reason. –  Robert Rossney Oct 14 '09 at 8:56
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Building on the previous work, I thought about enhancing the retry logic in three ways:

  1. Specifying what exception type to catch/retry. This is the primary enhacement as retrying for any exception is just plain wrong.
  2. Not nesting the last try in a try/catch, achieving slightly better performance
  3. Making it an Action extension method

    static class ActionExtensions
    {
      public static void InvokeAndRetryOnException<T> (this Action action, int retries, TimeSpan retryTimeout) where T : Exception
      {
        if (action == null)
          throw new ArgumentNullException("action");
    
        while( retries-- > 0 )
        {
          try
          {
            action( );
            return;
          }
          catch (T)
          {
            Thread.Sleep( retryTimeout );
          }
        }
    
        action( );
      }
    }
    

The method can then be invoked like so (anonymous methods can be used as well, of course):

new Action( AMethodThatMightThrowIntermittentException )
  .InvokeAndRetryOnException<IntermittentException>( 2, TimeSpan.FromSeconds( 1 ) );
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I'm a fan of recursion and extension methods, so here are my two cents:

public static void InvokeWithRetries(this Action @this, ushort numberOfRetries)
{
    try
    {
        @this();
    }
    catch
    {
        if (numberOfRetries == 0)
            throw;

        InvokeWithRetries(@this, --numberOfRetries);
    }
}
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I needed a method that supported cancellation, while I was at it, I added support for returning intermediate failures.

public static class ThreadUtils
{
    public static RetryResult Retry(
        Action target,
        CancellationToken cancellationToken,
        int timeout = 5000,
        int retries = 0)
    {
        CheckRetryParameters(timeout, retries)
        var failures = new List<Exception>();
        while(!cancellationToken.IsCancellationRequested)
        {
            try
            {
                target();
                return new RetryResult(failures);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                failures.Add(ex);
            }

            if (retries > 0)
            {
                retries--;
                if (retries == 0)
                {
                    throw new AggregateException(
                     "Retry limit reached, see InnerExceptions for details.",
                     failures);
                }
            }

            if (cancellationToken.WaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout))
            {
                break;
            }
        }

        failures.Add(new OperationCancelledException(
            "The Retry Operation was cancelled."));
        throw new AggregateException("Retry was cancelled.", failures);
    }

    private static void CheckRetryParameters(int timeout, int retries)
    {
        if (timeout < 1)
        {
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(...
        }

        if (retries < 0)
        {
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(...

        }
    }

    public class RetryResult : IEnumerable<Exception>
    {
        private readonly IEnumerable<Exception> failureExceptions;
        private readonly int failureCount;

         protected internal RetryResult(
             ICollection<Exception> failureExceptions)
         {
             this.failureExceptions = failureExceptions;
             this.failureCount = failureExceptions.Count;
         }
    }

    public int FailureCount
    {
        get { returm this.failureCount; }
    }

    public IEnumerator<Exception> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.failureExceptions.GetEnumerator();
    }

    System.Collections.IEnumerator 
        System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.GetEnumerator();
    }
}

You can use the Retry function like this, retry 3 times with a 10 second delay but without cancellation.

try
{
    var result = ThreadUtils.Retry(
        SomeAction, 
        CancellationToken.None,
        10000,
        3);

    // it worked
    result.FailureCount // but failed this many times first.
}
catch (AggregationException ex)
{
   // oops, 3 retries wasn't enough.
}

or, retry eternally every five seconds, unless cancelled.

try
{
    var result = ThreadUtils.Retry(
        SomeAction, 
        someTokenSource.Token);

    // it worked
    result.FailureCount // but failed this many times first.
}
catch (AggregationException ex)
{
   // operation was cancelled before success.
}

As you guess, In my source code I've overloaded the Retry function to support the differing delgate types I desire to use.

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public delegate void ThingToTryDeletage();

public static void TryNTimes(ThingToTryDelegate, int N, int sleepTime)
{
   while(true)
   {
      try
      {
        ThingToTryDelegate();
      } catch {

            if( --N == 0) throw;
          else Thread.Sleep(time);          
      }
}
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3  
I see four bugs here :-) –  Vinko Vrsalovic Oct 13 '09 at 22:09
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I had the need to pass some parameter to my method to retry, and have a result value; so i need an expression.. I build up this class that does the work (it is inspired to the the LBushkin's one) you can use it like this:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    // one shot
    var res = Retry<string>.Do(() => retryThis("try"), 4, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2), fix);

    // delayed execute
    var retry = new Retry<string>(() => retryThis("try"), 4, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2), fix);
    var res2 = retry.Execute();
}

static void fix()
{
    Console.WriteLine("oh, no! Fix and retry!!!");
}

static string retryThis(string tryThis)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Let's try!!!");
    throw new Exception(tryThis);
}

public class Retry<TResult>
{
    Expression<Func<TResult>> _Method;
    int _NumRetries;
    TimeSpan _RetryTimeout;
    Action _OnFailureAction;

    public Retry(Expression<Func<TResult>> method, int numRetries, TimeSpan retryTimeout, Action onFailureAction)
    {
        _Method = method;
        _NumRetries = numRetries;
        _OnFailureAction = onFailureAction;
        _RetryTimeout = retryTimeout;
    }

    public TResult Execute()
    {
        TResult result = default(TResult);
        while (_NumRetries > 0)
        {
            try
            {
                result = _Method.Compile()();
                break;
            }
            catch
            {
                _OnFailureAction();
                _NumRetries--;
                if (_NumRetries <= 0) throw; // improved to avoid silent failure
                Thread.Sleep(_RetryTimeout);
            }
        }
        return result;
    }

    public static TResult Do(Expression<Func<TResult>> method, int numRetries, TimeSpan retryTimeout, Action onFailureAction)
    {
        var retry = new Retry<TResult>(method, numRetries, retryTimeout, onFailureAction);
        return retry.Execute();
    }
}

ps. the LBushkin's solution does one more retry =D

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All other warnings, provisors and Raymond Chen notwithstanding; there's now a NuGet package for that: https://github.com/MitchDenny/Palmer

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My async implementation of the retry method:

public static async Task<T> DoAsync<T>(Func<dynamic> action, TimeSpan retryInterval, int retryCount = 3)
    {
        var exceptions = new List<Exception>();

        for (int retry = 0; retry < retryCount; retry++)
        {
            try
            {
                return await action().ConfigureAwait(false);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                exceptions.Add(ex);
            }

            await Task.Delay(retryInterval).ConfigureAwait(false);
        }
        throw new AggregateException(exceptions);
    }

Key points: I used .ConfigureAwait(false); and Func<dynamic> instead Func<T>

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This does not provide an answer to the question. Please consider posting your answer as a new question, using the "Ask Question" button at the top of the page, then posting your own answer to the question to share what you learned with the community. –  Ed Cottrell Mar 7 at 5:47
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Or how about doing it a bit neater....

int retries = 3;
while (retries > 0)
{
  if (DoSomething())
  {
    retries = 0;
  }
  else
  {
    retries--;
  }
}

I believe throwing exceptions should generally be avoided as a mechanism unless your a passing them between boundaries (such as building a library other people can use). Why not just have the DoSomething() command return true if it was successful and false otherwise?

EDIT: And this can be encapsulated inside a function like others have suggested as well. Only problem is if you are not writing the DoSomething() function yourself

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5  
"I believe throwing exceptions should generally be avoided as a mechanism unless your a passing them between boundaries" - I completely disagree. How do you know the caller checked your false (or worse, null) return? WHY did the code fail? False tells you nothing else. What if the caller has to pass the failure up the stack? Read msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229014.aspx - these are for libraries, but they make just as much sense for internal code. And on a team, other people are likely to call your code. –  TrueWill Oct 14 '09 at 1:28
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