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I am currently trying to use cmake for a project of mine. The structure of it is pretty trivial, consisting of main folder and a 'library' subfolder also containing headers and source files:

./            sourceA.cpp ...
./lib/        sourceB.cpp headerB.cpp ...

I wish to let the user define some constants which then should be used by the preprocessor to replace some placeholders, like: char data[DIMENSION]

In in the main directory I use the following CMakeLists.txt to ask for the value and set it:

...
set(DATASET_DIMENSION "4" CACHE STRING "The dimensions of the dataset used.")
set_property(
    GLOBAL
    PROPERTY COMPILE_DEFINITIONS DIMENSION=${DATASET_DIMENSION}
    APPEND
)
add_subdirectory(lib)
...

In the subdirectory, the CMakeLists.txt mainly adds the source files and calls add_library(lib ${lib_SOURCES}).

The problem: If I execute make, the compiler complains that the DIMENSION has not been replaced:

.../lib/someheader.h:7:19:error: ‘DIMENSION’ undeclared here (not in a function)

What is wrong with my configuration? I tried to follow the examples of cmake where they specify (my emphasis):

CMake when executed in the top-level directory will process the CMakeLists.txt file and then descend into the listed subdirectories. Variables, include paths, library paths, etc. are inherited.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should be able to just do the following in your main CMakeLists.txt:

add_definitions(-DDIMENSION=${DATASET_DIMENSION})

The problem with yours is that COMPILE_DEFINITIONS is not a property of global scope, so setting this has no effect. You're maybe mixing this up with the directory-scope property?

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This seems to work now. Thank you! –  Patrick Mar 28 '13 at 13:48

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