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I try to use mmap to allocate readable, writeable and executable memory.

I write x86_32 assembly language.

The code in the memory basically tries to jump to a function, but I get segmentation fault all the time.

The following is my C code.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<sys/mman.h>

void print();

char*p;

void out8(char v)
{
*p = v;
p++;
}
int main()
{

int j;
int addr;
int cnt = 0;
int * ptr;
addr = (int)(&print);
p = (char*)mmap (NULL, 100, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE|PROT_EXEC, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_ANONYMOUS, -1, 0);
printf("p : %x\n",(int)p);
int relAddr = addr;
void(*f)() = (void(*)())p;
if(p == MAP_FAILED)puts("map failed");

out8('\x55'); // push esp
out8('\x89'); out8('\xe5'); // mov esp ebp
out8('\x50'); // push eax
out8('\x51'); // push ecx
out8('\x52'); // push edx

out8('\xe9');  // relative jump opcode
relAddr = ( (int)p) - ((int)print) + 4;
out8( (relAddr) & 0xff);
out8( (relAddr>>8) & 0xff);
out8( (relAddr>>16) & 0xff);
out8( (relAddr>>24) & 0xff);

    f();

return 0;
}

void print()
{
fprintf(stderr,"hi\n");
exit(1);    
}

I expect the program would print "hi" and terminate. If you have any hint on the problem, I would be grateful.

share|improve this question
    
Isn't the relative address for the jump subtracted the wrong way around? –  harold Mar 26 '13 at 10:51
    
An old answer that gives sample code for this type of problem: stackoverflow.com/a/5006231/512360 - uses absolute jumps but can be coded the same way with relative ones (that is, using call or jmp) ... provided that the "trampoline buffer" and actual target function address are within 2GB of each other. –  FrankH. Mar 26 '13 at 12:32

1 Answer 1

Here is a corrected version:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/mman.h>
#include <stdint.h>

char * buf; // start of buffer                                                  
char * p;   // current pointer in buffer                                        

void out8 (uint8_t x)
{
    *p++ = (char)x;
}

void out32 (uint32_t x)
{
    out8 (x & 0xFF);
    out8 ((x >> 8) & 0xFF);
    out8 ((x >> 16) & 0xFF);
    out8 (x >> 24);
}

void init_buffer ()
{
    buf = mmap (NULL, 100, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE|PROT_EXEC,
                MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_ANONYMOUS, -1, 0);
    if (buf == MAP_FAILED) {
        perror ("mmap");
        exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    p = buf;
}

void run_buffer ()
{
    (*((void (*)())buf))();
}

void emit_call (intptr_t &addr)
{
    intptr_t rel_addr;

    rel_addr = addr - ((intptr_t)p + 5); 
    out8('\xe8');
    out32(rel_addr);
}

void emit_ret ()
{
    out8('\xc3');
}  

void hello ()
{
    printf ("Hello World!\n");
}

void fill_buffer ()
{
    emit_call ((intptr_t)&hello);
    emit_ret ();                                            
}

int main ()
{
    init_buffer ();
    fill_buffer ();
    run_buffer ()

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
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