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I have already made a post some time ago to ask about a good design for LRU caching (in C++). You can find the question, the answer and some code there:

Better understanding the LRU algorithm

I have now tried to multi-thread this code (using pthread) and came with some really unexpected results. Before even attempting to use locking, I have created a system in which each thread accesses its own cache (see code). I run this code on a 4 cores processor. I tried to run it with 1 thread and 4 thread. When it runs on 1 thread I do 1 million lookups in the cache, on 4 threads, each threads does 250K lookups. I was expecting to get a time reduction with 4 threads but get the opposite. 1 threads runs in 2.2 seconds, 4 threads runs in more than 6 seconds?? I just can't make sense of this result.

Is something wrong with my code? Can this be explained somehow (thread management takes time). It would be great to have the feedback from experts. Thanks a lot -

I compile this code with: c++ -o cache cache.cpp -std=c++0x -O3 -lpthread

#include <stdio.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/syscall.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <sys/time.h>

#include <list>

#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstdio>
#include <memory>
#include <list>
#include <unordered_map> 

#include <stdint.h>
#include <iostream>

typedef uint32_t data_key_t;

using namespace std;
//using namespace std::tr1;

class TileData
{
public:
    data_key_t theKey;
    float *data;
    static const uint32_t tileSize = 32;
    static const uint32_t tileDataBlockSize;
    TileData(const data_key_t &key) : theKey(key), data(NULL)
    {
        float *data = new float [tileSize * tileSize * tileSize];
    }
    ~TileData()
    { 
        /* std::cerr << "delete " << theKey << std::endl; */
        if (data) delete [] data;   
    }
};

typedef shared_ptr<TileData> TileDataPtr;   // automatic memory management!

TileDataPtr loadDataFromDisk(const data_key_t &theKey)
{
    return shared_ptr<TileData>(new TileData(theKey));
}

class CacheLRU
{
public:
    list<TileDataPtr> linkedList;
    unordered_map<data_key_t, TileDataPtr> hashMap; 
    CacheLRU() : cacheHit(0), cacheMiss(0) {}
    TileDataPtr getData(data_key_t theKey)
    {
        unordered_map<data_key_t, TileDataPtr>::const_iterator iter = hashMap.find(theKey);
        if (iter != hashMap.end()) {
            TileDataPtr ret = iter->second;
            linkedList.remove(ret);
            linkedList.push_front(ret);
            ++cacheHit;
            return ret;
        }
        else {
            ++cacheMiss;
            TileDataPtr ret = loadDataFromDisk(theKey);
            linkedList.push_front(ret);
            hashMap.insert(make_pair<data_key_t, TileDataPtr>(theKey, ret));
            if (linkedList.size() > MAX_LRU_CACHE_SIZE) {
                const TileDataPtr dropMe = linkedList.back();
                hashMap.erase(dropMe->theKey);
                linkedList.remove(dropMe);
            }
            return ret;
        }

    }
    static const uint32_t MAX_LRU_CACHE_SIZE = 100;
    uint32_t cacheMiss, cacheHit;
};

int numThreads = 1;

void *testCache(void *data)
{
    struct timeval tv1, tv2;
    // Measuring time before starting the threads...
    double t = clock();
    printf("Starting thread, lookups %d\n", (int)(1000000.f / numThreads));
    CacheLRU *cache = new CacheLRU;
    for (uint32_t i = 0; i < (int)(1000000.f / numThreads); ++i) {
        int key = random() % 300;
        TileDataPtr tileDataPtr = cache->getData(key);
    }
    std::cerr << "Time (sec): " << (clock() - t) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC << std::endl;
    delete cache;
}

int main()
{
    int i;
    pthread_t thr[numThreads];
    struct timeval tv1, tv2;
    // Measuring time before starting the threads...
    gettimeofday(&tv1, NULL);
#if 0
    CacheLRU *c1 = new CacheLRU;
    (*testCache)(c1);
#else
    for (int i = 0; i < numThreads; ++i) {
        pthread_create(&thr[i], NULL, testCache, (void*)NULL);
        //pthread_detach(thr[i]);
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < numThreads; ++i) {
        pthread_join(thr[i], NULL);
        //pthread_detach(thr[i]);
    }
#endif  

    // Measuring time after threads finished...
    gettimeofday(&tv2, NULL);

    if (tv1.tv_usec > tv2.tv_usec)
    {
        tv2.tv_sec--;
        tv2.tv_usec += 1000000;
    }

    printf("Result - %ld.%ld\n", tv2.tv_sec - tv1.tv_sec,
           tv2.tv_usec - tv1.tv_usec);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
WHat does "loadDataFromDisk" do? – Mats Petersson Mar 26 '13 at 10:39
    
Is the lock (spinlock or mutex) actually used? – Mats Petersson Mar 26 '13 at 10:39
    
The "LoadDataFromDisk" would actually access a file from disk, load some data from it, process this data and return it in the form of that TileData object. I played with spinlock and mutex before actually deciding not to use them at all and allowing the threads to use a local instance of the CacheLRU class (avoiding the need for locking). I will remove them for clarity. – user18490 Mar 26 '13 at 10:45
    
Actually I found bug in the code but I don't really understand why it does that: hashMap.insert(make_pair<data_key_t, TileDataPtr>(theKey, ret)); "doesn't seem to work" in the sense that if I print ret.use_count() I get 0. So it seems like when I insert 'ret' in the map, then the map takes ownership of the pointer, and the shared_ptr count is set to 0? If I do: hashMap.insert(make_pair<data_key_t, TileDataPtr>(theKey, TileDataPtr(ret))); ret.count is incremented by 1 after the insert() call? – user18490 Mar 26 '13 at 12:32

I don't have a concrete answer yet. I can think of several possibilities. One is that testCache() is using random(), which is almost certainly implemented with a single global mutex. (Thus all of your threads are competing for the mutex, which is now ping-ponging between the caches.) ((That's assuming that random() is actually thread-safe on your system.))

Next, testCach() is accessing a CacheLRU which is implemented with unordered_maps and shared_ptrs. The unordered_maps, in particular might be implemented with some kind of global mutex underneath that is causing all of your threads to compete for access.

To really diagnose what is going on here you should do something much simpler inside of testCache(). (First try just taking the sqrt() of an input variable 250K times (vs. 1M times). Then try linearly accessing a C array of size 250K (or 1M). Slowly build up to the complex thing you are currently doing.)

Another possibility has to do with the pthread_join. pthread_join doesn't return until all the threads are done. So if one is taking longer than the others, you are measuring the slowest one. Your computation here seems balanced, but perhaps your OS is doing something unexpected? (Like mapping several threads to one core (perhaps because you have a hyper-threaded processor?, or one thread is moving from one core to another in the middle of the run (perhaps because the OS thinks it is smart when it is not.)

share|improve this answer
    
I seem to have found already something I can't make sense of (see my comment above). Aslo I really don't understand when I run this code and just watch the memory, it keeps allocating memory (i see it going up and up and up). So it seems like even through the constructor of TileData is called, somehow memory is not properly released?? I am still trying to debug this, but I fund the whole things really strange! – user18490 Mar 26 '13 at 12:39
    
Your code is much too complex to be understood in one go. Start with something much simpler and build up to what you really want. – Wandering Logic Mar 26 '13 at 12:45
    
I think make_pair copies its arguments. So the reference count gets incremented during the time that make_pair is running and then gets decremented before you print ret.use_count(). – Wandering Logic Mar 26 '13 at 12:47
    
When I try this code TileDataPtr a(new TileData(0)); std::cerr << "1 >> " << a.use_count() << std::endl; std::cerr << "1 >> " << a.use_count() << std::endl; hashMap.insert(make_pair<data_key_t, TileDataPtr>(0, a)); std::cerr << "2 >> " << a.use_count() << std::endl; hashMap.erase(0); std::cerr << "3 >> " << a.use_count() << std::endl; (sorry for the formating) I get 1, 0, 0 when I am expecting 1 2 1??? – user18490 Mar 26 '13 at 12:54
    
@user18490: I'm sorry, I don't know. I was trying to answer your original question, which is about why you aren't getting speedups. I think the answer to your original question is that you are calling random(), and that perhaps the unordered_hashmaps also have a mutex hiding somewhere deep in the implementation. I really think the answer is to try something much simpler to diagnose your speedup problems. And also try something different, and much simpler (not involving threads) to understand how unordered_hashmaps and shared_ptrs actually work. – Wandering Logic Mar 26 '13 at 13:01

This will be a bit of a "build it up" answer. I'm running your code on a Fedora 16 Linux system with a 4-core AMD cpu and 16GB of RAM.

I can confirm that I'm seeing similar "slower with more threads" behaviour. I removed the random function, which doesn't improve things at all.

I'm going to make some other minor changes.

share|improve this answer
    
Any chance you could understand and explain why the memory keeps growing either? I know it's a slightly different problem, but this is also very much bugging me? I have counted the number of times the constructor and destructor of the class TileData are being called, and the numbers match! I have no idea why the memory keeps growing? Also be sure you make that change hashMap.insert(make_pair<data_key_t, TileDataPtr>(theKey, TileDataPtr(ret)));. Thank you for your time and help. – user18490 Mar 26 '13 at 13:34
    
Mats, thanks for looking into it. I found the problem, which was a bug I had made. Sorry for that as it is really a very bad mistake... Thanks for your time and checking/testing the code. – user18490 Mar 26 '13 at 14:10
up vote 0 down vote accepted

A thousand apologies, by keeping debugging the code I realised I made a really bad beginner's mistake, if you look at that code:

TileData(const data_key_t &key) : theKey(key), data(NULL)
{
    float *data = new float [tileSize * tileSize * tileSize];
}

from the TikeData class where data is supposed to actually be a member variable of the class... So the right code should be:

class TileData
{
public:
    float *data;
    TileData(const data_key_t &key) : theKey(key), data(NULL)
    {
        data = new float [tileSize * tileSize * tileSize];
        numAlloc++;
    }
};

I am so sorry about that! It's a mistake I have done in the past, and I guess prototyping is great, but it sometimes lead to do such stupid mistakes. I ran the code with 1 and 4 threads and do now see the speedup. 1 thread takes about 2.3 seconds, 4 threads takes 0.92 seconds. Thanks all for your help, and sorry if I made you lose your time ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
That may explain why it's allocating more and more memory. But I don't really see how that affects the runtime... But I will update accordingly. – Mats Petersson Mar 26 '13 at 14:32
    
I agree, but maybe if you can compile the code on your side with that change, and confirm what I am obserbing on my side, it would be great?! – user18490 Mar 26 '13 at 15:09
    
Yes, it would seem like allocating a much larger amount from the heap will indeed increase the runtime by a large amount. I have noticed this before, but not as significant as this. It is probably to some degree because the system has to recoup memory used for other purposes ("free" memory that isn't entirely free). – Mats Petersson Mar 26 '13 at 15:24

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