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I have wrote the following program:

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

my $nodesNumber = 100 ;
my $communitiesNumber = 10;
my $prob_communities = 0.3;

for my $i (1 .. $nodesNumber){
    for my $j (1 .. $communitiesNumber){
    my $random_number=rand();
        if ($prob_comunities > $random_number){
            say "$i $j";
        }
    }
}

This program gives as output a list of two columns of integers as:

1 2
1 4
2 2
2 5
2 7
...

I would like to create a vector in wich the first element in the left column is counted once and the right column elements represents the value of the vector's components. The output should be in this case:

vector[0][0]= 1
vector[0][1]= 2
vector[0][2]= 4
vector[1][0]= 2
vector[1][1]= 2
vector[1][2]= 5
vector[1][3]= 7

Any help?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
#!/usr/bin/env perl
# file: build_vector.pl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @vector;       # the 2-d vector
my %mark;         # mark the occurrence of the number in the first column
my $index = -1;   # first dimensional index of the vector

while (<>) {
    chomp;
    my ($first, $second) = split /\s+/;
    next if $second eq '';
    if (not exists $mark{$first}) {
        $mark{ $first } = ++$index;
        push @{ $vector[$index] }, $first;
    }
    push @{ $vector[$index] }, $second;
}

# dump results
for my $i (0..$#vector) {
    for my $j (0..$#{ $vector[$i] }) {
        print "$vector[$i][$j] ";
    }
    print "\n";
}

This script will processing the output of your script and build the vector in @vector. If your script has filename generator.pl, you can call:

$ perl generator.pl | perl build_vector.pl

UPDATE:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $nodesNumber = 100 ;
my $communitiesNumber = 10;
my $prob_communities = 0.3;

my @vector;       # the 2-d vector
my %mark;         # mark the occurrence of the number in the first column
my $index = -1;   # first dimensional index of the vector

for my $i (1 .. $nodesNumber){
    for my $j (1 .. $communitiesNumber){
    my $random_number=rand();
        if ($prob_communities > $random_number){
            if (not exists $mark{$i}) {
                $mark{ $i } = ++$index;
                push @{ $vector[$index] }, $i;
            }
            push @{ $vector[$index] }, $j;
        }
    }
}

# dump results
for my $i (0..$#vector) {
    for my $j (0..$#{ $vector[$i] }) {
        print "$vector[$i][$j] ";
    }
    print "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
This script have to be added to mine? If i create an output file with the data that I generate, I just have to put the file handle $fh into the while(<>)? –  Valerio D. Ciotti Mar 26 '13 at 12:00
    
If I just add it in the complete script it produces nothing. –  Valerio D. Ciotti Mar 26 '13 at 12:07
    
@ValerioD.Ciotti Yes. Or you can replace your say "$i $j" with $_ = "$i $j" and paste the logic from chomp; to second push (with the next if line excluded) to your script to combine the two script together. Don't forget to declare the variables. –  Arie Shaw Mar 26 '13 at 12:09
    
run perl build_vector.pl your_data_file_path and you should get the results. –  Arie Shaw Mar 26 '13 at 12:11
    
may you just edit it for the solution without the file data, because I sow that making the program load the datas from a file take too much time and I am sure that it won t if I do without the file data. thank you really much. –  Valerio D. Ciotti Mar 26 '13 at 15:25
#!/usr/bin/env perl

use 5.010;
use strict;
use warnings;

use Const::Fast;
use Math::Random::MT;

const my $MAX_RAND => 10;

my $rng = Math::Random::MT->new;

my @v = map {
    my $l = $rng->irand;
    [ map 1 + int($rng->rand($MAX_RAND)), 0 .. int($l) ];
} 1 .. 5;

use YAML;
print Dump \@v;
share|improve this answer
    
May you explain a bit? random number that are produced by rand() are from 0 to 1. I see there that you use the Math::Random::MT, does it the same thing? The MAX_LENGHTS is for the lenghts of the vector? –  Valerio D. Ciotti Mar 26 '13 at 11:25
    
Math::Random::MT::rand mimics Perl's builtin rand. $MAX_LENGTH is the maximum length of a vector, and $MAX_RAND is the maximum number that can be in a vector. –  Sinan Ünür Mar 26 '13 at 11:28
    
I can't know before the max lenghts or the maximum that can be in a vector because it is just random. I know that in perl is not necessary to know the lenghts of a vector as in C or other languages. Is it possibile to have the leghts variable without write the maximum? –  Valerio D. Ciotti Mar 26 '13 at 11:35
    
Sure you can. Do you want a vector that is longer than 4294967295 elements? In any analysis, there must be a bound on the size of the sample you want to generate. But then, it is trivial to get rid of that requirement. Then you can ponder why your program crashes during some runs and not others. –  Sinan Ünür Mar 26 '13 at 11:53

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