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I have a reference tables with two numeric columns which define a range, for instance employees for an account and for each employee range I get a company size :

employeeMin   employeeMax   Size
1             100           small
101           2000          medium
2001          10000         medium-large
10001         100000        large

...and so on

and I need to return Size given a parameter, say 110 would return 'medium' as you see second column is always = first column+1

so I was wondering if it better to implement it in sql like above with two columns, or should i use only the employeeMax and maybe order and return first record? I would expect a pattern to exist? maybe self joins or similar? I did some research but couldnt find...

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can you have 100 full-time and 1 half-time employee? what RDMS - MySQL 5, Oracle 11g, SQL Server 2008? what will be the most common uses - join with accounts table with actual number of employees? how often do you want to update these categories? did you consider a config file you load in your program on startup instead of with each particular query? –  Aprillion Mar 27 '13 at 16:34

3 Answers 3

It all depends all on your goals, e.g.:

maintainability - use 1 column if you don't read it often or use any kind of optimization (e.g. materialized views)

employeeMax   Size
100           small
2000          medium
10000         medium-large
100000        large

select *
from accounts a
join (      
    select
        cs1.emploeeAbove,
        coalesce(min(cs2.emploeeAbove), 999999999) employeeMax,
        Size
    from company_sizes cs1
    left join company_sizes cs2
        on cs2.employeeAbove > cs1.employeeAbove
    group by cs1.employeeAbove, Size
) cs
    on a.emploees > cs.employeeAbove
    and a.employees <= cs.employeeMax

faster joins - use 2 column design if you have milions of records and you don't figure out how to optimise the previous approach

employeeAbove   employeeMax   Size
0               100           small
100             2000          medium
2000            10000         medium-large
10000           100000        large

select *
from accounts a
join company_sizes cs
    on a.emploees > cs.employeeAbove
    and a.employees <= cs.employeeMax
share|improve this answer
    
Nice one, although I think 0 is misplaced. A company with 0 employees is not a small company, it is a non-company. –  Andriy M Mar 29 '13 at 18:52
    
1) that's the meaning of "above." 2) i co-own a company that has no employees (i don't employ myself). it's not small, it's micro, but it indeed exists. –  Aprillion Mar 30 '13 at 16:45
    
Didn't realise a company without employees could exist de jure. Anyway, it was indeed your #1 that I missed: I didn't take notice of how you were actually using the lower bound. So, thanks for pointing that out for me. –  Andriy M Mar 30 '13 at 17:17
    
Thank you very much –  tom12345 Apr 3 '13 at 14:47
    
@tom12345 please accept an answer if you feel your original question was answered satisfactorily .. –  Aprillion Apr 4 '13 at 9:16

I recommend using only the employeeMin column, and remove employeeMax. This way, the max size is open-ended for "x-large" sizes you may have in the future.

 SELECT Size FROM yourtable WHERE employeeMin <= 110 ORDER BY employeeMin DESC LIMIT 1
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much –  tom12345 Apr 3 '13 at 14:47

I would definitely use one column, whether min or max. Among other things, this ensures that you don't have any gaps between your ranges. Assuming max, your table would look like:

employeeMax   Size
100           small
2000          medium
10000         medium-large
100000        large

And your query to get the actual ranges would be something like:

select 
     coalesce((select max(employeeMax) 
               from CompanySize b 
               where b.employeemax < a.employeemax),
              0) as employeeMin
     a.employeeMax, 
     a.size
from CompanySize

If your database supports analytic functions, you can simplify this somewhat:

select 
     coalesce(lag(employeeMax) over (order by employeemax asc),
              0) as employeeMin
     a.employeeMax, 
     a.size
from CompanySize
share|improve this answer
    
please feel free to iterate all pros and cons instead "among other things" ;) –  Aprillion Mar 27 '13 at 16:53
    
@deathApril: I'll admit that I tend to use that phrase as a hedge against the idea that there are good arguments that I haven't thought of. I'd rather leave the impression that there may be other good reasons to follow my suggestion, rather than the impression that there's only the one justification. –  Allan Mar 27 '13 at 20:21
    
Many thanks to both of you. –  tom12345 Apr 3 '13 at 14:46

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