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Please have a look at the following category... As far as I knew one can't add instance variable to categories..

.h

//
// Created by macbook on 17.01.13.
//
// To change the template use AppCode | Preferences | File Templates.
//


#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface NSMutableArray (Cache)
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSArray *backup;

- (void)restoreBackup;
@end

.m

//
// Created by macbook on 17.01.13.
//
// To change the template use AppCode | Preferences | File Templates.
//
#import "NSMutableArray+Cache.h"
#import <objc/runtime.h>
#define CEBackupKey @"Backup"
@implementation NSMutableArray (Cache)
#pragma mark - Properties
- (NSArray *)backup {
    return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, CEBackupKey);
}
- (void)setBackup:(NSArray *)backup {
    objc_setAssociatedObject(self, CEBackupKey, backup, OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC);
}
#pragma mark - Methods
- (void)restoreBackup {
    [self removeAllObjects];
    [self addObjectsFromArray:self.backup];
}
@end

can anyone explain in detail what is happening here..

and will this way of storing a backup take less memory rather than having a separate deep copy of this array...?

share|improve this question

objc_setAssociatedObject lets you associate a value with an object-key pair. Think of it like having an implicit, global NSMutableDictionary associated with each object. In fact, before associated objects were added to the runtime, a singleton dictionary-of-dictionaries would have been a way to accomplish the same thing. Here's a simplified example of how you could implement it yourself, ignoring issues like class loading, thread safety, and how to properly use objects as dictionary keys:

// Returns the global dictionary-of-dictionaries for associated objects
static NSMutableDictionary* getAssociationDict () {
    static dispatch_once_t once;
    static NSMutableDictionary* dict;
    dispatch_once(&once, ^{ dict = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init]; });
    return dict;
}

id my_objc_getAssociatedObject (id object, NSString* key) {
    return [[getAssociatedDict() objectForKey:object] objectForKey:key];
}

void my_objc_setAssociatedObject(id object, NSString* key, id value) {
    NSMutableDictionary* dict = getAssociationDict();
    NSMutableDictionary* objectDict = [dict objectForKey:object];
    // Create the per-object dictionary if it's missing
    if (! objectDict) {
        objectDict = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];
        [dict setObject:objectDict forKey:object];
    }
    [objectDict setObject:value forKey:key];
}

Though the above won't actually work, it's an outline of how it could be done.

share|improve this answer
    
and will this way of storing a backup take less memory rather than having a separate deep copy of this array...? – Ankit Srivastava Mar 26 '13 at 17:20
    
That all depends on what you're storing as the backup. The code example you gave doesn't actually create a backup, it just provides methods for saving (setBackup:) and restoring (restoreBackup) one. You still need to create that backup, and whether you use a deep copy or some other method is up to you. – Tony Mar 26 '13 at 20:03

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