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In my C# Windows Forms project I have:

  • mycontrol (it's keyboard)

  • myform (it's layout for textbox, and mycontrol )

I would like to run some code which is in myform, but by pressing button in mycontrol )

For example:

When I press Backspace button in mycontrol I just use Button Event

SendKeys.Send("{BACKSPACE}");

and myform textbox know that I press Backspace.

But I have some custom buttons (functional) and those buttons should be define in myform

for example in myform I have:

private void btnOK_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            DoSomething();

        }

The whole problem is - how to Run myform btnOK_Click or DoSomething from mycontrol

UPDATE #2:

Nothing happens while pressing D0, NullReference when I delete checking if it's null.

internal partial class myForm : BaseForms { public myForm() { InitializeComponent(); ShowMyControl(); }

private void ShowMyControl(){
    KeyboardControl myControl = new KeyboardControl();
  myControl.KeyboardKeyPressed += new Action<string>(OnMyControlKeyPressed);
  this.Controls.Add(myControl);
}

private void OnMyControlKeyPressed(string key)
{
    switch (key)
    {
        case "D0":
            MessageBox.Show("A");
            break;
        case "D1":
            MessageBox.Show("B");
            break;
        default:
            MessageBox.Show("C");
            break;
    }
}
...
}

and

public partial class KeyboardControl : UserControl
    {
    public event Action<string> KeyboardKeyPressed;
    ...
    private void HandlingMouseClick1(Point PressedItem)
        {
         ...
          case Keys.D0:
                            if (KeyboardKeyPressed != null)
                                KeyboardKeyPressed("D0");
                            break;
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Not sure if i understand your question can't you just call the method in the same way as you determine the condition for SendKeys ? –  V4Vendetta Mar 26 '13 at 12:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try out the below approach inside MyForm

    public class MyForm : Form
    {
    //.ctor
    MyForm() { }

    private void ShowMyControl(){
      MyControl myControl = new MyControl();
      myControl.KeyboardKeyPressed += new Action<string>(OnMyControlKeyPressed);
      this.Controls.Add(myControl);
    }

    private void OnMyControlKeyPressed(string key)
    {
     switch(key)
      {
       case "D0" :
        DoSomething();
        break;
       case "D1" :
        DoSomethingElse();
        break;
       default :
        SendKeys(key);
        break;
      }
    }
}

/*MyControl*/

namespace Keyboards
{
  public class MyControl : Control
  {

    public event Action<string> KeyboardKeyPressed;

    private void HandlingMouseClick(Point PressedItem)
    {
        if(KeyboardKeyPressed != null)
           KeyboardKeyPressed(PressedItem.ToString());
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It looks good. But I have some issue. I am trying to run KeyboardKeyPressed("D1"); from MyControl with result NullReference. –  boski Mar 27 '13 at 8:53
    
I've update my question code. –  boski Mar 27 '13 at 9:07
    
Ok it works! I just change to this.myControl.KeyboardKeyPressed += new Action<string>(OnMyControlKeyPressed); instead of craeting new control in ShowMyControl() –  boski Mar 27 '13 at 9:22

In MyForm_Load, or anywhere else if you dynamically initialize your MyControl, you can add something like MyControl.Click += new System.KeyEventHandler(this.MyControl_Click) and place a method called

private void MyControl_Click(sender object, KeyEventArgs e)
{
   ... //Find out which key was pressed, proceed.
}

in MyForm. The method will be called when the Click event is raised.

share|improve this answer

Use a delegate and pass it to the constructor of your second form.

public delegate void MyDelegate(Object SomeData);

You'll need to create a delegate according to the method's signature you want to use.

MyDelegate del = form1.DoSomething;
Form2 form2 = new Form2(..., del);

Then you can encapsulate a method from your form1 and pass it to form2 and then invoke it in form2.

public Form2(..., MyDelegate del){ }

del.Invoke();

Look here for delegates.

share|improve this answer
    
I update my question. I can't even put your example into my project... –  boski Mar 26 '13 at 13:44
    
I did not provide an example, just a hint. Check on delegates and how to use them. Define a delegate in your form1, and pass it to form2 in the constructor of form2. –  bash.d Mar 26 '13 at 13:47
    
No overload for 'DoSomething' matches delegate myForm.MyDelegate –  boski Mar 26 '13 at 14:11
    
You will need to adapt the delegate to your needs. You will need to define the signature of the delegate accordingly. If you have no return-value and pass no data it is public delegate void MyDelegate(); –  bash.d Mar 26 '13 at 14:13
    
Well it won't work. I can't use form1 name. I should pass whole function from myform to mycontrol. Not calling myform methods from mycontrol. Thanks anyway. –  boski Mar 26 '13 at 14:28

Your control should expose an event that the form can then subscribe to and act upon.

Give your event a meaningful name. If your control contains a Search button and the user clicks it, let your control fire an event called SearchButtonClicked, for instance.

Then the form can contain a method that subscribes to the SearchButtonClicked event, and that code will then be executed whenever the user clicks the Search button.

See also the Events Tutorial on MSDN.

share|improve this answer
    
or more generically CustomButtonClicked and pass an enumeration in the event args. –  James Barrass Mar 26 '13 at 12:23
    
JamesB, that would certainly work, however (my 2 cents) that would be a bit less readable. –  Roy Dictus Mar 26 '13 at 13:18
    
I think it would depend on how many buttons there are. Less than 5 I think without the enumeration would be more readable, with lots I think the enum would help. –  James Barrass Mar 26 '13 at 16:50

Add a reference of MyForm in your MyControl class

class MyControl
{
    MyForm _form=null;
    MyControl(MyForm form)
    {
        _form=form;
    }

    void DoSth()
    { 
        if(_form!=null)
           _form.DoSomething();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Terrible design, sorry... A control should not have knowledge about who uses it. With "who" I mean the form it is on or the other control(s) that it is a part of... This violates the abstraction principle. –  Roy Dictus Mar 26 '13 at 11:59
    
Ridiculous. You will have no flexibility if you just keep every design pattern in mind without looking at the detailed requirement. You comment is not constructive, in my view, this is not very useful to bash.d at all. –  David Mar 26 '13 at 12:01
    
Sorry you feel that way, David. Please do make the effort to learn proper object orientation, and you will see that this "design" makes no sense at all. There is no way anyone can maintain large projects that are designed in the way you propose above. I find my comment quite constructive, maybe it is not what you wanted to read, but if this helps you and others in any way to avoid the common mistake of violating basic design principles, then it has served its purpose. –  Roy Dictus Mar 26 '13 at 12:05
    
Forget about your theory. I don't see any design pattern that can work for all scenarios. When we talk about a design pattern, we always discuss it in some context. Bidirectional communication is sometimes needed, not always a bad design. –  David Mar 26 '13 at 12:08
1  
I agree with Roy, given that anyone has taken the time and effort to create a control instead of just writing code in form, why would you want to limit the use of the control to only that form? –  James Barrass Mar 26 '13 at 12:22

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