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This c# code just doesn't want to change Password on the server (UserID and PW will obviously be a strings for some purpose, but this is just to get it working):

SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection ("Data Source=ServerIP;Persist Security Info=False;User ID=UserID;Password=UserPW");
SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand ("ALTER LOGIN UserID WITH PASSWORD='NewPW' OLD_PASSWORD='UserPW'", conn);
cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
conn.Open();
conn.Close();

Changing Password using the same command ALTER LOGIN UserID WITH PASSWORD='NewPW' OLD_PASSWORD='UserPW' with a Server Management studio works like a charm, so there is no problem within command line or/and permissions for this particular User. I guess I miss something in Sql Connection line. Already tried combinations of:

Initial Catalog=master;
Initial Catalog=;
Integrated Security=SSPI;
Persist Security Info=True;

Changing command type, using ExecuteNonQuery();, and many other things, but nothing seems to work.

"Google" doesn't give any valuable result, hopefully I will find my answer here, thanks for taking your time in advance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try the following, works a treat for me:

SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection ("Data Source=ServerIP;Persist Security Info=False;User ID=UserID;Password=UserPW");
SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand ("ALTER LOGIN UserID WITH PASSWORD='NewPW' OLD_PASSWORD='UserPW'", conn);
cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
conn.Open();
cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
conn.Close();

You forgot to put cmd.ExecuteNonQuery() after you opened the connection. I just tested this and it successfully changed the password on my local database.

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I have mention this in my initial post, anyway thanks, it works exactly in this way. Seems like the problem was server side, adm fixed it somehow. –  Alt Mar 26 '13 at 13:14
string queryString = @"DECLARE @sql NVARCHAR(500)
               SET @sql = 'ALTER LOGIN ' + QuoteName(@loginName) + 
                    ' WITH PASSWORD= ' + QuoteName(@password, '''') 
               EXEC @sql ";

using (var connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
{
    var command = new SqlCommand(queryString, connection);
    command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@loginName", loginName);
    command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@password", password);

    connection.Open();
    command.ExecuteNonQuery()
}

UPDATE

With DDL (data definition language) statements (as ALTER LOGIN) you cannot use parameters directly. That's why I'm using a dynamic SQL.

The QuoteName will do proper quoting in the SQL, simply doubles any [ characters (first call) or ' characters (second call).

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-2: Quotename is for returning object names in a correctly quoted fashion, and creating dynamic SQL for no reason opens it up to SQL injection. –  cjk Mar 26 '13 at 12:28
    
Where do you see SQL Injection here ? –  Petar Repac Mar 26 '13 at 12:30
    
OK I take back the SQL injection, but why not just pass in the params without the whole construct and execute SQL? That is the point of them. –  cjk Mar 26 '13 at 12:34
    
IMO the ALTER LOGIN statement won't work with variables directly. The QuoteName will do proper quoting in the SQL, simply doubles any [ characters (first call) or ' characters (second call). –  Petar Repac Mar 26 '13 at 12:43
    
So, I rechecked and with DDL (data definition language) statements you cannot use parameters directly. That's why I'm using a dynamic SQL in my solution. There is also no SQL injection going on here, so don't see any reason for minus point. –  Petar Repac Mar 26 '13 at 12:50

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