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I have created two template project in Eclipse with CDT plugin(one is C project, another C++), and have compiled two very similar projects(as for me) but I get absolutely different console outputs. Why this outputs so different? C code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void) {
    int numbers[5];
      int * p;
      p = numbers;  *p = 10;
      p++;  *p = 20;
      p = &numbers[2];  *p = 30;
      p = numbers + 3;  *p = 40;
      p = numbers;  *(p+4) = 50;
      int n;
      for (n=0; n<5; n++)
        printf("%c ",numbers[n]);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

output some garbage

C++ code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    int numbers[5];
      int * p;
      p = numbers;  *p = 10;
      p++;  *p = 20;
      p = &numbers[2];  *p = 30;
      p = numbers + 3;  *p = 40;
      p = numbers;  *(p+4) = 50;
      for (int n=0; n<5; n++)
        cout << numbers[n] << " ";
    return 0;
}

output

10, 20, 30, 40, 50

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closed as too localized by Bo Persson, 0x499602D2, Jens Gustedt, Mysticial, Anthon Mar 27 '13 at 6:54

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5  
Have you tried the %d format option in printf? %c is for single characters. –  Joseph Mansfield Mar 26 '13 at 12:08
    
Why are you setting p equal to numbers? More importantly, why not just numbers[0], numbers[1], etc? –  user195488 Mar 26 '13 at 12:08
4  
A beautiful example of what's wrong with printf (in addition to its lack of safety and its lack of extensibility). –  James Kanze Mar 26 '13 at 12:10
    
By the way, if you are confused as to why some people are suggesting %d and some %i, they do the exact same thing in this case. From Wikipedia: "d, i : int as a signed decimal number. '%d' and '%i' are synonymous for output, but are different when used with scanf() for input (using %i will interpret a number as hexadecimal if it's preceded by 0x, and octal if it's preceded by 0.)" –  BoBTFish Mar 26 '13 at 12:19
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4 Answers

You are printing int as char in C.

Change

printf("%c ",numbers[n]);

to

printf("%d ",numbers[n]);
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You print the ASCII value of the integers. Try

printf("%i", numbers[n])

instead of

printf("%c", numbers[n])
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You're trying to output the numbers as characters, causing your odd output. The code worked fine for me as this.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void) {
int numbers[5];
  int * p;
  p = numbers;  *p = 10;
  p++;  *p = 20;
  p = &numbers[2];  *p = 30;
  p = numbers + 3;  *p = 40;
  p = numbers;  *(p+4) = 50;
  int n;
  for (n=0; n<5; n++)
    printf("%d ",numbers[n]);
return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Note the %d, rather than %c

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You need %d to print integer and %c to print char in C

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstdio/printf/

Look at your below statement

printf("%c ",numbers[n]);

You are using %c to print int, which is wrong.

To be specific printf has been borrowed from C and has some limitations. The most common mentioned limitation of printf is type safety, as it relies on the programmer to correctly match the format string with the arguments. The second limitation that comes again from the varargs environment is that you cannot extend the behavior with user defined types. The printf knows how to print a set of types, and that's all that you will get out of it. Still, it for the few things that it can be used for, it is faster and simpler to format strings with printf than with c++ streams.

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