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I have a class that uses a web service that looks roughly like this:

public class MyService : IMyService
{
    private readonly IAuxilaryService1 auxilaryService1;
    private readonly IAuxilaryService2 auxilaryService2;
    private readonly IAuxilaryService3 auxilaryService3;
    private IWebService service;

    public MyService()
    {
        auxilaryService1 = new AuxilaryService1();
        auxilaryService2 = new AuxilaryService2();
        auxilaryService3 = new AuxilaryService3();
    }

    public void DoSomething(
        string Param1,
        string Param2
        )
    {
        service = new WebService(auxilaryService1, auxilaryService2, auxilaryService3); 

        var response = service.DoSomething(Param1, Param2);
        /* ... */
    }

And then a unit test trying to test this doing this:

private Mock webService;

    [SetUp]
    public void SetUp()
    {
       webService = new Mock<IWebService>();
    }

    [Test]
    public void MyService_DoSomethingTest()
    {
        IMyService myService = new MyService();

        webService.Setup(x => x.DoSomething(It.IsAny<string>(), It.IsAny<string>()))
                       .Returns(new Response() { Status = "Foo"});


        myService.DoSomething("Param1", "Param2");

        webService.Verify(x => x.DoSomething(It.IsAny<string>(), It.IsAny<string>()));
    }

First of all is this a good way to test "MyService" and second of all, for some reason the Interface is not intercepted properly so in my test, even though I do ask for the webService inside myService to return a fake response, the actual instance still gets called and the test fails with a Soap exception. I know Moq needs interfaces or virtual methods, but I provide an interface Mock so why does it not intercept it? Any ideas?

I need to add that I'm testing custom umbraco contour workflow types and I have no control over the constructor. If I change it the project will break.

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why was this downgraded? –  Nick Mar 26 '13 at 12:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In order to test your class, you should pass mocked dependency into that class under test. In your case all dependencies are hard coded in MyService (they are instantiated in the class). Use dependency injection to provide dependencies:

public class MyService : IMyService
{
    private readonly IAuxilaryService1 auxilaryService1;
    private readonly IAuxilaryService2 auxilaryService2;
    private readonly IAuxilaryService3 auxilaryService3;
    private IWebService service;

    // constructor injection
    public MyService(IAuxilaryService1 service1,
                     IAuxilaryService2 service2,
                     IAuxilaryService3 service3)
    {
        auxilaryService1 = service1;
        auxilaryService2 = service2;
        auxilaryService3 = service3;
    }

    // pass IWebService into method
    public void DoSomething(string Param1, string Param2, IWebService service)
    {
        this.service = service;                
        var response = service.DoSomething(Param1, Param2);
        /* ... */
    }
}

And now how test should look like:

private IMyService myService;

[SetUp]
public void SetUp()
{
    IAuxilaryService1 service1 = new Mock<IAuxilaryService1>();
    IAuxilaryService2 service2 = new Mock<IAuxilaryService2>();
    IAuxilaryService3 service3 = new Mock<IAuxilaryService3>();
    myService = new MyService(service1.Object,
                              service2.Object,
                              service3.Object);       
}

[Test]
public void MyService_DoSomethingTest()
{
    // Arrange
    webService = new Mock<IWebService>();

    webService.Setup(x => x.DoSomething(It.IsAny<string>(), It.IsAny<string>()))
              .Returns(new Response() { Status = "Foo"});
    // Act
    myService.DoSomething("Param1", "Param2", webService.Object);
    // Assert
    webService.Verify(x => x.DoSomething(It.IsAny<string>(),It.IsAny<string>()));
}

BTW it's strange that you are instantiating webService inside DoSomething method and assign webService to class field. Maybe you need webService passed into your class via constructor also?

share|improve this answer
    
That means a lot messier code. I will now have to instantiate all the auxilary services outside my class, and also initialise the webService in each class where it's being used just so that I can pass them as a parameter. Isn't there a way that doesn't require a lot of code duplication? –  Nick Mar 26 '13 at 12:27
    
@Nick that means clean code. Dependencies should be instantiated outside your class. Class should depend on abstractions instead of implementations. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Mar 26 '13 at 12:28
    
Let's assume my service is used in 20 different places. Now I can no longer do myService = new MyService(); and later myService.DoSomething();. I'll have to initialize all the auxilary services in each class where it's used and initialise the service. Not sure this is cleaner. It's also a lot of work –  Nick Mar 26 '13 at 12:30
    
@Nick that is option called poor man's dependency injection –  Sergey Berezovskiy Mar 26 '13 at 12:30
    
@Nick with dependency injection framework you don't need to instantiate classes manually. And remember, when you are unit-testing some class, that class should be the only real object during test. All other dependencies should be mocked, which is impossible if you create some dependencies in class. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Mar 26 '13 at 12:32

You're never injecting the mocked instance to myService. You could create a constructor to inject the dependency. Something like this

  public MyService(IWebService service)
  {
      this.service = service;
  }

And then you have to use this constructor on your test.

share|improve this answer
    
Well.. that would work but it means a lot of refactoring of the existing code where this service is used :/ –  Nick Mar 26 '13 at 12:23
    
@Nick: that what you have to do if you want to mock, I'm afraid there is no magic, you're creating a mock but never using it. –  Claudio Redi Mar 26 '13 at 12:24
1  
@Nick:BTW: You don't have to change the existing constructor but adding a new one so all code around will still work –  Claudio Redi Mar 26 '13 at 12:30
    
Hey thanks, I did that... –  Nick Mar 26 '13 at 12:44

The implementation is not using the mocked instance, because of this line:

service = new WebService(auxilaryService1, auxilaryService2, auxilaryService3); 

Welcome to dependency injection. If you want to mock this object, MyService need to ask for it rather than make it.

Make your code look like this:

private readonly IWebService webService;

public MyService(IWebService webService)
{
  this.webService = webService;
}

public void DoSomething(...)
{
   var response = webService.DoSomething(Param1, Param2);
    /* ... */
}

And in your test, you'll need to pass your mock instance to the constructor:

IMyService myService = new MyService(webService);
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