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I'm having a peculiar issue with a shell script that I have set to run every minute via crontab.

I use Pelican as a blog platform and wanted to semi-automate the way in which the site updates whenever there's a new post. To do this, I've created a script to look for a file called respawn in the same directory as the content (it syncs via Dropbox so I simply create the file there which syncs to the server).

The script is written so that if the file respawn exists then it rebuilds the blog and deletes it. If it's not, it exits instead.

Here's the script called publish.sh

#!/bin/bash
Respawn="/home/user/content/respawn"
if [ -f $Respawn ]
then
   sudo /home/user/sb.sh;rm $Respawn
else
    exit 0
fi
exit 0

Here's the crontab for the shell script

* * * * * /home/user/publish.sh

And finally, here's the contents of sb.sh

make html -C /var/www/site/

Now, if I run the script via SSH and respawn exists, it works perfectly. However, if I let the cron do it then it doesn't run the shell script but it still deletes the respawn file.

I have one other cron job that runs every 4 hours that simply runs sb.sh which works perfectly (in case I forget to publish something).

I've tried using the user's crontab as well as adding it to root instead and I've also added the user to the sudoers file so it can be run without password intervention. Neither seem to work. Am I missing something?

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One obvious guess would be that cron doesn't have PATH to find sudo, can you try putting /usr/bin/sudo in your script, rather than just sudo? –  favoretti Mar 26 '13 at 12:28
    
Also, to prevent respawn file removal, you can put && between commands, rather than ;, then second command will get executed only if first command returns 0, i.e. success. –  favoretti Mar 26 '13 at 12:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It must be sudo. cron can't input the password. Check mail for the user running the cron to confirm. Something like sudo: no tty present.

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both the user and root have /usr/bin/make as the PATH. The weird thing is that the above script doesn't work if I add it to either the root crontab or the user's. –  jads Mar 26 '13 at 12:51
    
ok then it must be sudo. cron can't input the password. Check mail for the user running the cron to confirm. Something like sudo: no tty present. –  suspectus Mar 26 '13 at 13:27
    
YES! Thanks suspectus, that was it! The exact error message you described was sat there for me to miss :) I'll mark this as answered. Many, many thanks for that. –  jads Mar 26 '13 at 14:42
    
Great - updating the answer for the record. –  suspectus Mar 26 '13 at 14:59

Try changing sudo /home/user/sb.sh;rm $Respawn to

/home/user/sb.sh;rm $Respawn

sudo is not necessary to run your command in this context, since it'll be invoked as root anyway.

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Thanks but it seems to make no difference (sudo is still required for the user to execute the script but even adding it to the user's crontab it still doesn't execute that part of the script) –  jads Mar 26 '13 at 12:52
    
is the above for the root users crontab or for another userscron tab? If it's for another user maybe add them to the sudoers with this line USERNAME ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD :/home/user/sb.sh –  ubuntu101010101 Mar 26 '13 at 13:21

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