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Now I try to connect to my socket cretaed by unicorn with this code

require 'socket'

def foo
  socket = UNIXSocket.new("path_to_socket/tmp/unicorn.sock")

  data = "GET /time HTTP/1.1\n" 
  data << "Connection: Close\n" 
  data << "User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0\n" 
  data << "Accept: */*\n" 
  data << "Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded\n" 
  data << "\n\r\n\r"

  socket.puts(data)

  while(line = socket.gets) do
    puts line
  end 
end

foo

But always get a "HTTP/1.1 400 Bad Request"

Please, can any body say what I'm do wrong???

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migrated from serverfault.com Mar 26 '13 at 12:34

This question came from our site for system and network administrators.

1  
Since others have pointed out alternatives that don't involve writing your own request, I'll try to summarize what's wrong with the request you've come up with. 1: Your headers are terminated by \n; they should actually be terminated by \r\n. 2: In a similar vein, you should be using \r\n\r\n, not \n\r\n\r, to terminate your request. 3: Every server I've ever thrown a hand-written HTTP request at required the Host header to be given, even those that don't actually give a rat's ass about its value - something along the lines of Host: localhost should work just fine in your case. – javawizard Mar 5 '15 at 8:04
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use net/http...

require "net/http"
require "socket"

sock = Net::BufferedIO.new(UNIXSocket.new("path_to_socket/tmp/unicorn.sock"))
request = Net::HTTP::Get.new("/time")
request.exec(sock, "1.1", "/time")

begin
  response = Net::HTTPResponse.read_new(sock)
end while response.kind_of?(Net::HTTPContinue)
response.reading_body(sock, request.response_body_permitted?) { }

response.body
response.code
share|improve this answer
    
Yes it works, thanks alot – Evgenii Mar 26 '13 at 7:21
    
Anyone getting 400 Bad Request when trying this: Note that all HTTP/1.1 requests MUST specify a Host: header as per RFC 2616. For HTTP/1.0 requests the only real option is to serve the "primary" host result. This question specifically addresses HTTP/1.1 protocol requests. From question 14705659 – Tyler Gannon Nov 28 '13 at 4:37
    
Also note that the HTTPGenericRequest#exec, while its access is public, it is marked as :nodoc: internal use only so it doesn't show up in API docs and might change over time. – Tyler Gannon Nov 28 '13 at 4:43

This is very helpful but please note that the Net::HTTP#exec method is marked for internal use only. Likely because it doesn't do resource management, etc.

The following work adapts the suggested strategy to override Net::HTTP#connect (to connect to a socket). I like to use the HTTParty gem for handling my HTTP requests. So the strategy here makes use of a custom ConnectionAdaptor for HTTParty. Now I can just change the ::default_params= call on my including class, to control whether we're using a Unix or a TCP/HTTP socket.

###########################################################
#  net/socket_http.rb
###########################################################

module Net
  #  Overrides the connect method to simply connect to a unix domain socket.
  class SocketHttp < HTTP
    attr_reader :socket_path

    #  URI should be a relative URI giving the path on the HTTP server.
    #  socket_path is the filesystem path to the socket the server is listening to.
    def initialize(uri, socket_path)
      @socket_path = socket_path
      super(uri)
    end

    #  Create the socket object.
    def connect
      @socket = Net::BufferedIO.new UNIXSocket.new socket_path
      on_connect
    end

    #  Override to prevent errors concatenating relative URI objects.
    def addr_port
      File.basename(socket_path)
    end
  end
end


###########################################################
#  sock_party.rb, a ConnectionAdapter class
###########################################################
require "net/http"
require "socket"

class SockParty < HTTParty::ConnectionAdapter
  #  Override the base class connection method.
  #  Only difference is that we'll create a Net::SocketHttp rather than a Net::HTTP.
  #  Relies on :socket_path in the
  def connection
    http = Net::SocketHttp.new(uri, options[:socket_path])

    if options[:timeout] && (options[:timeout].is_a?(Integer) || options[:timeout].is_a?(Float))
      http.open_timeout = options[:timeout]
      http.read_timeout = options[:timeout]
    end

    if options[:debug_output]
      http.set_debug_output(options[:debug_output])
    end

    if options[:ciphers]
      http.ciphers = options[:ciphers]
    end

    return http
  end
end


###########################################################
#  class MockSockParty, a really *nix-y HTTParty
###########################################################
class MockSockParty
  include HTTParty
  self.default_options = {connection_adapter: SockParty, socket_path: '/tmp/thin.sock'}

  def party_hard
    self.class.get('/client').body
  end
end

###########################################################
#  sock_party_spec.rb
###########################################################

require 'spec_helper'

describe SockParty do
  it "should party until its socks fall off." do
    puts MockSockParty.new.party_hard
  end
end
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