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Assume I am testing the following class:

class Processor
  def initialize(tree)
    @tree = tree
  end

  def process(entity)
    @tree.each_branch do |branch|
      branch.inject({}) do |result, fruit|
        result[fruit.name] = fruit.type == entity.type
      end
    end
  end
end

I'd like to inject a stubbed tree, in my spec I would have:

describe Processor do
  let(:tree) { double("tree") }
  let(:apple) { Fruit.new("apple") }
  let(:processor) { Processor.new(tree) }

  let(:fruit1) { Fruit.new("orange") }
  let(:fruit2) { Fruit.new("apple") }

  it "should process a fruit"
    tree.stub(:each_branch).and_yield([fruit1, fruit2])
    Processor.process(apple)
  end
end

I would expect the following hash to be created in the block. How do I verify that it is created correctly and returned to the caller of the block?

{ "orange" => false, "apple" => true }

EDIT: I omitted details of the Fruit class, it should be irrelevant.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you're ever having to try and catch the result somewhere in the middle of a method that your testing, it's normally a good sign that you need to refactor.

Here's an example: add a method to the branch, then test the branch class (assuming it's a class that you're in control of).

class Branch
  def unique_fruits
    inject({}) do |result, fruit|
      result[fruit.name] = fruit.type == entity.type
    end
  end
end

class Processor
  # snip ...
  def process(entity)
    @tree.each_branch do |branch|
      branch.unique_fruits
    end
  end
end

That's easier to test, as inject returns the hash. You can write a unit test for the branch class and isolate that method. Then in the Processor#process method you replace the inject block with a call to branch.unique_fruits.

If you don't have control over branch, just extract the block to another method on the Processor class:

class Processor
  # snip...

  def process(entity)
    @tree.each_branch do |branch|
      unique_fruits_on_branch(branch)
    end
  end

  def unique_fruits_on_branch(branch)
    branch.inject({}) do |result, fruit|
      result[fruit.name] = fruit.type == entity.type
    end
  end
end

However, you can probably see that it doesn't look as nice - the Processor class is working at different levels of abstraction. But both of these are easier to unit test.

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Thanks! I was leaning towards that solution, wasn't sure whether it was right because I like to test the class in its entirety and not internal methods. I'm not sure that, in my case, the first solution makes sense so I'll have to go for the second one. –  jabalsad Mar 26 '13 at 21:10

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