Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table defined with an integer_array field. It contains the following data:

 id | black_list 
----+------------
  4 |            
  5 |            
  8 |            
 12 |            
  6 |            
  7 |            
 10 | {5}        
 13 | {5}        
  3 | {}         
  9 | {3}        
 11 | {}         
 14 | {}         
  1 | {}         
  2 | {}         
 15 | {}         
 16 | {}         
 17 | {}         
(17 rows)

I need to write a query to see if the array field is empty - NULL or otherwise. The trouble is that the {} values are not null, nor do they return any length from the ARRAY_LENGTH function. None of the other array functions listed at http://www.postgresql.org/docs/8.4/static/functions-array.html seem to be what I need either. I've found that I can write ARRAY_LENGTH(0 || black_list) to get all of them to return a length of 1 or more, but that seems like a nasty hack. What's the proper way to test this?

Bonus question: What exactly is {} representative of? I've been unable to write a select statement that will return that value. ARRAY[] throws an error, ARRAY[""] returns {""}, ARRAY[NULL] returns {NULL}, etc.

share|improve this question

migrated from superuser.com Mar 26 '13 at 13:27

This question came from our site for computer enthusiasts and power users.

    
I realize that I could just write the inverse and test to see if the length is greater than 0, but I'd like to know why there doesn't seem to be a way to test it this way; –  Chrisbloom7 Mar 25 '13 at 20:31
    
{} seems to represent an empty array, which would explain both the value being NOT NULL and ARRAY_LENGTH({}) not returning anything -- though I'd expect it to return 0 on {}, perhaps that's a PostgreSQL peculiarity with which I'm unfamiliar. Is there a reason you can't just test the return value of ARRAY_LENGTH, as e.g. 'SELECT id FROM table WHERE ARRAY_LENGTH(black_list) IS NULL OR ARRAY_LENGTH(black_list) < 1'? Assuming ARRAY_LENGTH() doesn't lose its mind on empty values such as that for id=12 in the example above, it seems like that'd do the trick. –  Aaron Miller Mar 25 '13 at 20:36
    
(I don't have a Postgre server handy at the moment to test against, hence the untested query in my previous comment. Sorry if I've sent you down a blind alley.) –  Aaron Miller Mar 25 '13 at 20:36
    
Yeah, actually ARRAY_LENGTH(provider_black_list, 1) IS NULL works pretty well. Thanks for the suggestion. –  Chrisbloom7 Mar 25 '13 at 20:58
    
Sure thing! I'll make an answer out of it. –  Aaron Miller Mar 25 '13 at 21:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

{} seems to represent an empty array, which would explain both the value being NOT NULL and ARRAY_LENGTH({}) not returning anything – though I'd expect it to return 0 on {}, perhaps that's a PostgreSQL peculiarity with which I'm unfamiliar.

Is there a reason you can't just test the return value of ARRAY_LENGTH, as e.g.

SELECT id FROM table WHERE ARRAY_LENGTH(black_list, 1) IS NULL OR ARRAY_LENGTH(black_list, 1) < 1

Assuming ARRAY_LENGTH() doesn't lose its mind on empty values such as that for id=12 in the example above, it seems like that'd do the trick.

share|improve this answer
    
It works! Not at all how I'd expect to have to do so, put it simplified my previous query and reads well. –  Chrisbloom7 Mar 26 '13 at 13:24
    
BTW - ARRAY_LENGTH(black_list, 1) IS NULL tests correctly against both empty {} values as well as NULL values, so no need to test for < 1 in addition. –  Chrisbloom7 Mar 26 '13 at 13:26
    
I HAD to use 'IS NULL' like in the answer. When I tried '= NULL' it does not work. Strange but your method works :) –  itsols Oct 23 '13 at 7:24
    
@itsols That's because testing anything including NULL for equality against NULL returns NULL. Why this should be, I have no idea, but it's worth knowing nonetheless. –  Aaron Miller Oct 24 '13 at 15:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.