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Is there somewhere in the cosmos of scipy/numpy/... a standard method for Gauss-elimination of a matrix?

One finds many snippets via google, but I would prefer to use "trusted" modules if possible.

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Are you looking for Gaussian elimination especially, or any way of solving systems of linear equations/inverting matrices/...? –  larsmans Mar 26 '13 at 13:53
    
No I need gaussian elimination only. The reason for that is, I have systems of N equations with rank r<N and want to extract r equations from them, still including the full information. –  flonk Mar 26 '13 at 13:56
    
You could have a look here docs.sympy.org/dev/modules/solvers/solvers.html –  Mr E Mar 26 '13 at 14:09
    
Thanks Mr E, but I would like to avoid the conversion to symbolic objects if possible. It would be nice to have something explicitly for arrays (of floats), in the best case something which becomes exact for arrays of integers. –  flonk Mar 26 '13 at 14:14
    
My question is -- in my opinion -- precise and constructive. The best proof for that is that I have found an answer in the meantime. I would love to share it, if someone could reopen the question. –  flonk Mar 27 '13 at 9:16
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I finally found, that it can be done using LU decomposition. Here the U matrix represents the reduced form of the linear system.

from numpy import array
from scipy.linalg import lu

a = array([[2.,4.,4.,4.],[1.,2.,3.,3.],[1.,2.,2.,2.],[1.,4.,3.,4.]])

pl, u = lu(a, permute_l=True)

Then u reads

array([[ 2.,  4.,  4.,  4.],
       [ 0.,  2.,  1.,  2.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.]])

Depending on the solvability of the system this matrix has an upper triangular or trapezoidal structure. In the above case a line of zeros arises, as the matrix has only rank 3.

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see this example –  Mark Mikofski Apr 22 at 23:03
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