Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This function should give back the sum of all the numbers in the list but when I run it I always get back ans=0.

def sum(st: List[Int]): Int = {
  var ans=0 

  def combine(st: List[Int], ans:Int): Int = {
    if (st.isEmpty) ans else combine(st.tail, ans)        
  }
  ans
}

What is wrong with it?

share|improve this question
    
I know it's not what you're asking for, but just for the record, you can also call st.sum and get your result. –  Philippe Mar 26 '13 at 15:19

5 Answers 5

You need to add the head of the list to ans. At the moment you're recursing but not actually using the head of the list.

e.g. I think you need something like the below, in which you add the head of the list to the sum of the remainder.

scala> def sum(st: List[Int]): Int = 
     | {
     | if (st.isEmpty) {
     |    0
     | }
     | else {
     |    st.head + sum(st.tail)
     | }
     | }
sum: (st: List[Int])Int
share|improve this answer
4  
Also, it would probably help to call combine :) –  themel Mar 26 '13 at 14:16

1) You're not calling the inner method combine - you are just returning ans as it is iniatilized to 0.

2) combine doesn't really do anything

I think the code you wanted to write was the following:

def sum(st: List[Int]): Int = {
  def combine(st: List[Int], ans:Int): Int = {
    if (st.isEmpty) ans else combine(st.tail, ans + st.head)        
  }
  combine(st, 0)
}

but of course a shorter version would be:

st.foldLeft(0)(_ + _)

or just

st.sum

which uses a standard type class instance of Numeric: IntIsIntegral:

http://www.scala-lang.org/api/current/index.html#scala.math.Numeric$$IntIsIntegral$

share|improve this answer

You have defined a method combine inside your method sum, but you are not calling combine (other than within combine, so it never gets called). If you don't call the method, it will not be executed; just defining the method doesn't mean it's executed.

If you want to program in the functional style, you should also avoid using mutable variables (var); use immutable values (val) instead.

Also, your combine method is not summing anything (it's not modifying ans anywhere, or using any value in the list).

share|improve this answer

I agree with Brian answer on why your solution does not work.

Moreover, there is an even shorter way to do it with the API of Sequence of Scala (which List implements), using foldLeft :

def sum(st: List[Int]): Int = {
    st.foldLeft(0)(_ + _)
}
share|improve this answer

foldLeft, and even better, sum are the preferred option as hedefalk mentioned.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.