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I have a document A which contains n lines. I also have a sequence of n integers all of which are unique and <n. My goal is to create a document B which has the same contents as A, but with reordered lines, based on the given sequence.

Example:

A:

Foo
Bar
Bat

sequence: 2,0,1

Output (B):

Bat
Foo
Bar

Thanks in advance for the help

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1  
Shouldn't it be Bar, Bat, Foo or am I missing something? –  Taoufix Mar 26 '13 at 14:46
    
@axiom Actually I understood the problem like this: Foo should go to position 2, Bar to position 0 and Bat to position 1. I need more coffee :) –  Taoufix Mar 26 '13 at 15:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Another solution:

You can create a sequence file by doing (assuming sequence is comma delimited):

echo $sequence | sed s/,/\\n/g > seq.txt

Then, just do:

paste seq.txt A.txt | sort tmp2.txt | sed "s/^[0-9]*\s//"

Here's a bash function. The order can be delimited by anything.

Usage: schwartzianTransform "A.txt" 2 0 1

function schwartzianTransform {
    local file="$1"
    shift
    local sequence="$@"
    echo -n "$sequence" | sed 's/[^[:digit:]][^[:digit:]]*/\
/g' | paste -d ' ' - "$file" | sort -n | sed 's/^[[:digit:]]* //'
}
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3  
This is known, among other names, as a Schwartzian Transform. –  chepner Mar 26 '13 at 16:20
1  
This is the closest to what I wanted. Thanks. –  L3viathan Mar 26 '13 at 19:32

Read the file into an array and then use the power of indexing :

echo "Enter the input file name"
read ip

index=0

while read line ; do
        NAME[$index]="$line"
            index=$(($index+1))
            done < $ip

echo "Enter the file having order"
read od

while read line ; do
        echo "${NAME[$line]}";
            done < $od

[aman@aman sh]$ cat test 
Foo
Bar
Bat
[aman@aman sh]$ cat od
2
0
1
[aman@aman sh]$ ./order.sh 
Enter the input file name
test
Enter the file having order
od
Bat
Foo
Bar
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an awk oneliner could do the job:

 awk -vs="$s" '{d[NR-1]=$0}END{split(s,a,",");for(i=1;i<=length(a);i++)print d[a[i]]}'  file

$s is your sequence.

take a look this example:

kent$  seq 10 >file  #get a 10 lines file

kent$  s=$(seq 0 9 |shuf|tr '\n' ','|sed 's/,$//') # get a random sequence by shuf

kent$  echo $s     #check the sequence in var $s
7,9,1,0,5,4,3,8,6,2 

kent$  awk -vs="$s" '{d[NR-1]=$0}END{split(s,a,",");for(i=1;i<=length(a);i++)print d[a[i]]}'  file                                                                          
8
10
2
1
6
5
4
9
7
3
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One way(not an efficient one though for big files):

$ seq="2 0 1"
$ for i in $seq
> do
>   awk -v l="$i" 'NR==l+1' file
> done
Bat
Foo
Bar

If your file is a big one, you can use this one:

$ seq='2,0,1'
$ x=$(echo $seq | awk '{printf "%dp;", $0+1;print $0+1> "tn.txt"}' RS=,)
$ sed -n "$x" file | awk 'NR==FNR{a[++i]=$0;next}{print a[$0]}' - tn.txt

The 2nd line prepares a sed command print instruction, which is then used in the 3rd line with the sed command. This prints only the line numbers present in the sequence, but not in the order of the sequence. The awk command is used to order the sed result depending on the sequence.

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2  
first I would say, this works. but it will go through the file, the whole file n times, every time just print one line. If the file is big, it will be painful. I suggest OP starting this command before your lunch break. There is room to improve. –  Kent Mar 26 '13 at 15:07
    
@Kent I actually used a short python script now since I needed a solution instantly, I just thought that there gotta be a standard unix tool that was designed for this job. Apparently there isn't one. –  L3viathan Mar 26 '13 at 19:31

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