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I am trying to map a graph structure into the structure I show below.

Here is an example of the type of graph I need to map

enter image description here

where arrows always have a direction from left to right.

Here is the result I am looking for.

enter image description here

The goal is to generate an XML like this:

<root>
    <seq>
        <mod1/>
        <flow>
            <seq>
                <mod4/>
                <mod7/>
            </seq>
            <seq>
                <flow>
                    <seq>
                        <flow>
                            <mod4/>
                            <mod3/>
                        </flow>
                        <mod6/>
                    </seq>
                    <seq>
                        <flow>
                            <mod4/>
                            <mod3/>
                            <mod2/>
                        </flow>
                        <mod5/>
                    </seq>
                </flow>
                <mod8/>
            </seq>
        </flow>
    </seq>
</root>

Is there any algorithm I can use?

I don't think it's relevant but I am parsing JSON to write an XML with JAVA 7. Boxes are web services and the arrows represent input and output parameteres, so for instance, Module 5 is called once Modules 1,2,3 and 4 have finished and their outputs are its inputs.

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1  
This does not seem like a grid to me - it seems like a graph. However you will never be able to represent it as tree as it has cycles. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Mar 26 '13 at 15:19
    
Sorry, you are right @IvayloStrandjev, I just edited my question. –  eskalera Mar 26 '13 at 15:26
    
Please could you explain what you want to do in prose? –  Colonel Panic Mar 26 '13 at 15:30
    
@IvayloStrandjev In general you could represent it as a tree, but you need to detect the cyles and represent cycles with a terminal symbol (e.g. for just one loop 1 - TC (4 - 6 - 3 - 1) )it is then just totally ugly to read and need a lot of processing and cycle detection (to not doing endless loops, but find all loops. For algorithmic use you can create a directes acyclic graph. however a graph seems to fit better to the information. –  Offler Mar 26 '13 at 15:30
1  
This will no longer be this graph. What you mention resembles the cycle contraction part of the blossom algorithm for general matching but it will not solve the problem how to represent this graph as a tree. Truth is you can't because the definition of a tree. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Mar 26 '13 at 15:32

6 Answers 6

The graph you show above has cycles so it can never be represented as a tree. In general a tree is defined as a connected graph that has no cycles. So there is only one way to convert a general graph to a tree - remove the cycles and connect it if needed.

EDIT: as per your edit the graph is directed so you will have a DAG which again is not a tree but has several interesting properties.

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That's helpful @IvayloStrandjev, thanks again. –  eskalera Mar 26 '13 at 15:32

If the paths were directed, then there would be an equivalent tree structure formed by duplicating up leaf nodes to corrrespond to the multiple paths. If the structure does not have directed paths, then I believe that there is no corresponding tree structure in the general case.

EDIT

In the light of the new information that this is a directed graph, the equivalent tree structure is:

1
  2
    5
      8
  3
    5
      8
    6
      8
  4
    6
      8
    7

and the algorithm to derive this is an infix traversal of the graph, ceasing on each limb when there are no outgoing paths.

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1  
this can never be a tree. It has cycles. Best you can do is DAG –  Ivaylo Strandjev Mar 26 '13 at 15:20
    
Sorry, I just edited my question. Arrows are always directed from left to right. –  eskalera Mar 26 '13 at 15:29
    
Thanks @Chris, this starts to be more like it. I've been through this one too but I cant call the same module twice. Sorry for the confusion. Hope my new edit helps. –  eskalera Mar 26 '13 at 15:41
    
@ChrisWalton, can the traversal be used in the case where the tree converges again? –  eskalera Mar 27 '13 at 12:12
    
@eskalera - Only as shown above - with repeated leaf nodes. –  Chris Walton Mar 27 '13 at 12:44

(Not an answer, but my suggested edit got rejected for bogus reasons.)

Formal problem restatement, based on the comments for this question and the other one

The input is a partial orderX on a finite set X, specified by an acyclic directed graph with vertices X. The output is a series-parallel partial orderY on a finite set Y, specified by series and parallel composition of one-element partial orders, and a map f : Y → X, specified explicitly, such that, for every maximal chain x1 <X … <X xn (= a source-to-sink path in the transitive reduction of the input graph), there exists exactly one maximal chain y1 <Y … <Y yn with f(yj) = xj for all j ∈ {1, …, n}. We would like |Y| to be as small as possible.

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I had this carefully hyperlinked, but I can't scavenge that effort out of the page listing my edits. Sorry folks. Most of the terms here should be defined on Wikipedia. –  David Eisenstat Apr 15 '13 at 21:21

The problem still remains a bit unclear, however I'm getting the feeling that you need to perform graph serialization, or topological sort of the graph. This can only be applied to DAGs since the presence of cycles could be interpreted as a dependency cycle.

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Thanks @Orestis, I have edited the question. Could you take a look and see if it helps? –  eskalera Apr 3 '13 at 10:32

The picture you are showing suggests that the approach should be to work from the end backwards. You start by looking for the nodes that have no children - in this case, 8 and 7. The form the "dual trunk" of your tree. You then look for all the parents of 8 and 7. Also look for the module that has no parents - in this case 1. Call this the ancestor. It is the "end point". Finally, for each set of common nodes we declare a "family". Nodes with a common child are family - even if the same node can belong in more than one family. A node that has only one parent is part of that parent's family.

For 8, you find 5 and 6. Family A.

For 7, you find 4. Family B. 7 has only one parent, so we call 4 part of family B.

Call these "generation 2".

For generation 2, look for parents.

Family A: 5 -> 2,3,4 . Family C 6 -> 3,4 . Family D

Family B: 4 -> 1 - extended family reaches the ancestor. This path is now complete. We can capture one path as 1-4-7-end (all "family B")

Now look for the parents of Gen 3:

of 5 (Family C): 2 -> 1 3 -> 1 4 -> 1 Members of the same family with the same parent are 'close siblings' and get a <flow> above and below.

of 6 (Family D): 3 -> 1 4 -> 1 Another close family

And since these families all ended up pointing to the ancestor, we'll need another there.

Thus we have the full ancestry of every process described. Now we convert to your flow map, using the above "families".

Your desired XML - annotated with the families. You can see how this works

<root>
    <seq>
        <mod1/> // the ancestor
        <flow>
            <seq> // family B - straight through.
                <mod4/>
                <mod7/>
            </seq>
            <seq> 
                <flow>
                    <seq>
                        <flow> // close family D
                            <mod4/>
                            <mod3/>
                        </flow>
                        <mod6/> // child of D
                    </seq>
                    <seq>
                        <flow> // close family C
                            <mod4/>
                            <mod3/>
                            <mod2/>
                        </flow>
                        <mod5/> // child of C
                    </seq>
                </flow>
                <mod8/>
            </seq>
        </flow>
    </seq>
</root>

Does this help, or am I completely off the mark?

EDIT: on the subject of "closing flows in the middle", the following thought:

If a family has the same (grand)child as another family, and they have the same (grand)parent, then their flows can be combined at that level. To discover this, you need to keep a list of "direct lineage" with each family, and you need to search this list iteratively for every family to find cases where there are both common (grand)parents and common (grand)children. Working through this in a general way will take a bit more effort than I can put into this tonight, and since you had indicated you are close to a solution I will leave it here...

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Thanks @Floris, this is been the best attempt so far, but you are assuming there is only one "ancestor", which is not necessarily true. Besides, nodes could be merged in the middle of the tree, if parents of six were 4,3,and also 2, for instance, 5 and 6 would be merged. You can find more info in this thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/15929135/… –  eskalera Apr 17 '13 at 8:05
    
Sorry for the confusion. I know I haven't explained the problem formally, which I am having trouble to do. I've almost finished the solution and I'll post it as soon as I have it. –  eskalera Apr 17 '13 at 8:07
    
I was wondering if you have ever studied LabView - a graphical language that represents data with "wires". The way you write, and code executes, follows exactly the paradigm you are describing. Maybe you can get some inspiration from looking at ni.com/labview/whatis/graphical-programming –  Floris Apr 17 '13 at 10:38
    
If there is more than one ancestor, you can create a virtual "matriarch" who is the parent of all ancestors, but who doesn't get rendered in the graph. I look forward to seeing your solution when it's done. –  Floris Apr 17 '13 at 11:22
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Finally, I found an algorithm that did the job. Here it is for all of you who tried to help me out:

First of all I built an inverted spanning tree from the DAG in sketch 1. So I started from modules 7 and 8, building the tree backwards and where modules are duplicated.

After that I create virtual nodes called FLOW and SEQUENCE and introduce them in the tree so that every MODULE node is a child of a SEQUENCE node. Spanning branches are SEQUENCE nodes which are childs of FLOW nodes. I think this is step is intuitive enough but the important idea is to understand that we need virtual nodes so we can close the FLOW nodes, which are the ones splitting from one node to more than one.

After that I go over the tree depth first, and for every module(we'll call it the driver) I compare its children with the children of the driver's siblings. If they don't match I keep going down with the grandchildren of the driver's siblings, so that, all branches coming out of the driver's siblings must pass through the same nodes as the driver does. Graphically this means that at some point, both nodes need the exact same modules.

If they match I clean the merging branches from the coinciding nodes downwards, which means I cut them off their parents. From there upwards it goes into a new SEQUENCE node together with the drivers SEQUENCE node, into the same FLOW node.

After going over the whole tree, as long as a merge has been made, we go over the tree again, this time with a greater relationship. This means that instead of comparing the driver's children, we compare the driver's great children.

The last step is obviously to revert the tree again.

There are some concepts I have left aside because of the intricacies the programming of these virtual nodes imply. Mainly due to all the parent-children-sibling relationship being lost once virtual nodes have been introduced. But I hope the general idea has been understood.

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