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This is the scenario we have: We have huge encrypted files, in the order of gigabytes that we can decrypt correctly if we read them until the end. The problem arises when we are reading and detect some flag in the file, then we stop reading and call reader.Close(), what happens is that a CryptographicException: "Padding is invalid and cannot be removed." is thrown. I have this small console app that reproduce this behavior, to test it just run it, it will create a file in your C:\ drive and then it will read line by line when pressing any key, and will stop when pressing 'q'.

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Security.Cryptography;

namespace encryptSample
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var transform = CreateCryptoTransform(true);
            // first create encrypted file
            using (FileStream destination = new FileStream("c:\\test_enc.txt", FileMode.OpenOrCreate, FileAccess.Write, FileShare.ReadWrite))
            {
                using (CryptoStream cryptoStream = new CryptoStream(destination, transform, CryptoStreamMode.Write))
                {
                    using (StreamWriter source = new StreamWriter(cryptoStream))
                    {
                        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
                        {
                            source.WriteLine("This is just random text to fill the file and show what happens when I stop reading in the middle - " + i);
                        }
                        // Also tried this line, but is the same with or without it
                        cryptoStream.FlushFinalBlock();
                    }
                }
            }

            StreamReader reader;
            ICryptoTransform transformDec;
            CryptoStream cryptoStreamReader;

            transformDec = CreateCryptoTransform(false);
            FileStream fileStream = new FileStream("c:\\test_enc.txt", FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.ReadWrite);
            cryptoStreamReader = new CryptoStream(fileStream, transformDec, CryptoStreamMode.Read);
            reader = new StreamReader(cryptoStreamReader);

            while (Console.In.ReadLine() != "q")
            {
                Console.WriteLine(reader.ReadLine());
            }

            try
            {
                cryptoStreamReader.Close();
                reader.Close();
                reader.Dispose();
            }
            catch (CryptographicException ex)
            {
                if (reader.EndOfStream)
                    throw;

            }
        }

        private static ICryptoTransform CreateCryptoTransform(bool encrypt)
        {
            byte[] salt = new byte[] { 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00 }; // Must be at least eight bytes.  MAKE THIS SALTIER!
            const int iterations = 1042; // Recommendation is >= 1000.
            const string password = "123456";

            AesManaged aes = new AesManaged();
            aes.BlockSize = aes.LegalBlockSizes[0].MaxSize;
            aes.KeySize = aes.LegalKeySizes[0].MaxSize;
            // NB: Rfc2898DeriveBytes initialization and subsequent calls to   GetBytes   must be eactly the same, including order, on both the encryption and decryption sides.
            Rfc2898DeriveBytes key = new Rfc2898DeriveBytes(password, salt, iterations);
            aes.Key = key.GetBytes(aes.KeySize / 8);
            aes.IV = key.GetBytes(aes.BlockSize / 8);
            aes.Mode = CipherMode.CBC;
            aes.Padding = PaddingMode.PKCS7;
            ICryptoTransform transform = encrypt ? aes.CreateEncryptor(aes.Key, aes.IV) : aes.CreateDecryptor(aes.Key, aes.IV);
            return transform;
        }

    }
}

In our original class, we do the reader.Close during the Dispose(). My question is, is it valid to check if reader.EndOfStream is false and then capture the CryptographicException? Or there is something wrong in the encryption/decryption methods? Maybe we are missing something.

Regards!

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By the way, were you able to solve this? –  Panda Pajama Feb 27 at 9:01
    
We "solved" by checking for some status that tell us if the user aborted reading and also by checking the .EndOfStream. We didn't care if it is an undefined behavior; it was causing the problem only when the system detected certain flags and we have to stop reading on purpose. As you said, it's an undocumented behavior, but one of many on the Cryptography libs so we deal with it the best we can and if a fix is made in a future version, we'll have to change our code again :S. –  emmanuel Mar 6 at 14:20
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4 Answers

As I understand it, the exception is thrown when the last byte read is not a valid padding byte. When you intentionally close the stream early, the last byte read will most likely be considered "invalid padding" and the exception is thrown. Since you're ending intentionally, you should be safe ignoring the exception.

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Can you turn off padding?

// aes.Padding = PaddingMode.PKCS7;
aes.Padding = PaddingMode.None;
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I tried turning padding off, but if I do so, AES encryption will fail. As I understand AES needs the padding. –  emmanuel Mar 26 '13 at 16:35
    
@emmanuel - It makes your test program run correctly without exceptions. –  Steve Wellens Mar 26 '13 at 18:56
    
You are right, but when I check the output there is garbage on it :S, try replacing the while and write to a file: File.WriteAllText("c:\\test_decrypted", reader.ReadToEnd());. If I comment the line cryptoStream.FlushFinalBlock(); the error I get is the exception I mentioned before when closing before EOF. –  emmanuel Mar 26 '13 at 20:37
    
I tried it and got some corruption at the end of the file. I removed cryptoStream.FlushFinalBlock() and with padding set to none, it worked with no exceptions and no corruption. –  Steve Wellens Mar 26 '13 at 20:56
    
This is really weird, if I do that, I get this exception: "Length of the data to encrypt is invalid." when encrypting so the file is not generated :S. –  emmanuel Mar 27 '13 at 14:05
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Close calls Dispose(true) which calls FlushFinalBlock which throws the exception, because this is not really the final block.

You can prevent this by overriding the Close method so that it doesn't call FlushFinalBlock:

public class SilentCryptoStream : CryptoStream {
    public SilentCryptoStream(Stream stream, ICryptoTransform transform, CryptoStreamMode mode) :
        base(stream, transform, mode) {
    }

    public override void Close() {
        this.Dispose(false);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }
}

(You also need to manually close the underlying stream.)

is it valid to check if reader.EndOfStream is false and then capture the CryptographicException

I think it's OK.

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I'm not so sure capturing the exception is okay. Most likely nobody will be affected, but the point of Dispose is to release unmanaged resources. So unless the exception is thrown on the very last step after everything else has been released, it is likely that capturing it and ignoring it will lead to a resource or memory leak. Also, how do you know Dispose(false) will behave exactly as you say? –  Panda Pajama Feb 13 at 1:19
    
>"it is likely that capturing it and ignoring it will lead to a resource or memory leak" No. The CryptoStream is clever and wraps FlushFinalBlock and the base stream closing in a try block while other cleanup code is in the finally block. Also, CryptoStream doesn't own any unmanaged resources. It has nothing to leak. –  Ark-kun Feb 14 at 2:48
    
>"Also, how do you know Dispose(false) will behave exactly as you say?" I've looked at the source code. The boolean disposing parameter only enables calling the FlushFinalBlock (if not yet flushed) and the base stream closing. –  Ark-kun Feb 14 at 3:06
    
I checked the assembly with DotPeek, and calling Dispose(false) won't close the underlying stream. This is different from what you found, so it is likely that it varies according to implementation. Catching the exception is something I'd like to avoid, as the CryptoStream is one of many layered streams, and used in many places. I guess I could derive a new class and catch the exception there, but I'd rather prevent the exception going off in the first place. –  Panda Pajama Feb 15 at 16:13
    
>"calling Dispose(false) won't close the underlying stream." Yes. I've specifically wrote about that since the beginning. "This is different from what you found" No, this is the same. Re-read my answer - (You also need to manually close the underlying stream.) and my comment - The boolean disposing parameter only enables calling the FlushFinalBlock (if not yet flushed) and the base stream closing. –  Ark-kun Feb 16 at 6:39
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This exception is thrown during Dispose(true). Throwing from Dispose is already a design flaw (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb386039.aspx), but it's even worse since this exception is thrown even before the underlying stream is closed.

This means that anything that receives a Stream that might be a CryptoStream needs to work around this and either close the underlying Stream themselves in a 'catch' block (essentially needing a reference to something completely unrelated), or somehow warn all listeners that the stream may still be open (e.g., "don't try to delete the underlying file -- it's still open!").

No, in my book, this is a pretty big oversight, and the other answers don't seem to address the fundamental issue. CryptoStream takes ownership of the passed-in stream, so it takes on the responsibility to close the underlying stream before control leaves Dispose(true), end of story.

Ideally, it should also never throw under circumstances that are not truly exceptional (such as "we stopped reading early, because the decrypted data is in the wrong format and it's a waste of time to continue reading").

Our solution was basically this:

internal sealed class SilentCryptoStream : CryptoStream
{
    private readonly Stream underlyingStream;

    public SilentCryptoStream(Stream stream, ICryptoTransform transform, CryptoStreamMode mode)
        : base(stream, transform, mode)
    {
        // stream is already implicitly validated non-null in the base constructor.
        this.underlyingStream = stream;
    }

    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        try
        {
            base.Dispose(disposing);
        }
        catch (CryptographicException)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                this.underlyingStream.Dispose();
            }
        }
    }
}
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