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I'm trying to use mod_rewrite to make .img serve either a png or jpg file depending on what's available with the given filename (without an external redirect).

Here's what I'm trying:

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !.*\.img [OR]
RewriteCond /var/www/html%{REQUEST_URI} -f
RewriteRule ^ - [S=3]

RewriteRule ^/?(.*)\.img$ /$1

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME}.png -f
RewriteRule ^ $0.png [S=1,T=image/png]

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME}.jpg -f
RewriteRule ^ $0.jpg [T=image/jpeg]

The first bit seems to work fine (it redirects .img files to have no extension), but the later checks never run. I'm pretty unclear on how mod_rewrite actually works, but I think this is because the request gets restarted with the rename, and because it no-longer has a .img extension, the first rule kicks in and prevents the others running. But I have no idea how to avoid this.

Any help is appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could try this instead:

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} /(.*)\.img$
RewriteCond /%1.png -f
RewriteRule ^ /%1.png

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} /(.*)\.img$
RewriteCond /%1.jpg -f
RewriteRule ^ /%1.jpg

If this works then it would require only one rewrite per request.

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Yes, that's much better! I had to change the second conditions to include the root /var/www/html path (I'm using a virtual server, and it turns out REQUEST_FILENAME isn't the filename in that case), so I also changed it to REQUEST_URI to stay robust. And I added the mime types back in ([T=image/png], [T=image/jpeg]) –  Dave Mar 26 '13 at 23:16
    
Sorry, Dave, I've just realised I had a /var/www/html prefix to the path in both RewriteRule directives when it was incorrect. I've edited my answer to remove those prefixes. –  Arkanon Mar 27 '13 at 19:58
    
That's only correct when not using virtual servers; as I said in my comment, it behaves differently with virtual servers, and needs the root path everywhere. –  Dave Mar 28 '13 at 19:34

I figured it out. My original code was pretty close; here's the fixed version:

Update: Here's a version that displays 404 errors correctly (the version below will redirect mysite.com/mydirectory.img to the directory, which is odd behaviour)

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !.*\.img [OR]
RewriteCond /var/www/html%{REQUEST_URI} -f
RewriteRule ^ - [S=4]

RewriteRule ^/?(.*)\.img$ /$1

RewriteCond /var/www/html%{REQUEST_FILENAME}.png -f
RewriteRule ^ /var/www/html%{REQUEST_FILENAME}.png [L,S=2,T=image/png]

RewriteCond /var/www/html%{REQUEST_FILENAME}.jpg -f
RewriteRule ^ /var/www/html%{REQUEST_FILENAME}.jpg [L,S=1,T=image/jpeg]

RewriteRule ^ - [R=404]

Original solution (no 404 checking):

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !.*\.img [OR]
RewriteCond /var/www/html%{REQUEST_URI} -f
RewriteRule ^ - [S=3]

RewriteRule ^/?(.*)\.img$ /$1

RewriteCond /var/www/html%{REQUEST_FILENAME}.png -f
RewriteRule ^ /var/www/html%{REQUEST_FILENAME}.png [S=1,T=image/png]

RewriteCond /var/www/html%{REQUEST_FILENAME}.jpg -f
RewriteRule ^ /var/www/html%{REQUEST_FILENAME}.jpg [T=image/jpeg]

The things to notice are:

  • I added the root folder to the file checks; it seems that ${REQUEST_FILENAME} begins simply set to %{REQUEST_URI}, and while the first rewrite doesn't change %{REQUEST_URI}, it does change ${REQUEST_FILENAME}, but leaves it in URI form.
  • I changed $0 to %{REQUEST_FILENAME}. I'm not sure what $0 was set to (maybe an empty string with the ^ regex), but it caused a 403 Forbidden error until I changed it.

In case it helps anybody else, I debugged that with this line:

RewriteRule ^ /debug?u=%{REQUEST_URI}&f=%{REQUEST_FILENAME} [R]

which sends the variables to the browser in the form of a query string.

So it works. I still have no idea how mod_rewrite decides which rules get run at what time and with what input, despite writing lots of these things and reading most of the documentation…

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