Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to create a module that will watch for folder. I write some of code:

import os, pyinotify

class FileWatcher:
    def start_watch(self, dir):
        wm = pyinotify.WatchManager()
        self.notifier = pyinotify.Notifier(wm, EventProcessor())
        mask = pyinotify.IN_CREATE | pyinotify.IN_MODIFY | pyinotify.IN_DELETE | pyinotify.IN_DELETE_SELF | pyinotify.IN_MOVED_FROM | pyinotify.IN_MOVED_TO
        wdd = wm.add_watch(dir, mask, rec=True)
        while True:
            self.notifier.process_events()
            if self.notifier.check_events():
                self.notifier.read_events()

    def stop_watch(self):
        self.notifier.stop()
        print ('\nWatcher stopped')

class EventProcessor(pyinotify.ProcessEvent):
    def process_IN_CREATE(self, event):
        print('in CREATE')

    def process_IN_MODIFY(self, event):
        print('in MODIFY')

    def process_IN_DELETE(self, event):
        print('in delete')

    def process_IN_DELETE_SELF(self, event):
        print('in delete self')

    def process_IN_MOVED_FROM(self, event):
        print('in MOVED_FROM')

    def process_IN_MOVED_TO(self, event):
        print('in IN_MOVED_TO')

if __name__ == "__main__":
    watcher = FileWatcher()
    try:
        folder = "/home/user/Desktop/PythonFS"
        watcher.start_watch(folder)
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        watcher.stop_watch()    

When i modified a file and then removed it the methods process_IN_MODIFY and process_IN_DELETE was never called. How cat i solve it?

But when i create a file the method process_IN_CREATE() was called.

OS is Linux mint 13.

UPD: New Code

share|improve this question
1  
Umm, this code isn't syntactically valid (indentation is missing, just paste it, select it, and press Ctrl+K), and it only defines classes and functions, and does not call any of them. –  phihag Mar 26 '13 at 16:41
    
It's syntatically vallid code.. Methods should called from notifier, because i put Instance of EventProcessor to constructor of pyinotify.Notifier(...) –  Vetal.lebed Mar 26 '13 at 16:47
    
No it's not. And why there are some callable functions in there, the code doesn't actually call them. –  phihag Mar 26 '13 at 16:50
    
oh sorry. Parser of code works bad. And ctrl+k doesn't help to me. I changed this line. –  Vetal.lebed Mar 26 '13 at 16:54
    
stop_watch and start_watch called from another module.It simple start and stop. I think they are not touching my problem. –  Vetal.lebed Mar 26 '13 at 16:59
show 2 more comments

1 Answer

Try the following code. It is basically the same as your code; I've only added

f = FileWatcher()
f.start_watch('/tmp/test', None)

at the end to start a FileWatcher. Make sure the directory /tmp/test exists, or else change that line to point to an existent directory.

If a file foo exists in /tmp/test, and if I modify this file, the above program prints

in create   # after modification
in modify   # after saving
in modify
in delete

Now if I delete the file, the program prints:

in delete

import os
import pyinotify


class FileWatcher:
    notifier = None

    def start_watch(self, dir, callback):
        wm = pyinotify.WatchManager()
        self.notifier = pyinotify.Notifier(wm, EventProcessor(callback))
        mask = (pyinotify.IN_CREATE | pyinotify.IN_MODIFY | pyinotify.IN_DELETE
                | pyinotify.IN_DELETE_SELF | pyinotify.IN_MOVED_FROM
                | pyinotify.IN_MOVED_TO)
        wdd = wm.add_watch(dir, mask, rec=True)
        while True:
            self.notifier.process_events()
            if self.notifier.check_events():
                self.notifier.read_events()


class EventProcessor(pyinotify.ProcessEvent):
    def __init__(self, callback):
        self.event_callback = callback

    def process_IN_CREATE(self, event):
        # if self.event_callback is not None:
        # self.event_callback.on_file_created(os.path.join(event.path,
        # event.name))
        print('in create')

    def process_IN_MODIFY(self, event):
        # if self.event_callback is not None:
        # self.event_callback.on_file_modifed(os.path.join(event.path,
        # event.name))
        print('in modify')

    def process_IN_DELETE(self, event):
        print('in delete')

    def process_IN_DELETE_SELF(self, event):
        print('in delete self')

    def process_IN_MOVED_FROM(self, event):
        print('in moved_from')

    def process_IN_MOVED_TO(self, event):
        print('in moved to')


f = FileWatcher()
f.start_watch('/tmp/test', None)

By the way, once you call f.start_watch, the process falls into a while True loop from which it can not escape. Even calling f.stop_watch from another thread will not somehow break you out of this while loop.

If you do plan on using threading, you may need to pass a threading.Event to start_watch, and check its state inside the while-loop to determine when to break out of the loop.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.