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I think this is a simple question but I have been staring at some complicated legacy code and I can’t see the trees for the forest anymore. This applications will run for days and then fail when it exits (of course it won’t faill for shorter jobs!) I suspect a SEGV.

I’ve simplified the case with some pseudo-code below (hopefully I’ve got it right).

In human terms: I have a class XYZ which has lots of stuff including a vector of pointers to a simple class ABC (let’s assume it is simple). Those pointers are deleted in the destructor of XYZ; that is all the destructor does.

Then I have a simple base class TheBase which just has two simple virtual methods, no destructor.

Finally I have three classes, Tom and Dick (derived from TheBase) and Harry (not derived from TheBase.) All three of them are constructed from a const reference to an XYZ object; so they have a const reference to the XYZ object. They also have no destructor.

In the main, boost::shared_ptr’s are defined for one each of a Tom, Dick and Harry object. Then an XYZ object is created. Next that XYZ object is passed as a const reference to the Tom, Dick and Harry objects. After that, a whole bunch of stuff happens and main exits.

So what happens when all of these things go out of scope? Particularly the XYZ object? Will this be handled correctly? Seems like something will be deleted more than once.

// A simple class (let's assume it is!)
class ABC
{
  // unimportant stuff.
}

// class XYZ has an array of ABC objects. All the destructor does is delete     those objects.
class XZY 
{
  public:
    XYZ(vector<string> v1,
        vector<string> v2,
        vector<string> v3 );
  virtual ~XYZ(){
          for ( i = 0; i < n, i++ ){
              delete my_abcs[i];
          }
  } 
private:
    vector <ABC*> my_abcs
  // lots of other methods & members
}

// Simple base class with only 2 simple virtual methods
class TheBase
{   
  public:
        virtual void minor_func1();
        virtual void minor_func2();
}

// A class derived from base class. Constructs with a const reference to an XYZ class.
class Tom:TheBase
{
    public:
        Tom( const XYZ & xyz )

    private:
        const XYZ & my_xyz; 
  // lots of other methods & members
}
Tom::Tom(const XYZ & xyz):my_xyz(xyz){
  ...
}

// Another class derived from base class. Constructs with a const reference to an XYZ class.
class Dick:TheBase
{
    public:
        Dick( const XYZ & xyz )

    private:
        const XYZ & my_xyz; 
    // lots of other methods & members
}
Dick::Dick(const XYZ & xyz):my_xyz(xyz){
...
}

// A class NOT derived from base class but still constructs with a const reference to an XYZ class.
class Harry:TheBase
{
  public:
        Harry( const XYZ & xyz )

    private:
        const XYZ & my_xyz; 
    // lots of other methods & members
}
Harry::Harry(const XYZ & xyz):my_xyz(xyz){
...
}

main (...){
  ...

  boost::shared_ptr <Tom> a_tom;
  boost::shared_ptr <Dick> a_dick;
  boost::shared_ptr <Harry> a_harry;
  ...

  XYZ a_xyz( ... );

  a_tom.reset( new Tom( a_xyz) );
  a_dick.reset( new Dick( a_xyz) );
  a_harry.reset( new harry( a_xyz) );

  ...
}
share|improve this question
    
@Polar You mean vector<ABC>, rather than vector<ABC*>. If ABC is a simple object with value semantics, which supports copy, that's certainly a better solution. –  James Kanze Mar 26 '13 at 17:35
    
Also, the destructor of TheBase should probably be virtual. (In the code given, its not necessary, but in general, if the base class has virtual functions, it seems reasonable to expect someone to try to delete a derived object through a pointer to the base.) –  James Kanze Mar 26 '13 at 17:36
    
@JamesKanze Ah, thanks - I didn't read the pointer in there. Still, I thought vector was designed to handle pointers... Also, it's good practice to always use a virtual destructor, just in case. –  Polar Mar 26 '13 at 17:36
    
@Polar Not always. Not even always for classes designed for inheritance. I would be very unhappy if std::complex<double> had a virtual destructor, or std::iterator. –  James Kanze Mar 26 '13 at 17:41
    
@JamesKanze What situations would you use it in. Admittedly, I'm only advocating for his code to contain virtual destructors, but I can't really think of a situation where you wouldn't. Also, this comment chain is getting a bit long :P –  Polar Mar 26 '13 at 17:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have a class XYZ which has lots of stuff including a vector of pointers to a simple class ABC (let’s assume it is simple). Those pointers are deleted in the destructor of XYZ; that is all the destructor does.

As an aside, the answer to this problem is std::vector<std::unique_ptr<ABC>>, which encapsulates the fact that the std::vector owns the pointers in question in the type, and removes the need for you to manually destroy them. It will also block accidental copies: if you ever implement a non-trivial destructor, you need to implement or block copy construction and copy assignment (the rule of 3).

With a std::vector<std::unique_ptr<ABC>>, it can only be moved, so move assignment and move construct are unblocked, while copy construct and copy assignment are blocked.

std::unique_ptr<T> has a tiny amount of overhead.

The only cost is a bunch of calls to .get() when you need to access the underlying T*, which has basically zero run-time cost.

In the main, boost::shared_ptr’s are defined for one each of a Tom, Dick and Harry object. Then an XYZ object is created. Next that XYZ object is passed as a const reference to the Tom, Dick and Harry objects. After that, a whole bunch of stuff happens and main exits.

Objects in C++ in the same scope are destroyed in the reverse order that they are declared. So the Tom, Dick and Harry lifetime will be longer than the XYZ object.

Finally I have three classes, Tom and Dick (derived from TheBase) and Harry (not derived from TheBase.) All three of them are constructed from a const reference to an XYZ object; so they have a const reference to the XYZ object. They also have no destructor.

References (in this context) have no impact on the lifetime of the thing referred. References are not smart pointers, they are unsafe and unchecked aliases. In general, when you create a reference to something, it is your job to ensure that the object lasts longer than the reference to the object.

If after XYZ goes out of scope any of Tom, Dick or Harry access their reference-to-XYZ, then you have invoked undefined behavior. If you don't you haven't.

Even if you haven't, it can be a bad habit to rely on this, because your code will be exceedingly fragile.

(To be clear: when I said "in this context", I meant it. There is a context in which a reference lifetime changes the lifetime of the object in question: when the reference is constructed directly from a temporary (anonymous) object, the lifetime of that anonymous object will be extended to the lifetime of the reference. Note, however, the references that are indirectly constructed this way do not have this property -- so A& a = A(); will extend the lifetime of the anonymous A, while B& b = a; will not, and A& get_A() { return A(); }; A& a = get_A(); does not work, but A get_A() { return A(); }; A& a = get_A(); does result in a lifetime extension (not certain on this last one).)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks all. I realize I may have confused the issue with my elaboration of the vector of pointers in XYZ; I mainly wanted to underscore the fact that XYZ is not simple (to say the least!) and does some odd things with memory. (Still the info on unique_ptr is handy to have.) I was really interested in what happens to the XYZ object. I was pretty sure what is being done isn’t quite good practice but wasn’t completely sure of what the implications are. I guess it isn’t my main problem but still needs to be cleaned up. –  user1074069 Mar 26 '13 at 18:32

Objects managed by a shared_ptr will be destructed when the last shared_ptr pointing to them is destructed. Local variables are destructed when they go out of scope, in the reverse order that they are created. In your case, if there are no shared_ptr with static lifetime (or pseudo static lifetime; i.e. in a dynamically allocated object which will not be destructed until after leaving main, if at all), then a_xyz will be destructed, then the three objects pointed to by the shared_ptr. If these objects do not use the reference to a_xyz in their destructors (and the shared_ptr haven't been copied to somewhere where they will outlive main), then there should be no problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Concise answer! Thanks. –  user1074069 Mar 26 '13 at 18:34

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