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I am trying to benchmark many (about 25) variations of an algorithm written in C++.

I implemented these variations using a combination of three methods:

  1. copying code and making minor changes to the copied version

  2. subclassing the base algorithm class

  3. using #ifdefs to switch between snippets of code

The variations that arise from options 1 and 2 are okay because I can select which variation of the algorithm to run in a configuration file. I can then iterate through different configuration files and keep a record of "configuration:results" pairs - keeping these records is very important to my work.

I am currently having a problem with the #ifdefs because I have to compile multiple versions of the code to access these variations, making it much harder to run automated experiment scripts and to keep accurate records of results. The #ifdefs, however, are very useful because if I find a mistake in one copy of the code, then I do not have to remember to correct this mistake in multiple copies.

The #ifdefs expand six variations that I created by both copying code and subclassing into 24 total variations (4 variations for each basic variation).

Here is an example - mostly the I am using the #ifdefs to avoid replicating too much code:

    ....

    double lasso_gam=*gamma;
    *lasso_idx=-1;
    for(int aj=0;aj<(int)a_idx.size();aj++){
        int j=a_idx[aj];
        assert(j<=C*L);
        double inc=wa[aj]*(*gamma)*signs[aj];
        if( (beta_sp(j)>0 && beta_sp(j)+inc<0)
#ifdef ALLOW_NEG_LARS
            || (beta_sp(j)<0 && beta_sp(j)+inc>0)
#else
            || (beta_sp(j)==0 && beta_sp(j)+inc<0)
#endif
            ){
            double tmp_gam=-beta_sp(j)/wa[aj]*signs[aj];

            if(tmp_gam>=0 && tmp_gam<lasso_gam) {
                *lasso_idx=aj;
                *next_active=j;
                lasso_gam=tmp_gam;
            }
        }
    }

    if(lasso_idx>=0){
        *gamma=lasso_gam;
    }

    ....

Question: What is the best way to allow the multiple variations of the algorithm, which are currently specified by #ifdefs, to be run given a configuration file that specifies which variation of the algorithm to run.

Ideally I would like to compile the code only once and select an algorithm variation at runtime using the config file.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If your #ifs are scattered all around and change a line of code here or there then turn all your #ifs into ifs based on an enum passed into the function for which variation to run and hope the compiler does a great job at optimizing. Hopefully it will generate almost the same code as having defined the function multiple times except with a single run time condition to decide which to run. No promises.

If you are #ifing a block of code in the algorithm split the algorithm up into smaller functions that your different implementations of the whole algorithm can call. This is obviously impractical if your #ifs were so intrusive that you would wind up with 50 functions though.

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I am currently thinking about doing. The ifs would be in an innermost loop, so I was worried about the performance hit. I guess the optimization level would make a difference, though. – user1149913 Mar 26 '13 at 18:46

You can augment your algorithm with a (possibly additional) template argument like this:

enum class algorithm_type
{
    type_a,
    type_b,
    type_c
};

template <algorithm_type AlgorithmType>
void foo(int usual, double args)
{
    std::cout << "common code" << std::endl;

    if (AlgorithmType == algorithm_type::type_a)
    {
        std::cout << "doing type a..." << usual << ", " << args << std::endl;
    }
    else if (AlgorithmType == algorithm_type::type_b)
    {
        std::cout << "doing type b..." << usual << ", " << args << std::endl;
    }
    else if (AlgorithmType == algorithm_type::type_c)
    {
        std::cout << "doing type c..." << usual << ", " << args << std::endl;
    }

    std::cout << "more common code" << std::endl;
}

Now you can select your behavior via this template argument:

foo<algorithm_type::type_a>(11, 0.1605);
foo<algorithm_type::type_b>(11, 0.1605);
foo<algorithm_type::type_c>(11, 0.1605);

The type, being a constant expression, yields a compile-time decided branch (that is, the others are known to be dead code and removed). In fact, your compiler should warn you about this (how you deal with that is up to you).

But you can still dispatch off a runtime value just fine:

#include <stdexcept>

void foo_with_runtime_switch(algorithm_type algorithmType,
                             int usual, double args)
{
    switch (algorithmType)
    {
    case algorithm_type::type_a:
        return foo<algorithm_type::type_a>(usual, args);
    case algorithm_type::type_b:
        return foo<algorithm_type::type_b>(usual, args);
    case algorithm_type::type_c:
        return foo<algorithm_type::type_c>(usual, args);
    default:
        throw std::runtime_error("wat");
    }
}

foo_with_runtime_switch(algorithm_type::type_a, 11, 0.1605);
foo_with_runtime_switch(algorithm_type::type_b, 11, 0.1605);
foo_with_runtime_switch(algorithm_type::type_c, 11, 0.1605);

The internals of the algorithm remain the same (dead branches eliminated, same optimizations), just how you get there has changed. (Note that it's possible to generalize the enum idea so that this switch is generated automatically; if you find yourself with handfuls of variations, this might be good to learn.)

And of course you still can #define a specific algorithm as a default:

#define FOO_ALGORITHM algorithm_type::type_a

void foo_with_define(int usual, double args)
{
    return foo<FOO_ALGORITHM>(usual, args);
}

foo_with_define(11, 0.1605);

All these together give you the advantages of all three, with no repetition.

In practice, you can have all three as overloads: one for users who know which algorithm to use at compile-time, those who need to select it at runtime, and those who just want a default (which you can override via a project-wide #define):

// foo.hpp

enum class algorithm_type
{
    type_a,
    type_b,
    type_c
};

// for those who know which algorithm to use
template <algorithm_type AlgorithmType>
void foo(int usual, double args)
{
    std::cout << "common code" << std::endl;

    if (AlgorithmType == algorithm_type::type_a)
    {
        std::cout << "doing type a..." << usual << ", " << args << std::endl;
    }
    else if (AlgorithmType == algorithm_type::type_b)
    {
        std::cout << "doing type b..." << usual << ", " << args << std::endl;
    }
    else if (AlgorithmType == algorithm_type::type_c)
    {
        std::cout << "doing type c..." << usual << ", " << args << std::endl;
    }

    std::cout << "more common code" << std::endl;
}

// for those who will know at runtime
void foo(algorithm_type algorithmType, int usual, double args)
{
    switch (algorithmType)
    {
    case algorithm_type::type_a:
        return foo<algorithm_type::type_a>(usual, args);
    case algorithm_type::type_b:
        return foo<algorithm_type::type_b>(usual, args);
    case algorithm_type::type_c:
        return foo<algorithm_type::type_c>(usual, args);
    default:
        throw std::runtime_error("wat");
    }
}

#ifndef FOO_ALGORITHM
    // chosen to be the best default by profiling
    #define FOO_ALGORITHM algorithm_type::type_b
#endif

// for those who just want a good default
void foo(int usual, double args)
{
    return foo<FOO_ALGORITHM>(usual, args);
}

Of course, if some implementation types are always worse than some other, get rid of it. But if you find there are two useful implementations, there's no harm in keeping both around this way.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 from me, this is a nice solution. – Moo-Juice Mar 26 '13 at 18:50
    
This is not really applicable to my case. Ideally, I would like to compile once and get all versions of the algorithm that were given by ifdefs, then select the alg version at runtime based on a config file. – user1149913 Mar 26 '13 at 18:57
    
@user1149913: Expand your question, I didn't pick that out of it. You're defining more than one via ifdef? How does that work? – GManNickG Mar 26 '13 at 19:03
    
I made some edit's - hopefully, my problem is a little clearer. – user1149913 Mar 26 '13 at 19:14
    
@user1149913: Just sounds to me like you need to change your approach, not continue down that path. Why the mix of all those methods? – GManNickG Mar 26 '13 at 19:22

If you have multiple versions with #ifdefs, its usually best to build multiple executables and have your configuration script decide which executable(s) to run when benchmarking. You then have rules in your Makefile to build the various configurations:

%-FOO.o: %.cc
        $(CXX) -c $(CFLAGS) -DFOO -o $@ $<

%-BAR.o: %.cc
        $(CXX) -c $(CFLAGS) -DBAR -o $@ $<

test-FOO: $(SRCS:%.cc=%-FOO.o)
        $(CXX) $(LDFLAGS) -DFOO -o $@ $^ $(LDLIBS)
share|improve this answer
    
I have been thinking about doing this, but it would add an additional layer of complexity to my experiment scripts. (I am running these on a cluster.) – user1149913 Mar 26 '13 at 19:28
    
Unlike the other solutions, this also has the advantage of easily allowing testing of different compiler directives, eg openmp pragmas, and permutations of multiple choices of code and preprocessor choices. – Jack Wasey Oct 15 '15 at 23:16

You haven't mentioned what compiler you're using, but you can set #defines on the command line for any of them. In gcc, all you would need is to add -D MYTESTFOO to define MYTESTFOO. That would make #defines the way to go - no code changes to propagate, and sure, you'll have different compiled code for each test, but it should be easy to automate.

share|improve this answer

If you place the algorithms themselves inside classes with the same interface, you can pass them as template parameters to the place using the algorithm.

class foo {
public:
  void do_something() {
    std::cout << "foo!" << std::endl;
  }
}

class bar {
public:
  void do_something() {
    std::cout << "bar!" << std::endl;
}

template <class meh>
void something() {
  meh algorithm;
  meh.do_something();
}

int main() {
  std::vector<std::string> config_values = get_config_values_from_somewhere();
  for (const austo& config : config_values) { // c++11 for short notation
    switch (config) {
      case "foo":
        something<foo>();
        break;
      case "bar":
        something<bar>();
        break;
      default:
        std::cout << "undefined behaviour" << std::endl;
    }
  }
}

This way you can use the different behaviours at the same time and distinguish between them by their names. Also if you do not use one of them it will be removed by the optimizer at compile time (not in your problem though).

When reading the configuration file, you just need a factory (or similar) to create the correct instance of the object / function that should use the algorithm before using the algorithm.

Edit: added basic switch.

share|improve this answer
    
My problem is really about not having to create a large number of nearly identical do_something functions, rather than how to select among these functions. – user1149913 Mar 26 '13 at 18:59
    
@user1149913 added a switch to make my point more clearly.. – scones Mar 26 '13 at 19:07

One way would NOT to include the preprocessor directives in the executable, and do it thusly:

#define METHOD METHOD1
int Method1() { return whatever(); };
#undef METHOD

#define METHOD METHOD2
int Method2() { return whatever(); };
#undef METHOD

Assuming whatever is reliant on METHOD then these would give different results.

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